Posts tagged “animals

Early rutting in the mist

Stags in the Bragg Creek mist - © Christopher Martin-4016

I found this pair of White-tailed deer on a misty morning a couple of weeks ago. The stag on the right jabbed the other a couple of times.  It took a bit of prodding, but they eventually jousted for a few short skirmishes before going back to grazing in the dew-soaked field.  The rut will come in a few weeks, it seemed these two were getting in a little practice.

Stags in the Bragg Creek mist - © Christopher Martin-4011

Stags in the Bragg Creek mist - © Christopher Martin-4007

Stags in the Bragg Creek mist - © Christopher Martin-4002

Stags in the Bragg Creek mist - © Christopher Martin-4001


A bear and her berries

Kananaskis Grizzly 152 in the rain - © Christopher Martin-2177

For the second week in a row, I caught up Grizzly bear #152, and her smile, in Kananaskis’s Spray Valley Provincial Park.  Once more she was feasting on Buffalo berries.  Unlike the sunny encounter last week, the rain was falling steadily providing a sheen to the leaves, the bear’s coat and the tall grass.

Kananaskis Grizzly 152 in the rain - © Christopher Martin-2075

Kananaskis Grizzly 152 in the rain - © Christopher Martin-2055

The bear went in and out of the bushes, eating steadily along the way.  Again I was reminded how easily they can disappear within the vegetation – they are a part of the land and seem to join it and separate at will.

Kananaskis Grizzly 152 in the rain - © Christopher Martin-2343

Kananaskis Grizzly 152 in the rain - © Christopher Martin-2505

Kananaskis Grizzly 152 in the rain - © Christopher Martin-2028

 


A smiling Grizzly in Kananaskis

Kananaskis Grizzly 152 - © Christopher Martin-1046

A couple of hours after watching a Black bear in a patch of Buffalo berries, I found this Grizzly in another one a few kilometres away.  She appeared to be a very happy bear, taking some anthropomorphic liberties, I even thought she smiled a few times as in the photo above!

Kananaskis Grizzly 152 - © Christopher Martin-1335

This female’s tag has the number 152 and she has spent her life in Kananaskis Country according to what I could find online.  With the poor berry crops of the previous two years, it is not surprising she is without cubs this year.  I hope that the much better fortune this year will lead to her and the other females in the central Rockies bringing many cubs out of their winter caves next spring.

Kananaskis Grizzly 152 - © Christopher Martin-1000

At one point, the Conservation officer attending blew the fog horn which startled the bear into a short run. One that ended at the next berry patch.

Kananaskis Grizzly 152 - © Christopher Martin-1277

She dug up the ground near the second patch a little bit too.  I expected her to be solely focused on the berries but maybe a few roots made for a better, and more complete, lunch.

Kananaskis Grizzly 152 - © Christopher Martin-1176

When she turned around to dig in another spot, it was impossible to not stare at those incredible claws!

Kananaskis Grizzly 152 - © Christopher Martin-1162


Fine dining in the woods

Kananaskis Black bear in Buffalo berries - © Christopher Martin-0907-3

This summer’s weather – rain and sunshine in a daily tug-of-war – has been a perfect gardener for the wild Buffalo berries.  These have ripened over the past week or two and are drawing in the bears throughout Kananaskis.  This Black bear made it easy for me to find him when he sauntered across the road a couple of hundred metres in front of me.  I pulled up to find him standing up in the middle of a patch feasting on the berries.

Kananaskis Black bear in Buffalo berries - © Christopher Martin-0908

They are a great source of calories for the bears so it is wonderful to see so much fruit this year.  Some years are not nearly as abundant and it seemed like that was not lost on this beautiful bear.  He appeared to be relishing almost every bite.  The berries stretched back into the forest and he slowly made his way further back as he ate.  I lost sight of him shortly after these pictures but could see branches bend and hear the odd one crack for several more minutes before he vanished back into the wilderness as they often do.

Kananaskis Black bear in Buffalo berries - © Christopher Martin-0915


Eagle fishing in the Banff National Park

Eagle fishing in Banff - © Christopher Martin-5085

I watched this eagle glide across the Vermilion Lake from its nest on the far side.  Ahead of his arrival on the shore in front of me, waterfowl and a couple of Great blue heron scattered in all directions.  The eagle flew higher and circled a couple of times, staring into the water.  He dove, his claws slicing the water, but finding no joy.  The raptor pulled up into a branch of a dead tree to reconsider its approach.

