Posts tagged “Canada

Autumn abstract

On the first day of October, I was in Banff National Park and found great fall colors across the Bow Valley.  I returned to Hillsdale Meadow along the Bow Valley Parkway where I expected the larch would be showing their best golds and yellows. I wasn’t disappointed!  For this image, I used a slow shutter to abstract the landscape similar to how I had done with the same stand of trees in July.  I moved the camera downwards during the 1/40th of a second exposure to exaggerate the vertical lines present in the golden trees and echoed in the evergreens in the mountainside behind.


A family of moose in Kananaskis Country

This was easily one of the sweetest moments I’ve seen when this bull moose nuzzled with his calf.

The bull is likely mating with the cow again this year which brings him into the same area as the calf. I didn’t expect them to have a bond but when this tender moment happened on the weekend, I was obviously wrong.

 

This calf was born in 2016 and still stays close to his mother. The three moose have been hanging around each other again during this year’s rut. I don’t know how long they will stay together as a little family before the bull returns to the solitary life.

When I started watching them, the calf was laying down while the parents grazed separately nearby.  Over the next hour they all moved slowly around the small meadow and the edge of the forest.  It was a relaxed atmosphere which I think is reflected in the photographs.

Eventually the big fellow laid down and was soon napping.  The cow and calf continued grazing.  And I headed home.


A few vignettes of autumn

Fall has rushed in quickly this year and I wanted to share a few photographs from this season before it has moved on. Above, I was photographing the Northern Lights along the Elbow River and used a flashlight to illuminate one tree’s fall colors.

The golden leaves can blow away at any point so I stopped as often as I could when I found a scene that captured a little of the season’s soul.

The forest, recovering from the controlled burn at Sawback Ridge in Banff National Park, exploded into a riot of fall color in September.  An abandoned farm building in Springbank was similarly surrounded.

The fields in the foothills were ready for the final harvests by the end of September.  The view across the fields and on to the eastern flanks of the Rocky Mountains is beautiful.

The snow is falling again this morning so who knows how long autumn will linger.  It’s all good, I enjoy each season as they come and go.


Upper Kananaskis Lake image featured on National Geographic’s Daily Dozen Website

This image of a summer sunrise at Upper Kananaskis Lake in the Peter Lougheed Provincial Park has been selected as one of National Geographic’s Daily Dozen for October 5th.

The yellow border is a siren call for many photographers – and certainly is for me.  I have had several images published on National Geographic’s websites but the novelty never wears off so it’s a great start to the day!

There is voting on each day’s twelve images that are selected by one of the National Geographic editors.  The image which receives the highest number of votes has the potential to be published in the National Geographic magazine.  If you do check out the today’s Daily Dozen, have a look at the images and vote for the one that you like best.  I really love Nguyen Tat Thang’s photograph of mist and fog over the city of Dalat in Vietnam.


Flashback Friday – baby bear bites

Forgive the double alliterations in the title!  I recently came across one of these pictures in my image library.  That recalled the encounter with this grizzly bear and her three cubs in 2012.  It was wet morning in June and my friend Jeff and I were out photographing near the Vermilion Lakes.  We found the bears under the trees.  While mom was sleeping, these two year olds were rough housing with abandon.

Though the bared teeth look fierce no true biting happened.  Even the play lost their interest before long and they alternated sprawling across mom and nursing.  We left then and it seemed they were close to a nap themselves – although they may have powered up again instead.

When they separated, I was able to grab a couple of individual shots.  Truly beautiful animals.  Five years on, I wonder how they have made out.  Their mother, 64, was well known in the Banff area but disappeared at the age of 25 and was assumed to have died in late 2013.  I believe one of these cubs was 148 who was relocated out of Banff earlier this year.  That move was due to her increasing encounters with humans but, tragically, she was shot and killed last Sunday in British Columbia.  A death, legal though it was, which I am having great difficulty accepting.  Particularly when that province will outlaw trophy hunting of grizzly bears starting on November 30th.    I’m a bit teary now so I’ll finish here.

Here is one of the last photographs I took of 64.


A grand morning at the Vermilion Lakes

Time spent at the Vermilion Lakes in Banff National Park is always worthwhile.  It had been a while since I had watched day break there so on the weekend I drove up to do that.  I went very early so I was able to make some long exposures at the second lake before the morning arrived.

With sunrise threatening, other people wanting to enjoy the quiet spectacle came down the road to find their spot.  I didn’t mind adding a light streak into the scene!

When the clouds above the Fairholme Range to the east began to glow the day soon rushed in behind.  The lake dazzled again, as usual, reflecting Mount Rundle and framing the energetic sky above as it ran through dawn’s color palette.

