Posts tagged “reflection

Winter in Lake Louise: snow, ice and water

ice-to-water-at-lake-louise-christopher-martin-3832

Last weekend I spent the morning looking for wildlife along the Bow Valley Parkway in Banff National Park.  I drove along, stopping several times for short hikes to get a view over the river valley or along a creek into the forest.  None of the animals graced me with their presence but the land made it a good morning nonetheless.  In Banff, the lakes are frozen but there was very little snow on the ground.  Halfway towards Lake Louise, the snow was more prevalent and when I got to the lake, the trees were heavy with snow, the ground was well-covered and winter was firmly set.  It has been a couple of years since I wandered along the lake shore in winter with camera in hand.  I enjoyed the time, working to create some images while listening to the multilingual hum from the other visitors as they came and went.  It was a good time to be up there to photograph.  The snow was falling gently, the river that drains out of the northeastern end of the lake was yet to freeze over and the clouds were moving fast so the peaks were in and out of view.  Lot’s of dynamic elements to weave together into a variety of images.  This was my favourite from a relaxed morning doing what I love.


A second night with the Aurora Borealis

an-evening-of-aurora-on-the-prairie-christopher-martin-7863

Only three days after I was able to watch a great showing by the Northern Lights, they came out to dance over the foothills again.  The clouds were heavier this time around and grew steadily through the night while I was out.  That set up for some backlighting by the aurora that looked really beautiful.  This time around, I started at the same small pond as before but then drive to a couple of different spots along Highway 1 before ending my night at the small lake beside the Sibbald Creek Trail (Highway 68) where it meets Township Road 252.

an-evening-of-aurora-on-the-prairie-christopher-martin-7848

an-evening-of-aurora-on-the-prairie-christopher-martin-7912

 

At first I was trying to get away from the cloud bank as it coalesced and then moved southwards and increasingly obscured my view of the night sky.  Soon I became a little hypnotized by the glow around and through the clouds so I settled down and enjoyed the moment.

an-evening-of-aurora-on-the-prairie-christopher-martin-8000

After 2am, the clouds broke up and seemed to return back to the north.  I was too tired to see how far they retreated and made my way home just before 3.

an-evening-of-aurora-on-the-prairie-christopher-martin-8038

an-evening-of-aurora-on-the-prairie-christopher-martin-8156


My first night with the Northern Lights this fall

an-albertan-autumn-aurora-christopher-martin-7487-2

September closed out with several strong Northern Lights displays that reached down to southern Alberta.  I was happy to make it out to the Foothills to photograph in the middle of the night for two of them.  These images are from the first foray which started around 11:30pm and continued rippling when I finally headed home around 2am on the 26th.

an-albertan-autumn-aurora-christopher-martin-7464
an-albertan-autumn-aurora-christopher-martin-7519
The clouds seemed to move in slow motion and picked up the glow from Cochrane differently as the night progressed.  Above, the aurora’s color palette shifted into pastels.  A few of the later images reminded me of cotton candy and were fantastic to watch slowly ripple then fade away.  I imagined these were tie-dyed waves rolling in both over the pond but also the sky they were reflecting.

an-albertan-autumn-aurora-christopher-martin-7596

an-albertan-autumn-aurora-christopher-martin-7523
an-albertan-autumn-aurora-christopher-martin-7621
an-albertan-autumn-aurora-christopher-martin-7575
Ursa Major and its Big Dipper were constant companions in the sky behind the dancing lights.  The stars would run in and out of the clouds, hiding at times and burning brightly at other times.  There was good magic to watch throughout.

an-albertan-autumn-aurora-christopher-martin-7645


A step towards winter: morning at Moraine Lake

moraine-chilled-in-summer-christopher-martin-3929

 

moraine-chilled-in-summer-christopher-martin-4046

I spent the morning at Moraine Lake today.  A cold front swept in last night and when I caught my first glimpse of the valley when I drove up, the snow line was visible amid the layers of forest, rock and cloud.

moraine-chilled-in-summer-christopher-martin-3803

At the lake, daybreak started cold with a steady drizzle of rain.  The blue water’s hue varied as the amount of light let through by the clouds changed.  I enjoyed the morning with the whole valley changing steadily.

moraine-chilled-in-summer-christopher-martin-3836

moraine-chilled-in-summer-christopher-martin-3963

moraine-chilled-in-summer-christopher-martin-4051

moraine-chilled-in-summer-christopher-martin-3943

moraine-chilled-in-summer-christopher-martin-3888


Images of the Aurora over the Elbow River

Albertan Aurora over the Elbow River - © Christopher Martin-5945-2

When the Northern Lights brightly lit up the sky on May 8th, I went out to a favourite spot along the Elbow River on the edge of Redwood Meadows.  The river there is dotted with sets of rocks near the shore which provide interesting elements and break up the reflection in an attractive way.  The landscape is beautiful and supported the main show in the sky above well.  The Aurora streamed across the sky from the northern horizon to well past the zenith.  The image below was taken with the camera pointing almost straight up.

