Mountains

Looking west along the Trans-Canada Highway

A pretty view caught my eye as I crossed over the Trans-Canada Highway near the Springbank airport west of Calgary.  The early sunsets of late autumn like this are great to enjoy.


A wander up to Boom Lake

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On the suggestion of a reader (thanks Jo Ann!), I hiked up to Boom Lake on the western edge of the Banff National Park near the British Columbia – Alberta border.  The trail is a gentle ~5km hike complicated only by a bit of snow, ice and mud given the time of year.  I enjoyed the walk through the trees and over the numerous streams.  The lake appears suddenly and is walled in on the far side by Boom Mountain.

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I would have thought the name came from the sound of the avalanches whose tears down the slopes can be seen in several places.  However, I found that the lake was named Boom owing to the driftwood created by the trees that are pushed into the water by the avalanches.

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Many of these logs are submerged but a large number have collected at the eastern end and where they poke out of the water suggested a logger’s boom to the person who formally named the lake in 1908.  I found that interesting as I did the lake itself.

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I scrambled over the rocks along the shore for a couple of kilometres while the wind, snow, sun all wrestled overhead, as they often do in these mountains.

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Winter’s teeth have yet to be bared with any sincerity so it felt more like mid-October than mid-November.  This little patch of vegetation drew my eye on the way down, the shock of color seemed a direct challenge to colder weather while the ice frozen over the leaf suggested its inevitability.  Needless to say, I enjoyed my random thoughts and musings as I strolled back down the trail.

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Autumn glow at Wedge Pond

Morning glow at Wedge Pond - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 17-40mm lens (at 17mm): 13 seconds at f/22 on ISO 400

With most of the aspens having turned gold in the lower reaches of Kananaskis Country around Bragg Creek, I was excited to get up to Wedge Pond to see how the colours were around the water and up towards Mount Kidd.  It was a cloudy morning but for a few minutes at dawn the sun broke through in a couple of places.  A strange, soft purple-pink glow illuminated the whole scene fleetingly.  I doubt I will ever get tired of visiting this place.


Nighttime at the boathouse on Emerald Lake

The boathouse on Emerald Lake - © Christopher Martin-4131

Bobbi and I got away to Emerald Lake last weekend for a little retreat.  The valley is in the Yoho National Park in British Columbia, about two and a half hours from Calgary.  We had a great time enjoying time on the land and enjoying the fine amenities offered by the Emerald Lake Lodge.  We have to thank both sets of grandparents for taking care of Kezia and Kian.  I spent most of the night out photographing around the water.  The image above is looking down the stairs to the boathouse where you can rent canoes and row boats to take out on the lake.  There was a wedding in the lodge where Cilantro’s restaurant is located across the bridge.  The lights from the party and the bridge illuminated the little cabin and the stacked boats.  Emerald Lake is a wonderful place to visit – we are already plotting our next return visit.


Storm Ridge

A storm threatened to cross over the western ridges in Kananaskis yesterday when I was in the Peter Lougheed Provincial Park.  The ridge above caught my eye and displayed the tension high up on the mountains.


Windswept across Mount Rundle’s jagged peak

Wind blows snow off of Mount Rundle’s eastern peak.  This was the vanguard of the storm that brought snow out onto the prairies over the weekend.


Back to the reflecting pools in Kananaskis

My friend and fellow photographer Jeff Rhude and I made it up to the reflecting pools which provide a beautiful mirror for Mount Kidd while it was still dark.  While dawn was still only a bit of light to the east, I used an exposure just a bit over two minutes long to see this early morning.

The wind was blowing in short blasts as we were waiting and once it was brighter I took an opportunity to show a bit of that in the blurred water.


Moraine Lake – a night and a day in the Valley of the Ten Peaks

Moraine Lake is one of the Canadian Rockies most iconic landscapes.  I have been there many times and it continues to share new magic with each visit. I was up on top of the rock pile with a couple of good friends for a quiet evening and we returned a few hours later for a cloudy sunrise.  Both times presented views of the Valley of the Ten Peaks and the lake that I had not seen previously.  I enjoyed them all immensely.

The evening watched as the clouds ran towards the horizon leaving open sky above the peaks that loom above the lake and curl west down the valley.  The soft light near sunset looked beautiful where it touched the peaks and provided a very subtle contrast to the deepening blues and greens that ushered in the night.

When I was crossing the stream where the lake most visibly drains out, the bright colors in the landscape’s palette had been wrung out so I was drawn to the speck of orange upstream.  I liked how this small information shelter’s log frame stood defiantly against the gloom.   At this point, some great clouds had stretched out above the water and they provided an abstract mirror of the river’s folds as revealed in this 13 second exposure.

When we returned around 5am, the clouds had staked out all four corners of the sky.  We watched breaks in the sky expectantly for more than an hour, taking us through sunrise without any light painting the peaks or the clouds curling around them.  We were joined by a hopeful couple from Japan and two Chinese ladies on top of the moraine.  Quiet chattering among the separate groups along with the occasional shutter click marking the time shuffling by.  It was nice, not the dramatic alpen glow or early light that I have seen before but another interesting side of this valley.

Around 6:30 a large break in the clouds developed in the east and 15 minutes later the first shafts of sunlight hit the mountains.  The light was still pretty warm and the drama I had been looking for unfolded for the next 45 minutes before the sun had risen too high for my landscape photography tastes.  I enjoyed watching the color in the lake swirl and change as the house lights of the day came up.  With stray clouds still wrapping peaks occasionally and the sunlight marching down the forest side of the lake, there was a lot to watch and to photograph.

Packing up, I retraced my steps down the path back towards the lodge.  Crossing the river once more, I was drawn in again.  This time the wet rocks were sparkling in the sunshine and I found the light on Yamnee (Mount Bowlen), Tonsa and Sapta (Mount Perren) particularly attractive. Breakfast was calling my friends (and me too – if I had been listening) and it was a good final image to complete this time with the lake, the valley and these wonderful peaks.