A small group of photographers assembled along the shoreline nearby as the sky’s performance heightened.  The tone of the hushed murmurs suggested they were enjoying the moment.  I certainly was.


Upper Kananaskis Lake – summer mornings

This summer I feel like I have rediscovered the Kananaskis Lakes located in the Peter Lougheed Provincial Park.  In particular, I have spent a lot of time at the upper lake.  The peaks that ring the lake have appealed to me recently in a new way and I have been drawn to visit at different times of the day to photograph them.

The jagged profiles, mirrored reflections and rocky shoreline are all elements I love to work with and the Upper Kananaskis Lake knits these together in a beautiful way.  These are a few of the photographs I like from these visits.

And here are some evening shots from an earlier post this summer as well.  It’s a beautiful place to spend time.

 


A dance with Sandhill cranes

Sandhill crane couples dance with each other.  I found this pair in a field west of Bragg Creek and was lucky to be able to watch them.

A few Canada geese watched the dance as well.  They seemed to watch with little interest.  Far less than me.

Sandhill crane dancing - © Christopher Martin-2992


#139 in the berries

I found grizzly bear #139 between the Upper and Lower Kananaskis Lakes last weekend.  He has a history of being in the news over the past couple of year (not a problem bear just one that people find with relative frequency so there are a fair number of images and articles on him).  This time, he was strolling between the forest and the Kananaskis Lake road, grazing on the buffalo berries that are ripe and delicious (for the bears at least – they are too tart for my taste when they first ripen).

 

I left the bear after alerting one of the rangers to his presence as he was moving closer to a campground.  I went for a walk along the shoreline a few kilometres away and returned past the spot an hour later.  The bear had crossed the road by then and was grazing on the high side of the hill.

He has been referred to as scrawny in the past so it was good to see him looking healthy and devouring berries.  He’s a beautiful bear – especially when he flashes that wonderful smile (please allow for a bit of anthropomorphization.  I truly believe animals have personalities and emotions).  I hope to cross paths with him again for years to come.


Wedge Pond – mist, reflection and alpenglow

Wedge Pond is a favourite location of mine in Kananaskis Country.  She sits below the massive chunk of rock that is Mount Kidd and in calm moments mirrors the entire mountain on her surface.  Several more peaks along the Kananaskis River Valley are prominent from the shoreline as well.  Collectively they provide a lot of visually appealing elements to work with when photographing around this little lake.  I usually head there in late September when the aspen trees around the pond turn a brilliant yellow (previous posts with those images).  A couple of weeks ago I was contacted by a friendly Australian photographer who will be coming this way next month and was looking for some local information about Kananaskis and Wedge Pond in particular.  That got me thinking about Wedge a little earlier than usual and I headed up in the wee hours on August 11th..

The mist was swirling early.  Cold, humid air and a gentle breeze combined to push the mist across the water.  On this day, the sky was clear and the alpenglow was visible above the mountains early and then slid down the surrounding peaks.  The morning exceeded all expectations I may have had and I was blessed with an amazing start to the day.  The red that first painted the peaks was soon washed over with golden sunlight and I headed up for a hike at Chester Lake.


A smoked sunrise

The smoke from the wildfires in British Columbia and Alberta continues to come and go west of the Rockies in southwestern Alberta depending on severity of the fires, the weather and the wind.  One morning last week it was particularly thick and made the rising sun a circle of deep red, orange and yellow.  At one point wispy clouds layered above the sun that was truly beautiful to me.


Stags in the hazy morning sunshine

There were two mule deer bucks nibbling on roadside grass that I came across last weekend.  They were between the two Kananaskis Lakes and they ran up the hillside to the forest edge when another car passed by.  This brought them into the morning sunshine which illuminated them wonderfully.

One of the stags paused at the top of the hill before disappearing behind the trees.  The other walked along the ridge above the road for a few minutes.

He was enjoying the buffalo berries which are ripe throughout the valleys in Kananaskis now.  I always think of these berries as being food for the bears but this fellow reminded me that they are a delicious snack for many of the animals in the Rockies.

The smoke from the wildfires in British Columbia and Alberta continues to roll across the west.  That morning the resulting haze was quite heavy which warmed and softened the sunlight.  Beautiful light to work with – a very small and personal silver lining to a massive issue impacting millions of people.  This photo of peaks in the Kananaskis valley gives some indication of the atmosphere on that morning.

The stag kept an eye on me but with little traffic and me staying in my car had little provocation to join his partner in the woods.  I left him still grazing and continued my travels around K-Country.