Posts tagged “reflections

A grand morning at the Vermilion Lakes

Time spent at the Vermilion Lakes in Banff National Park is always worthwhile.  It had been a while since I had watched day break there so on the weekend I drove up to do that.  I went very early so I was able to make some long exposures at the second lake before the morning arrived.

With sunrise threatening, other people wanting to enjoy the quiet spectacle came down the road to find their spot.  I didn’t mind adding a light streak into the scene!

When the clouds above the Fairholme Range to the east began to glow the day soon rushed in behind.  The lake dazzled again, as usual, reflecting Mount Rundle and framing the energetic sky above as it ran through dawn’s color palette.

A small group of photographers assembled along the shoreline nearby as the sky’s performance heightened.  The tone of the hushed murmurs suggested they were enjoying the moment.  I certainly was.


A wander up to Boom Lake

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On the suggestion of a reader (thanks Jo Ann!), I hiked up to Boom Lake on the western edge of the Banff National Park near the British Columbia – Alberta border.  The trail is a gentle ~5km hike complicated only by a bit of snow, ice and mud given the time of year.  I enjoyed the walk through the trees and over the numerous streams.  The lake appears suddenly and is walled in on the far side by Boom Mountain.

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I would have thought the name came from the sound of the avalanches whose tears down the slopes can be seen in several places.  However, I found that the lake was named Boom owing to the driftwood created by the trees that are pushed into the water by the avalanches.

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Many of these logs are submerged but a large number have collected at the eastern end and where they poke out of the water suggested a logger’s boom to the person who formally named the lake in 1908.  I found that interesting as I did the lake itself.

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I scrambled over the rocks along the shore for a couple of kilometres while the wind, snow, sun all wrestled overhead, as they often do in these mountains.

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Winter’s teeth have yet to be bared with any sincerity so it felt more like mid-October than mid-November.  This little patch of vegetation drew my eye on the way down, the shock of color seemed a direct challenge to colder weather while the ice frozen over the leaf suggested its inevitability.  Needless to say, I enjoyed my random thoughts and musings as I strolled back down the trail.

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Sunrise reflected in Emerald Lake

Sunrise reflected in Emerald Lake - © Christopher Martin-0162

Our family stayed at the Emerald Lake Lodge on the weekend. It is a beautiful lake ringed by peaks including Emerald Mountain and Mount Burgess but can prove tricky for sunrise photography.  I had two mornings where I was able to watch dawn arrive.  I really enjoyed the stillness of the water and its mirroring of the pastel sky.  Both mornings ushered in great days for the kids, Bobbi and I.

Sunrise reflected in Emerald Lake - © Christopher Martin-0148

The boat house across from the lodge is a beautiful, rustic spot that I love to photograph around when I’m visiting.  I found a few different looks this time around.

Sunrise reflected in Emerald Lake - © Christopher Martin-0140

Sunrise reflected in Emerald Lake - © Christopher Martin-0342

Sunrise reflected in Emerald Lake - © Christopher Martin-0142


Among the clouds at Wedge Pond

Moutn Kidd cloaked - 2013 © Christopher Martin

I was up in Kananaskis a few days ago to explore the recently opened stretch of Highway 40 up to the Highwood Pass.  Leaving home in the dark, I arrived at Wedge Pond just as light was creeping into the eastern edge of the sky.

Peeking at the peaks of Mount Kidd - 2013 © Christopher Martin

We had several days of rain preceding this visit so I was unsure what the weather would be like in the mountains.  The reports called for partly sunny with showers.  From experience, that can mean anything from empty blue skies to heavy, wet gray clouds.  I don’t mind either so I was happy to head up and find out.  That morning the mist was swirling above the pond and rising up to meet the low hanging clouds that were stuffed into the valley.  I trotted down to the water’s edge and moved along keeping an eye on Mount Kidd.  The mountain catches the early pre-dawn Alpen glow and can be spectacular right through sunrise.  The view over Wedge and up to Kidd whispered of something good that might come and I was happy to move around, watching and waiting.

Sunrise at Wedge Pond - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Dawn along the shore - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Seven minutes later, pink light was hitting a few of the higher clouds.  The lower clouds were breaking up and it seemed like a clear view of the mountain was coming forward.

Dawn sneaks a look down at Wedge Pond - 2013 © Christopher Martin

It didn’t – the clean view was swallowed up by the clouds as the rich colours on Mount Kidd came in.  I didn’t mind at all as a few fleeting openings afforded beautiful views of one or two of the peaks for the next couple of minutes.

Morning in the mountains - 2013 © Christopher Martin

I have not had such a dynamic encounter with the weather up at Wedge Pond and I had a great time.  It was fun to play around with the moodiness under the clouds balanced (and thrown out of balance) with the sunrise opening above.  I’m enjoying the late resurgence of summer we are enjoying but I found myself looking forward to the fall colours that always look so wonderful in this special place.  I will be there and would be very happy if these clouds returned then too.


Dawn at the Lion’s Gate Bridge

The Lion waits for dawn - 2013 © Christopher Martin

(as always, please click on any image to open a higher resolution version)

In March, I spent a weekend in Vancouver photographing birds, Granville Market and a few other things with a good friend.  On one of the mornings we headed down to Stanley Park around 4:30 AM to see about sunrise.  We walked to the seawall along the Burrard Inlet and worked for a while with the lights of North Van across the water.