Eagle fishing in Banff - © Christopher Martin-5077

Eagle fishing in Banff - © Christopher Martin-5078

Twenty minutes passed before his second flight.  He flew in a wide arc, gaining a little more altitude.  The birds that had been on the water, had not returned so the eagle had a clean line this time.

Eagle fishing in Banff - © Christopher Martin-5086

He dove, again, and this time his talons came off the surface with a fish in their grasp.

Eagle fishing in Banff - © Christopher Martin-5089

The fish was quickly moved from talons to beak and then swallowed mid-flight.

Eagle fishing in Banff - © Christopher Martin-5093

The eagle flew back up to the same tree and settled on a branch near where it had been pestered by the blackbird earlier.  From there, I hoped he would fish again and I waited for more than an hour.  Along the way, he called out a few times which gave some interesting head and beak positions to photograph.

Eagle fishing in Banff - © Christopher Martin-5253

Eagle fishing in Banff - © Christopher Martin-5420


A Great gray owl in Redwood Meadows

Great gray owl in Redwood Meadows - © Christopher Martin-3782-3

I’ve lived in Redwood Meadows for over 9 years and have never photographed a Great gray owl in the daylight here.  A little while ago, I was driving back from Bragg Creek and spotted this owl perched on a fence post.  I watched him in the sun for a little while before he flew.  Then he quickly moved from post to post for a couple of minutes, with short breaks between flights.

Great gray owl in Redwood Meadows - © Christopher Martin-3714

Great gray owl in Redwood Meadows - © Christopher Martin-3730

Great gray owl in Redwood Meadows - © Christopher Martin-3735

Great gray owl in Redwood Meadows - © Christopher Martin-3736

Great gray owl in Redwood Meadows - © Christopher Martin-3737-2

Great gray owl in Redwood Meadows - © Christopher Martin-3738

Great gray owl in Redwood Meadows - © Christopher Martin-3748

Great gray owl in Redwood Meadows - © Christopher Martin-3749

Eventually he flew to the top of a nearby tree for a better view.  That did not last long and he flew directly in front of me as he crossed the road (the first photo int his story) and flew into the heavier forest on the edge of the Tsuu T’ina Rodeo and Pow Wow grounds.

Great gray owl in Redwood Meadows - © Christopher Martin-3780

 


An evening with Grizzly bears in Yellowstone

Yellowstone Grizzly bear mom and cubs at dusk - © Christopher Martin-9331

The second time I crossed paths with this family of Grizzly bears it was deep into dusk.  I spotted the mother in the hill above the Swan Lake Flat about an hour earlier but quickly lost her and the cubs in the rolling slopes as they made their way down.

Yellowstone Grizzly bear mom and cubs at dusk - © Christopher Martin-9292

When they did appear it surprised me how close they got before I saw them.  Knowing the size of an adult Grizzly, it showed me how high those hills are.  The trio walked and grazed, with he twins play fighting along the way, towards the Grand Loop Road eventually settling about 150 metres away.

Yellowstone Grizzly bear mom and cubs at dusk - © Christopher Martin-9348-3

The failing light made photographing the bears a fun challenge.  The golden halos created by the glow from the western horizon being caught by the hair in their coats was amazing.  That alone was more than worth the wait.

Yellowstone Grizzly bear mom and cubs at dusk - © Christopher Martin-9360

Yellowstone Grizzly bear mom and cubs at dusk - © Christopher Martin-9395

Yellowstone Grizzly bear mom and cubs at dusk - © Christopher Martin-9352

Yellowstone Grizzly bear mom and cubs at dusk - © Christopher Martin-9423

They moved parallel to the road for about 20 minutes before heading back into the hills.

Yellowstone Grizzly bear mom and cubs at dusk - © Christopher Martin-9481


A Heron in Banff

Banff Great blue heron - © Christopher Martin-1754

I was in Banff for an early morning sunrise shoot a couple of weeks ago.  Following that, I spent the morning hiking and driving around looking for wildlife.  The first animal I found was this Great blue heron fishing on the first Vermilion Lake.

