Posts tagged “evening

Motion along Calgary’s skyline

Coach Hill, a rise in west Calgary, affords a great view of city’s downtown.  I found a place there where vehicles traveling along Sarcee Trail pass in front of the knot of skyscrapers. The play of perspective, especially the relative size of the cars to the buildings, was very interesting to me.


Late afternoon along the Livingstone Range

Late afternoon at the foot of the Livingstone Range - © Christopher Martin-6240

Driving along Highway 22 after a day with the eagles, I was traveling parallel to the Livingstone Range of the Canadian Rockies.  The foothills lead up to it in a couple of rounded hills and then the mountains jut up sharply from there.  It was an impressive scene with the sharp contrast between hills and mountains as well as light and shadow of the late afternoon.


Ganden Sumtseling Monastery at dusk

Ganden Sumtseling Monastery at dusk - © Christopher Martin-6850-3
(please click on the image to open a higher resolution version)

The Ganden Sumtseling Monastery is often referred to as the Little Potala given its resemblance to the Dalai Lama’s original home, the Potala Palace in Lhasa, Tibet.  I have not yet visited there but Sumtseling, in Shangri-La on the western edge of China was a very meaningful place for me.  I spent the morning exploring the complex and listening to the resident monks chanting in one of the great halls housed under the golden roofs.  In the afternoon, I wandered around the lake that sits at the foot of the monastery.  In the image above, I framed Sumtseling against the darkening sky whose clouds were gently catching some of the color ahead of sunset.  The hill in the mid ground, above the light green trees, hides the small village that sits under the monastery and serves to keep the magnificent complex uncluttered from this view.


Last light at La Jolla

La Jolla coastline at sunset - 2013 © Christopher Martin

The colours came in nicely when the sun fell under the clouds before hiding behind the ocean horizon.  The shoreline around La Jolla looked like someone had splashed paint across the wet rocks, swirling water as well as the dark clouds hanging above.  This was a few minutes after the previous image I shared from the same sunset – interesting how the colours changed over that short period of time.


Hunting with a Barn owl at dusk

Scouting over Boundary Bay - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Boundary Bay is lovely throughout the year.  Early spring along the levee that runs parallel to the tidal flats, driftwood piles and grassy fields is not an exception.  When we were there last weekend, the rain rolled in as we were watching Snowy owls scattered across the grassland which did contribute to a beautiful scene a couple of hours later.  At the time, it set the owls in their poses as they hunkered down through the showers.

Snowy owl and the heavy rain - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Jack and I waited for the weather to change so that the owls may take to the air.  Dusk was quickly approaching and we had hopes that these raptors would start hunting.  The rain increased and we walked back along the dyke towards the parking lot a couple of kilometers away.  As the car came into view, the rain lessened and when I was at the trailhead, the sun had even hazarded a couple looks under the clouds.  The evening light was beautiful though very soft as it was filtered by the clouds and water vapour in the sky.  A rainbow over the water drew my attention out over the flats and that’s where I first saw a distant bird flying low over the marshes.

After the rain in Boundary Bay 2013 © Christopher Martin

I followed it through the gloom and as it moved closer and into the sunlight, I was able to identify it as a Barn owl (Tyto alba).  This was my first sight of one of these owls in the wild and I fell in love immediately.

First encounter - 2013 © Christopher Martin

They have a chaotic flight pattern where they swoop along and then dive with great conviction downwards at crazy angles when they find a target.  It crisscrossed a large area for about half an hour and all I could have wished for was a bit more light.

Curious Barn owl on a flyby - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Dusk was well entrenched by this time and I was pushing the camera’s ISO and autofocus hard.  The owl was curious too and swooped by on two separate occasions.  The whole time spent watching this bird was a great experience and I’m looking forward to my next encounter with one of these beautiful owls.