Dawn on the Burrard Inlet - 2013 © Christopher Martin

As dawn came in, we moved slowly towards the Lion’s Gate Bridge and I had a lot of fun working with this dominant structure.  I was very happy that they left the bridge lights on right through sunrise.  I used to spend a lot of time exploring the park when I went to school in Vancouver but this was one of only a few times that I have photographed there.  It is a beautiful place to spend time – with or without a camera.

Under the Lion - 2013 © Christopher Martin

With morning came the runners that pile on miles along the pathways year round.  I enjoyed working them into a few photographs before packing up for breakfast.

Stanley Park - morning run 2013 © Christopher Martin


Rippling on the water

A pond of abstraction - 2013 © Christopher Martin

From a small pond in Granville Island where a light rain was falling. The circular ripples created by the raindrops hitting the water distorted the reflections of trees above.


Wood ducks at the Reifel Bird Sanctuary

Among the reflections - © Christopher Martin-2413-2

I have always loved the crazy colours and patterns displayed by the male Wood duck (Aix sponsa).  They have been somewhat elusive in the areas I am typically out photographing wildlife.  When I was at the George C. Reifel Migratory Bird Sanctuary a couple of weeks ago, I came across a raft of them paddling around a chain of small ponds sheltered by overhanging branches above and reeds behind.

Under branches - © Christopher Martin-1780

A quick look back - © Christopher Martin-2315

The ripples in the water and the distorted reflections served as a chaotic yet still suitable background to photograph these beautiful birds.  I stopped and enjoyed almost an hour of watching these fellows swim, waddle and chase one another as well as their better halves.  The weather picked a great time to cloud over and the diffused, even light allowed those colours and the textures in the feathers to own the stage in several of the images.

Out of the reeds - © Christopher Martin-2145

Paddling through reality - © Christopher Martin-2061

One of the last ones I photographed before moving on caught my eye as it hopped out of the water onto a log jutting out of the water.  After shaking himself off, he cocked his head and fixed me with this one-eyed stare.  The stare, his body posture along with the tail feathers slightly askew suggested a bit of a character and he was a fitting model to finish this duck encounter with.

Strike a pose... Vogue - © Christopher Martin-2444


Underwater at Ke’e

There is a nice spot to snorkel just off of Ke’e Beach on Kaua’i’s north shore.  The fish school in decent numbers and there is often a chance of seeing sea turtles.  Before returning to Canada we went up to Ke’e for one last afternoon on the beach and an evening photographing the sunset down the Na Pali.

The water was choppy from high surf coming over the reef which usually breaks down the waves.  This made swimming with the kids a more involved process than normal and shortened any snorkelling.  I still went out and photographed along the calm side of the coral reef for sometime close to an hour.

Fish with coral reflected

The fish were more scarce on the day, maybe due to the turbulence, but it was still pretty busy down below.  I had fun photographing individual fish within their environment.

From down below, even looking up was beautiful.

The sky from under the surface


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Sand reflections in Kaua’i

 

Between the sand and the surface

I love the way light diffracts, focuses and reflects under water.  During my swims with an underwater camera I had a lot of fun playing near the shore.  This beach near Kapa’a is called Baby Beach as it has a nice reef that breaks the waves creating a safe place for kids to swim.  These silvery fish are curious and they did a nice job filling in the middle of this photograph.


Jasper’s landscapes in winter

The week I spent in the Jasper National Park at the end of October coincided with a heavy snowstorm which gripped the park area for most of the week and gave winter a firm grasp over it.  I was there to photograph wildlife with a small group but stole a few opportunities to capture the landscape freshly trimmed with its winter coat.

During a scout along the Athabasca River looking for tracks, I stopped to work into this scene for a few minutes.  With a bit of time to find something to work with in the foreground, waterproof(ish) boots so I could set up out in the water a bit and a polarizer all helped to realize what I had in mind.  Namely, a subtle winter landscape in this national park.

The last day had some of the heaviest snow in the morning but also afforded the only sunshine of the week.  This image was along the river’s edge east of Jasper a little while before the clouds started to knit back together.


Wildlife Around the Pond in Redwood Meadows

There is a small pond just across the road from the firehall in Redwood Meadows.  Spring is when wildlife is most active in this stretch of water.

It regularly overflows its northern edge at that time of the year and then fills up a much larger area, not even close to a lake but it becomes a much larger pool.  This year has had a fair bit of rain so the pond has stayed beyond its borders for the summer so far.  The other evening, the light was really rich and warm.  With the hot temperatures, it was a draw for the animals.  I was happy to watch them for a few minutes.

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In the Oak Creek Canyon along the West Fork Trail

 

I went for a hike in late afternoon along the West Fork Trail which starts a few miles north of Sedona.  The trail follows Oak Creek as it runs against the contours of the steep Oak Creek Canyon walls.  These steep walls keep the heat found in Sedona at this time of year at bay and I found it to be a really nice temperature for a walk.  The trail itself is fairly level all the way up to the very last stretch so it was less a hike and more of a walk.  The forest with patches of wildflowers, many types of lush trees, birdsong and chittering insects was very enjoyable.  I spent a couple of hours on the trail, stopping to photograph a small outpost of butterflies, reflections of the scenery in pools formed in the shallows of slabs of red rock and everything else that caught my eye.  I saw this beautiful overhang of rock drawing the eye out to the greenery along the trail on my way up but it was a bit too bright for the image I had in mind.  When I came back that way on my back down, the light had cooperated and I was able to create what I was looking for.