Banff Great blue heron - © Christopher Martin-1747

Banff Great blue heron - © Christopher Martin-1744

Following this short story of the heron in Yellowstone National Park, I thought it would be good to post another with its Canadian cousin.  I watched the heron work in the long grass on the lake edge for several minutes before it turned away from the sun and flew eastward and beyond my sight.

Banff Great blue heron - © Christopher Martin-1759

Banff Great blue heron - © Christopher Martin-1767

 


A forest hunter

Great gray owl's forest hunt - © Christopher Martin-2969-4

On a warm summer evening, down a country road leading nowhere, I found a pair of Great gray owls.  One was hunting actively near where I set up while the other was perched deeper in the forest.

Great gray owl's forest hunt - © Christopher Martin-2966

The shadows lengthened and I hoped for a special moment before the sun slipped below the ridge to the west.  She flew over me and I thought that would be the end of the encounter as she flew into the trees.  Instead, she alighted on this small branch and stared intently at a couple of spots in the grass.  Shortly after she dove headlong into one of those spots and disappeared.  

Great gray owl's forest hunt - © Christopher Martin-2970

Several seconds ticked by and then she leaped into the air – with a field mouse secured in her beak.  It was my good fortune that she flew directly towards me as she gained altitude before banking to her left and heading further uphill towards her nest.  The first image and the ones directly below are the series as she flew through the trees towards me.
Great gray owl's forest hunt - © Christopher Martin-2971
Great gray owl's forest hunt - © Christopher Martin-2972
Great gray owl's forest hunt - © Christopher Martin-2973
Great gray owl's forest hunt - © Christopher Martin-2974
Great gray owl's forest hunt - © Christopher Martin-2975

 These were a series of moments well beyond what I was even hoping for.


The Pronghorn shake

Yellowstone Pronghorn Shake - © Christopher Martin-8435-2

Pronghorns are scattered across Yellowstone.  They range from the lower grasslands through to high valley meadows.  It was a cold morning so I was not surprised this fellow wanted to shake off the cold.  When the droplets flew from his position a little higher than me, the effect looked more like there had been an explosion.  I thought it was a good start to our respective days.

Yellowstone Pronghorn Shake - © Christopher Martin-8421

I watched him approach from Soda Butte Creek at the northeast end of the Lamar Valley.  He looked like he had just crossed it but maybe that was just from the rain at daybreak.  Shortly after spinning off the water, the sun came out, apparently to help dry his coat.  The wet sagebrush began to steam as soon as the sunlight hit it, creating a haze around the Pronghorn.

Yellowstone Pronghorn Shake - © Christopher Martin-8457

He passed within 30 yards of me and then crossed the road on his way up the base of Druid Peak’s southern flank.

Yellowstone Pronghorn Shake - © Christopher Martin-8466

Yellowstone Pronghorn Shake - © Christopher Martin-8492


I love owls but…

Great gray owl's meadow flight - © Christopher Martin-7050
The Great gray owls are a favourite animal of mine.  No surprise there for anyone who visits my site.  This time of the year is great for photographing them near where I live so I often don’t travel too far afield – content to spend my time watching this beautiful birds.  This weekend, I’m breaking with habit and heading to Yellowstone National Park.  For all kinds of reasons I have not yet been there so I’m really excited.  The wildlife and the landscapes there have filled my dreams for years so I can’t wait to get going later this afternoon.  Wish me luck – I will share what I am fortunate enough to see when I return.

Great gray owl's meadow flight - © Christopher Martin-7049

And, they have Great grays down there so maybe I’ll get to see some of the Yellowstone family too!


Great gray owl on frost and in gold

Great Gray Owl in the frosty meadow - © Christopher Martin-6695-2

Last week’s dropping mercury and precipitation allowed the fields around Bragg Creek to be encased in frost on the weekend.  I spent the morning watching birds of all sizes waking up – with most waiting for the sun to warm things up a bit.  This Great gray owl was more interested in breakfast and I watched him hunt for a couple of hours taking his catches back to the nest hidden somewhere in the forest nearby.  These images of the owl just lifting off the grass with a field mouse in its beak really captured the tone of the morning – frosted grass, shafts of golden light, a spectacular bird in flight.  It was another wonderful morning spent in awe of the natural world.

 

Great Gray Owl in the frosty meadow - © Christopher Martin-6646

Great Gray Owl in the frosty meadow - © Christopher Martin-6692

Great Gray Owl in the frosty meadow - © Christopher Martin-6647


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