Posts tagged “Canada

Flashback Friday – a circle of light at the Vermilion Lakes

In August I photographed through the night along the Vermilion Lakes.  The air was heavy with smoke from nearby wildfires.  This long exposure caught the glow from the town of Banff as it pushed through thick haze and got caught in clouds hanging low in the Bow Valley.  A timer and a flashlight allowed me to run out onto this dock on the third Vermilion Lake and trace out the circle in this image.


A line in the sky

These clouds hung in the sky so they created a soft line blocking some of the rays from the rising sun.  That made for an interesting image with the tall prairie grass and weathered fence line to balance.


Night into day at the Peace Bridge

Calgary’s Peace Bridge has become one of the city’s landmarks and is an important pedestrian connector into the downtown core.  Last weekend I went to Eau Claire a couple of hours before sunrise, walked over to the bridge and then photographed from dark night to bright morning.  The lines of the structure are beautiful and I really enjoyed working with them, as well as the color and lighting, while I was photographing.

The construction crane south of the bridge was working and it played a nice supporting role as an interesting element in a couple of the images as well.


Tobogganing in Kananaskis Country

 

My children, one of their good friends and I went to a hill along Highway 66 west of Bragg Creek in Kananaskis last week.  It was at the front end of the latest warm spell in southern Alberta so it was great to be outside and there was still a lot of snow. In between runs we all made together, the kids made a few runs where I photographed them flying down, catching air and spraying snow with little regard for its well-being.  A fantastic afternoon with my two very favorite people in the world.

Kian went full punk off of one jump.  Later Kezia plowed through it!


Sunrise over prairie farmland east of High River

I enjoyed another sunrise on the prairies east of High River this weekend.  This time around, I used a couple of farms and their buildings to break up the line of the horizon.  The layers of cloud across the sky caught the sunlight presenting a range of pastels as the morning moved through dawn.

I stepped infront of the camera when I had the tripod facing the beautiful display of pink hues in the clouds to the north.  As the sun rose it went behind a thick band of cloud so I looked down a couple of snow-covered range roads towards the Rocky Mountains before the warm light cooled and disappeared.

 


Flashback Friday – owl to perch flight

A couple of years ago I watched this owl hunting in the snow west of Bragg Creek.  It was a relatively warm day for March and this great gray was active for a long while before launching off of a fence post and flying upwards to this skeletal tree.  I liked how the eyes are locked on the landing spot in this image.  The overcast sky and bare branches suited the gray feathers backlit against the clouds.


Nightscapes of downtown Calgary

 

A few photographs of downtown Calgary from the north side of the Centre Street Bridge last week during the latest cold snap.

 

On this last photograph, I entered the frame with the help of a timer in order to provide a contrasting element in the foreground.


Dawn over the prairies

I caught a sunrise on the prairies east of Mossleigh on the weekend.  Fog had rolled over a large swath of southern Alberta so the morning was spent watching skirmishes between the rising sun burning off the clouds and the walls of fog.  Here the early pink light had painted the clouds but not yet reached the fields nor broken through the opaque wall behind this tree.


Flashback Friday – Khutzeymateen Mists

It’s been a couple of years since I last visited the Khutzeymateen Inlet.  A situation I hope to correct in the new year.  I may even lead a tour there next fall.  Thinking about the Khutzeymateen, it’s easy to relive the bear encounters (for me, those can be seen at this link, this one or this one) as they can be intimate in a way that I find unique and mesmerizing.  For whatever reason, I’ve been recalling the mists that rarely disappear in the valley.  It clings to the trees as the wind and sun push wisps, walls and blankets of fog up and down the steep mountainsides.  The continuous motion tears holes in these terrestrial clouds.  The view changes endlessly as they drag across the landscape exposing islands of forest here and a rocky shoreline there.

And, it certainly doesn’t hurt having these elements as the backdrop for bear photographs either!


Continuing through dawn at one of the Vermilion Lakes

When I arrived at the second Vermilion Lake and scrambled down to the shoreline I was alone and in darkness.  Once I turned off my headlamp my eyes adjusted and a thin line brightening to the east.  Mount Rundle stood resolutely across the water and I started to make out clouds as they slid toward the horizon.

 

The image above was a 25 second exposure on f/10 and ISO 800 taken at 7:25 AM.  I used that to get a feel for how the scene looked as it was still too dark to make out much of the details and color in the sky with my eyes alone.

I didn’t mind the grass but I chose to focus on the sky and its reflection so a few steps to the right and setting up closer to the waterline was the next step.  The clouds in the image above made a great frame around Rundle and the pre-sunrise colors intensified considerably by the time that I made this photograph at 7:35 AM.

The pre-dawn light’s color faded out before 8 AM.  The lull before the fire came into the sky did not last long and I soon caught the first hints of pink catching in the clouds.  The photograph of Tunnel Mountain, Mount Rundle and Sulphur Mountain above was taken at 8:10 using a 2 second exposure on f/16 at ISO 50.  The light soon caught the clouds hanging low above the mountains in the image below (8:13 AM; 0.8 seconds; f/16; ISO 50).  From there the reds and oranges started to splash across the sky above the Bow Valley.

By 8:16, the pinks had been driven off completely.  Now the trick was to hold the really bright circle of sky left of Mount Rundle (in the centre of the image below – 0.6 seconds; f/16; ISO 50)).  I was exposing off of that circle so that the highlights weren’t completely blown knowing that the RAW file captured by my camera would hold detail in the shadows elsewhere which I could recover in post.

I played with the focal length of several images during the exposure.  This created streaks in the photograph which served as interesting leading lines into the sunrise and Mount Rundle.  I shared my favourite one of these on the weekend (here) and below is another that I really liked as well.  This one has more brightness in the foreground so it has a different feel for me (8:20; 0.5 seconds; f/16; ISO 50).

 

By 8:20, the fire was waning and only golds and oranges outlined the silhouette of the mountains.  The photograph below being one of the last from my shoot (8:22; 0.3 seconds; f/16; ISO 50).

I jumped into a last frame just before the sun came over Rundle’s flank.   I had wanted to catch a sunstar as it crested the mountain but the clouds got in the middle as can happen.  That exposure was taken at 8:50 AM with a 4 second exposure (f/16 and ISO 100) using a heavy neutral density filter to get the extended shutter speed.  A beautiful morning in one of those places I love returning to again and again.  It’s rare that it doesn’t share a new look, or a few of them, with me each time.

 

 


Streaks of sunrise in Banff National Park

 

Sunrise streaked around Mount Rundle over the Vermilion Lakes in Banff National Park in Alberta, Canada yesterday. I arrived in darkness and had time to find a great spot that I have not photographed from before.  The clouds picked up the earliest light in the pre-dawn and the color in the sky continued to intensify.  For this image, I zoomed the focal length of the lens slightly during the 1/2 second exposure to create the lines of light leading to Rundle.


Autumn abstract

On the first day of October, I was in Banff National Park and found great fall colors across the Bow Valley.  I returned to Hillsdale Meadow along the Bow Valley Parkway where I expected the larch would be showing their best golds and yellows. I wasn’t disappointed!  For this image, I used a slow shutter to abstract the landscape similar to how I had done with the same stand of trees in July.  I moved the camera downwards during the 1/40th of a second exposure to exaggerate the vertical lines present in the golden trees and echoed in the evergreens in the mountainside behind.