In flight - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Barn owl flight over Boundary Bay - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Night flight - 2013 © Christopher Martin

I could still make out the silhouette as it flew further away but my attention was pulled in a new direction by a Short-eared owl that circled by for a couple of minutes and then a Snowy which, freed from its perch by the calm weather, landed on a pile of waterlogged wood less than a stone’s throw away.  I hope to share some of those photographs soon.

 


Hide and seek with a blue moon

 

(please click on an image to open a higher resolution version)

Last night as the setting sun was painting the broken clouds above Lake Okanagan, the waxing moon was using them to hide as it rose.  The colours in the evening sky were beautiful pastels and the bright lunar surface stood in sharp contrast.

This blue moon will be full on August 31st so these images are of the moon in its gibbous waxing phase.

 

I’ll be watching again tonight to see if our earth’s satellite has any more tricks planned.


Evening in the Foothills

The light this evening was lovely and the lines of the hillsides of the Foothills towards Kananaskis Country looked like a water-colour painting.


Sunset at Cathedral Rock

(please click on any image to open a higher resolution version)

Bobbi and I are in Sedona, Arizona for a few days this week.  We drove into the town yesterday and went exploring down at the Red Rock Crossing for a couple of hours until nightfall.  I haven’t been here before so Bobbi is in the role of guide and I am the happy follower.

We went to this location which is split by Oak Creek.  The cool waters drew a number of small groups and families offering respite from the 42°C (108°F) heat of the day.  We hiked along the riverside trails and photographed reflections in the water, the towering red rocks that backstop the area as well as a couple of lizards.  A beautiful place to escape the heat.

What makes this place a destination for landscape photographers are the views of Cathedral Rock and the opportunity to work with its reflections in the creek.  At sunset the last sunlight of the day makes the rocks glow.  Last night did not disappoint and I had a wonderful time playing with the elements at hand.


Into an eclipse

 

The moon gave it a great try but from our vantage point just west of Calgary, it just missed blocking out the sun this evening.  This was in no way a failure on the moon’s part, just our position in the universe relative to it and the sun.  As it was, the crescent created by the moon swinging in front of the sun was very impressive.

There was haze in the sky which worked well with the dark glass I had piled on to drop the bright sunlight as much as possible.  When a thick cloud pulled above the horizon, I thought it might be too heavy but the colors and textures were amazing.

 

At this point I thought the moon may move into position in the ring of fire.  I hadn’t looked into this solar eclipse much so I did not know if we were in the right location.  It was exciting to watch the sun and moon approach.  When the moon swung away, it was still great to watch.


Prairie Skies – Sunset, Storms and a Lightning Strike

On the drive across the prairies to Medicine Hat last weekend, Bobbi and I drove through an early spring storm near sunset.  The trailing edge of the storm clouds were to the west and the sunlight slipped in along with some amazing color.

To the east, the strongest part of the storm was still releasing wind, rain and a bit of lightning.  With a few 30 second exposures I got lucky and caught this bolt as it shot out of the darkness.


Up into the blue

On Saturday evening, I was combing Bragg Creek’s back roads for a Great Gray Owl I have seen a couple of times lately.  I did not find the owl but enjoyed the scintillating blues in the sky contrasting with the bright white clouds.  I paused my search to watch the sky and see if any of the clouds picked up the sunset colors once the sun dropped.  I was mesmerized by these colors and contrasts and the scene faded to gray and then black in just a few minutes.


Summer Storm Breaking Up

I was in a great location to watch the storm that had rolled in Friday night and dropped many, many buckets of rain through Saturday afternoon start to break up.

The drama in the clouds west of Calgary was beautiful to watch build and fall away for a few minutes.

Certainly a different feel in black and white.  In the version above I wanted to bring the weathered barn to greater prominence.  I ended up shedding the color and adding a little grain to create a more historical, antique feel.


Watery Reflections of South Carolina

Ran across some beautiful, warm evening light when I was in North Myrtle Beach a few days ago.  I was walking on the boardwalk around Prices Swamp Run and the reflections in the rippling water were beautiful.