Albertan Aurora - © Christopher Martin-5930

 

Albertan Aurora - © Christopher Martin-5979

Albertan Aurora - © Christopher Martin-6030

Albertan Aurora - © Christopher Martin-5938


Mother’s Day Aurora

Mother's Day Aurora Borealis - © Christopher Martin-5949

There was an intense auroral storm that started late on May 7th and rang in Mother’s Day with vibrant ripples and sheets until just before dawn.  This session of the Aurora Borealis was the most vibrant I’ve watched over the past five years.  For three hours I watched the sky being canvassed with impossibly bright streams of spray paint. I enjoyed watching them on the northern edge of my community along the banks of the Elbow River.  I thought it was a great start to Mother’s Day and certainly worth losing most of a good night’s sleep to watch the sky.


Mount Rundle reflected in Two Jack Lake

Mount Rundle in Two Jack Lake - © Christopher Martin-0160

Two Jack Lake’s surface was pretty calm on a beautiful blue sky morning in the Banff National Park two weeks ago.  That meant that Mount Rundle’s reflection was a bit skewed but I liked the look that suggested a fun house mirror.

Mount Rundle reflected in Two Jack Lake - © Christopher Martin-0160-3

I preferred the graphic look of black and white in this image.  For comparison, I included the original color version.


Swans moving ahead of dawn

Swans starting the morning - © Christopher Martin-4472

A week ago, shortly before sunrise I found this small flock of Tundra swans in a pond near the Bar U Ranch along Highway 22.  The birds had just started moving around breaking the ice that had formed on the water.  It was cold and quiet – I enjoyed watching the swans sort themselves out, shake off chill and step up onto the ice.

Swans starting the morning - © Christopher Martin-4499


Banff and the early morning blues

Banff and the morning blues - © Christopher Martin-1413

I love when I can get out early in the morning.  When it is pitch black as I get to my destination, I get excited as I wait for the first hint of light on the eastern horizon.  As the sky slowly brightens, there is a magical time ahead of any color in the sky where blues of almost every hue color the world.  I enjoyed one of these mornings on the shore of the Vermilion Lakes in the Banff National Park a couple of weeks ago.


Dawn at Two Jack Lake in the Banff National Park

Two Jack Sunrise in Banff - © Christopher Martin-2600

With the cooler days that have come with November, we have had some snow fall up in the mountains.  I went up to Two Jack Lake for sunrise on Friday to see how things would look with a bit of snow in the picture.  Facing Mount Rundle and her reflection in the water there was just the odd skiff of snow along the shoreline.  The color deepened in the sky for a few minutes before it started to color the clouds clinging to the mountain.

Two Jack Sunrise in Banff - © Christopher Martin-2610

Two Jack Sunrise in Banff - © Christopher Martin-2607-2

When I first arrived, the sun was still a while away from lighting up the clouds.  The darker scene, below, allowed for a longer exposure and more stretch to the clouds and water.

Two Jack Sunrise in Banff - © Christopher Martin-2585

I love this time of year when snow starts to build up and the scenic opportunities shift to one dominated by the white blanket that settles unevenly across the land.  Winter in the Banff National Park is probably my favourite time of the year there.  It is exciting to be on the edge of it.

Two Jack Sunrise in Banff - © Christopher Martin-2648

 

 


An autumn morning reflected in Upper Kananaskis Lake

Upper Kananaskis Lake - © Christopher Martin-0586

I started a great day in Kananaskis earlier this weekend walking along the shoreline of the Upper Kananaskis Lake in the Peter Lougheed Provincial Park.  At sunrise I was photographing a pair of moose, a mother and her calf, in a meadow and I ended up spending most of the morning at the Sarrail Falls.  However, when I parked near the boat launch at the lake, the soft light, subtle autumn accents, calm water and brilliant reflection of the mountains in the water mesmerized me for several minutes.  I had the lake to myself for a little while and enjoyed the beauty immensely.

Morning reflected in Upper Kananaskis Lake - © Christopher Martin-0593


Northern Lights in Bragg Creek

Aurora over Bragg Creek - © Christopher Martin-4180

After the Great gray owl and I parted ways it was very dark which helped me to notice a slight glow to the north.  I drove to a field where I could get a better view of the sky and found the Aurora Borealis was just starting to brighten off the horizon.  The lights rippled and stretched above valley for more than an hour.

Aurora over Bragg Creek - © Christopher Martin-4153

As they began to wane, I went to nearby Wild Rose Lake and was able to catch the Aurora’s reflection in the water.  As well as its glow mixing with the city light from Calgary.  This was an unexpected, but gratefully welcomed, surprise and end to an already great night photographing out in the country.

Aurora over Bragg Creek - © Christopher Martin-4262

Aurora over Bragg Creek - © Christopher Martin-4201

 

Aurora over Bragg Creek - © Christopher Martin-4220