Posts tagged “landscape

A line in the sky

These clouds hung in the sky so they created a soft line blocking some of the rays from the rising sun.  That made for an interesting image with the tall prairie grass and weathered fence line to balance.


Night into day at the Peace Bridge

Calgary’s Peace Bridge has become one of the city’s landmarks and is an important pedestrian connector into the downtown core.  Last weekend I went to Eau Claire a couple of hours before sunrise, walked over to the bridge and then photographed from dark night to bright morning.  The lines of the structure are beautiful and I really enjoyed working with them, as well as the color and lighting, while I was photographing.

The construction crane south of the bridge was working and it played a nice supporting role as an interesting element in a couple of the images as well.


Sunset over Springbank fields

Sunset over a field in Springbank west of Calgary.


A soft sunrise over the Vermilion Lakes

Dawn reached across the Fairholme Range and brushed the sky through to Mount Rundle. An eight second exposure traced the motion in the scene, blurring the water into soft streaks and stretching out the clouds above. Photographed on June 4, 2017 on the Vermilion Lakes in Banff National Park’s Bow Valley.


The May 21st Minnewanka Aurora – into the early morning

Following on from my last post on this geomagnetic storm, here are a few of the images from later in the night.  As the early hours of May 21st dripped past, the sprites in the Northern Lights appeared and then alternated with beautiful glowing arches.  These continued painting across the sky well past the earliest sign of dawn.

The rise of the crescent moon came just after 4 am as the aurora’s glow started to fade and night handed the sky over to day.  Within an hour the sunlight brushed its own colors across the canvas now shared with clouds instead of stars.


Lake Minnewanka’s Northern Lights

There have been strong Aurora Borealis events over the past couple of weeks.  These have extended far enough south that those of us in southern Alberta have been able to enjoy great displays in the night sky.  Throughout the earliest hours of May 20th the Northern Lights flashed, rippled and glowed over Lake Minnewanka in Banff National Park.  It was a beautiful night with few clouds and a sky that looked like someone had spread out all the diamonds across a dark blanket.

Along the lake’s western shore, many people had come out to see the auroras.  When I passed the marina, the storm was in a lull but the green glow drew a sharp line on the Palliser Range’s silhouette.  I’m usually alone when I’m photographing at night so it was neat to be part of a loose community all there to enjoy this natural event.

Most people were lined up along the dam.  I hiked down a trail a bit further south and found a stretch of rock along the water’s edge that looked good to me.  I spent the next four hours watching the sky, scrambling around the rocks and photographing the aurora.  The photographs here are from the first hour during an active period following the lull.  I will share a few more from later in night in another post soon.

 


Day into night at the Palouse Falls

Before visiting the Palouse for the first time this Easter, I was excited to see and photograph the rolling fields with their colours and patterns.  While researching the location and mapping out places I wanted to visit, my friend Jack told me about the Palouse Falls and that became one of those spots.  Jack and I traveled down to Washington and we both found it to be even better than imagined.

So much so that we went there twice during the four days we were away.  Spending a few hours on separate afternoons there each time.  It is a beautiful place to watch the day slowly go into night.


Palouse – through the day


I really enjoyed photographing from sun up until deep into the night when I visited the Palouse in April.  The patterns in the fields, character in the sky and range of colors in both can blend wonderfully at anytime of the day.  These are a few of the ones that stood out from a couple of days on the backroads.


Shadows and light dancing in the Palouse

When I planned my Easter trip to the Palouse, I knew that I would make a couple of visits to Steptoe Butte.  It rises roughly 300 meters above the countryside allowing for an unobstructed view of the entire area.  That elevation gain provides a great perspective on the waves of farmland below.

The first morning that I drove up, when the butte came in sight I found it capped by a loose shroud of cloud.  After stopping to photograph that I headed up and was soon inside the cloud looking out at the sun rising over the clouds that had stacked up low along the horizon.

When the sunlight gently skipped across the rolling hillsides you could almost watch the color warm.  I enjoyed almost an hour of truly amazing light dancing with the shadows it created over the fields.  Those fields adding significantly to the views owing to their flowing lines, gentle patterns and earthy tones.

It was so beautiful that I had little hesitation choosing to return the next day.  The second visit had a subtly different feel but I enjoyed shooting that morning just as much as the day before.


The Palouse Falls into dusk

(Please click on the image to open a higher resolution version)

This waterfall is a very worthwhile detour from the centre of the rolling fields.  I’ve visited this park twice during my first visit to the Palouse area.  The canyon the water has carved out is beautiful and its sharp edges contrast well with the endless swirl of the foam around the pool below the falls.  A great place to spend a lot of time watching the day go by.


Palouse – first impression

I’m visiting the Palouse for the first time over the weekend.  The spring landscape in the early light this morning presented many of the hues in the Easter color palette.  As for first impressions, this is truly beautiful country and it is a fantastic place to explore.  There is much more to say, but the sun is shining and there are many more Easter eggs to find in these hills.


A frozen dawn in the Bow Valley

Frozen dawn over the Vermilion Lakes © Christopher Martin-1599-3

In late January I spent time on a small pond between two of the Vermillion Lakes watching the day break.  The blues of the early morning held on to the landscape as pastels started to be brushed into the clouds above Mount Rundle.  The silence in this sheltered spot was wonderful and helped me to enjoy a calm, mindful meditation while I watched and photographed.