 


Calgary’s Downtown Core at Sunset

I was out on a windy hill east of Calgary’s downtown core on Monday night photographing the city center at sunset. There were some great clouds that soaked up the light to create some beautiful hues that reflected into the buildings. As the sun fell, stray light would find a clear patch through the clouds and then bounce around the glass on the buildings. A beautiful scene to photograph, here are a few from the evening.

Although it is no longer the tallest building along the skyline, the Calgary Tower is still an icon for the city.  This is a different look at the building as dusk quickly advanced.

A view of the whole downtown as the sunlight waned.


Elbow Falls: stars and starlight

I went up to Elbow Falls to see if the aurora borealis wanted to come out and play.  Recently I have been dreaming of images of the falls with the northern lights reflecting off of the water and casting an unusual glow on the land.  So, I sat on a snow-covered boulder for a couple of hours after sunset waiting.  The ionosphere was quiet while I was there and I didn’t see any trace of the lights (I checked AuroraMax the next day for the night’s activity and things picked up around 11:30, an hour after I left my perch above the river).  However, the sky fading into night was beautiful to watch and when the stars emerged from the thin haze above the valley they were brilliant.  Here, Betelgeuse is the orange star above the three stars that form Orion’s Belt and the large star above the ridge is Canis Major.

With time on my hands waiting, I kept busy photographing the river from a couple of spots and shooting the sky.  Two great subjects to work with.  In the image above, a high ISO and wide aperture setting allowed for a relatively short exposure in the darkness which kept the stars from tracing their march across the sky while allowing the water and clouds to stretch and blur.  The grain in the image doesn’t work for some people but I like it here and I chose to leave most of it in during the processing.

Turning my back to the falls, I was facing east out of the mountains towards Calgary.  The urban glow was faint to the human eye but I tried a long exposure and was struck by the colors and textures captured by the haze and wispy clouds.  I played around with settings trying to get as many of the stars as possible to be visible as they created a great pattern amid the colorful sky. 

So, I’ll be back up at Elbow Falls again to watch for the northern lights soon.  The peak of the sun’s current active phase if forecasted to be in 2013 so there should be great opportunities to realize at least a few of the visuals rolling around in my head.


2010 – My favourite photograph from last year

This is my favourite image that I made last year.  Simple composition, interesting patterns, good colour and a great memory behind it.

These monks worked with our small group on and around the U Bein Bridge in Amarapura in Myanmar.  We had gone to their monastery and spoke with the Abbott and then with these monks about the photographs that we wanted to make that afternoon.   They were interested to see the end result and really cooperative through the whole time.

The footbridge runs 3/4 of a mile long and is made of teak columns salvaged in 1849 under the direction of the mayor at the time, U Bein.  He got a bridge named after him and the people got a way to cross Lake Taungthaman from Amarapura to an island in the middle.  The traffic is steady in both directions in the afternoon and into the evening with school children, workers, families and monks crossing on foot and bicycle.

Our guide, Win, used one of the boats that take tourists for a float along the bridge to ferry the monks to a small spit of land about halfway between either end of the bridge.  At this time of the year, in February, the water is low enough that there are a couple of places that stay above the waterline around the bridge.  In the dry season, I was told the lake can be almost empty.  In the wet season, the water has been higher than the walkway!  I hope to get back to see either of these extremes.  From the little island there is a set of stairs that lead up to the bridge deck.  The monks and our guide went up and our group of four photographers headed away from the bridge to frame the scene the way each of us were imagining.   The sun was dropping slowly at that point and I was starting to get excited because the light was warming up and I was hopeful that we were heading towards something special.

