Posts tagged “British Columbia

A trail of stars in the Okanagan

A set of long exposures taken in Osoyoos in late June this past summer.


Lightning over an abstracted Osoyoos

We went to the Okanagan earlier in the summer for a couple of days. One evening brought dark clouds in with the fading daylight. The low roll of thunder to the south announced the lighting storm that came in sincerely around midnight. Desirée and I photographed through the rain as the storm crossed directly overhead. A gazebo on the lakeshore provided cover. It was an impressive summer storm. This was one of the interesting shots from the night’s shooting.


Inflight fight

This shot of two bald eagles sparring in midair is one I have waited to capture for a long time. I felt extremely lucky to get this dynamic image with the wings flared, one claw wide open and the emotion in the top one’s face.

I have photographed bald eagles in many places over the years. They are dynamic, powerful, cunning, intelligent and emotional raptors who I never tire of watching at rest, in flight or on the hunt. This is one of my favorites of these incredible birds.


Archive images: Summer snowstorm – Kootenay National Park

Last June I traveled to Radium with my children.  On our travels there we passed through the Kootenay National Park during an early summer snow storm.  We stopped along the Kootenay River to photograph the icy blue water and bright green of the young forest being met by the white blizzard.


Happy Mother’s Day

2013 © Christopher Martin

I had a great day with the mothers in my life.  I hope you have enjoyed the same, great memories or are the recipient of a lot of heartfelt thank you.  You have the privilege to have such influence over your (and personally, on my) children.  It is lucky for them it is so very well placed. Happy Mother’s Day.

2013 © Christopher Martin


Eagles in the Columbia Valley

At the end of March, I had some time in Radium with my family.  I spent the mornings meandering along the Columbia River as well as some of the valley’s ponds and puddles.  This area of British Columbia seemed a couple of weeks further into spring than my home in Bragg Creek in Alberta.  Green was starting to show on the trees and in the grassland.  And on one lake, ice was still covering most of its surface.

The open water offered fish and the ice had some kind of insect, slug or some such on it.  Ravens and bald eagles were drawn in by both.  Over a couple of days I had some great opportunities to watch both and their occasional interactions.

 

 


Mornings at Radium’s Sinclair Canyon

My family spent a few days in Radium at the end of March.  I had not been that way since last fall.  Driving through the Sinclair Canyon’s narrow opening into the Columbia Valley this time, the steep rock walls grabbed my attention.

I went there early on three of the four mornings to play with those solid forms.  Lights from passing traffic traced bright lines through the long exposures.

The last morning was the earliest I arrived – a little after 4am.  I had some ideas for images with star trails through the gap in the canyon.  The clouds were not supportive of those ideas.  I watched them knit together and block the night sky as I was setting up.  Those ideas will get another chance later this spring I think.


A short spell with a few of Invermere’s belted kingfishers

It seems longer than a month ago when Kian and I went to the Columbia Valley in British Columbia for the Labour Day long weekend.

(please click any image to see a higher resolution version)

We had a great time skateboarding in Invermere, touring around Fairmont and even did a little swimming which was unreasonably cold for the late summer.

Photography wasn’t the focus of our trip but, unsurprisingly, I fit a little in here and there.  Easily the best of these was our walk along the narrow channel of the Columbia River where it meets the northern tip of Windermere Lake.  We found five kingfishers chattering, flying and occasionally diving along the water.

This juvenile alighted on the pillar near us as we were watching another one flying on the far side of the river.  He stayed for several minutes.  Drawing a flyby from one kingfisher but mostly left alone to scout for dinner before the sun set.


Flashback Friday – Khutzeymateen Mists

It’s been a couple of years since I last visited the Khutzeymateen Inlet.  A situation I hope to correct in the new year.  I may even lead a tour there next fall.  Thinking about the Khutzeymateen, it’s easy to relive the bear encounters (for me, those can be seen at this link, this one or this one) as they can be intimate in a way that I find unique and mesmerizing.  For whatever reason, I’ve been recalling the mists that rarely disappear in the valley.  It clings to the trees as the wind and sun push wisps, walls and blankets of fog up and down the steep mountainsides.  The continuous motion tears holes in these terrestrial clouds.  The view changes endlessly as they drag across the landscape exposing islands of forest here and a rocky shoreline there.

And, it certainly doesn’t hurt having these elements as the backdrop for bear photographs either!


Smoky Golden Moonrise

My son and I returned from a weekend hiking and camping with good friends in the Monashee Provincial Park in British Columbia on Monday night.  Wildfires have been a clear and present danger across the province for the whole summer and west of Golden we drove between two separate fires that were burning on mountainsides across the valley from each other.  The thick smoke obscured the flames and blocked out much of the sun.

It was powerful to directly observe something we have followed all summer remotely.  We stopped at a pullout briefly and then continued east towards home.  The day retreated and when we were nearing Golden, the moon rose above the forest and mountain ridge lines.

The smoke in the air from the fires, and likely others that were not visible to us, turned the sky a purple colour at dusk that moved quickly into a deep blue.

The nearly full moon shone brightly and had an orange cast to it.  Beauty from these wildfires that I enjoyed but that I would trade for rain there in a heartbeat.


Listen to the young

Mother and cub traveling along the Khutzeymateen Inlet towards the estuary

The theme for this year’s World Wildlife Day is listen to the young.  I love this celebration of animals in their natural environments and a focus on the voices that will guide our future.  Thinking about this day and this theme, my mind went to the Grizzlies in the Khutzeymateen and the mothers who raise their cubs in this bear paradise.

grizzlies-for-world-wildlife-day-christopher-martin-3176

These images are from a couple of different mother cub pairs.  When I was lucky enough to spend time with these bears, I loved hearing their voices.  I hope my children are able to say the same when they are my age.

Khutzeymateen Inlet, British Columbia, Canada - August 2013

I hope to give both my children and the bears the opportunity to share their voice.  I will always listen.


Waiting for the grizzlies

Khutzeymateen Inlet, British Columbia, Canada - June 2014

I’m heading up to Banff National Park tomorrow and the recent warm weather has me thinking about bears.  It’s far too early for them to wake up so I don’t expect to see any.  It did prompt me to look at the photographs from watching this mother Grizzly with her cub during a visit to the Khutzeymateen two years ago.  I can’t wait to see bears in both places starting later this spring.

 

2014 © Christopher Martin

2014 © Christopher Martin

Khutzeymateen Inlet, British Columbia, Canada - June 2014

A wary mother Grizzly checks for trouble further down the Khutzeymateen Valley