Children paddling towards U Bein in golden evening light.  Settings 1/160 seconds at f/11,  ISO 100 at 280mm (70-200 + 1.4X extender)

The scene on the bridge was chaotic and our guide was busy explaining to the people lingering around what we were up to, why the monks were standing between the pylons and when we were hoping to get a break in the traffic.  The crowd built up slowly but everyone was patient and seemed to enjoy watching us waving and shouting back and forth to get the men on the bridge in place.

The evening scene on the bridge. Notice the blue tones in the sky below the sun. Settings 1/200 seconds at f/11, ISO 200 at 98mm (70-200 lens + 1.4X extender).

Win was fantastic sharing what we were doing with the people as they waited, and they in turn were great, waiting for about 10 minutes on both sides while the sun fell in line with the monks and the bridge.  It moved very quickly and as it did the gold colour in the sky gave way to blue and purple tones as the sunlight had to push through more atmosphere as well as the haze rising up from the water and the forest.

The photograph immediately before my favourite was fun because I had just changed lenses to a 300mm with a 1.4x extender to get as much reach as I could.  This was the first image where I was able to isolate the blue and purple section of the sky away from the golds and oranges.  That allowed these darker colours to really saturate.  That’s when I knew I had the background that I had imagined to frame the monks against.

1/250 seconds at f/11, ISO 200 at 420mm (300mm + 1.4x extender)

The last shots of this scene caught the sun as it went under the bridge and then disappeared into the hillside across the plain.  From the moment where the sun was just above the umbrellas to where it is peeking under the bridge took just over three minutes.  It seemed much less as I was photographing the scene – a flurry of shooting, checking histograms and adjusting settings and compositions.  It was a very special opportunity so I was doing everything to make sure that I was getting the best that I could out of the moment.  A great memory of a wonderful place.

 

1/80 seconds at f/10, ISO 200 at 420mm (300mm + 1.4X extender)

 

 



The C Train in Motion

Here, I panned with the one of Calgary’s C Train cars as it moved out of downtown towards the southern reaches of the line.  I used a longer exposure, 1/4 of a second, to really stretch the lines of light and dark in background.  Usually I pan the trains at between 1/10 and 1/20 of a second as that allows for decent blur streaks in the background and achieving a sharp subject (the train or sometimes its occupants).  Longer exposures can end up a blurry mess quite easily.  In this image, my panning matched the train’s movement pretty well so outline at the front of the vehicle is clearly that of a train.  Not sharp but I think there is a good balance between the background blur and the lines and edges of the train.  I think there is a lot of movement in this photo which was my intent.


A Winter Scene – Sunset on the Elbow River

On Boxing day the afternoon gave way to evening in a rush of color that pulled me outside, running down the path to the river.  I had enough time to get the tripod set up and make a few photographs before the pastel hues evaporated, leaving the dark shades of blue to fight briefly against the night.

This river is the Elbow and it runs down from the Canadian Rocky Mountains, east through forests in Kananaskis and out onto the Albertan Prairie through Springbank.  The Elbow River’s source is Elbow Lake, from there it runs through a large section of Kananaskis, past Bragg Creek and enters Calgary at Weaselhead Flats.  West of the Calgary Zoo, the Elbow joins the Bow River and they continue eastward joining the South Saskatchewan River and finally entering Hudson Bay.  It does not draw as much attention as the Bow River which runs through Banff, Canmore and Cochrane before reaching Calgary.  However it hosts many beautiful locations and is where I spend much of my time photographing when I’m outdoors throughout the year.


Sunsets on the Rockies

The low trajectory of the winter sun here in Alberta results in a short day with sunrise currently at 8:35 am and sunset at 4:30 pm.  The angle makes for really good light through much of the day which compensates for the reduced daylight.  The drives home have allowed me to enjoy some really nice sunsets.  Here are a few that I was able to stop and watch for a few minutes.

This last one I wanted to get a soft feel to the scene but I may have gotten a bit carried away resulting in too much blur in the mountains.  The fickle beauty of experimentation – sometimes it works and other times it seems to take time off.