Work

De-icing planes at YYC – revisited

De-icing planes at YYC - 2014 © Christopher Martin-070025

I originally published one photograph of the patterns of steam created by workers de-icing planes in January 2014, the day after I took the picture when I arrived in Arizona.  I processed the image quite minimally as I believe I was working off of an iPad and had limited time to work on the images.  Last year, a more true to life, and to my eye more pleasing, version was recognized in the CBRE Urban Photographer of the Year competition.  This version required some processing as RAW files are quite flat and high contrast images can require a bit of work to bring them out.

De-icing planes at YYC - 2014 © Christopher Martin-070525

For a recent competition I entered, I submitted a series of different images from the same time.  I liked the abstract quality of the steam created by the patterns and swirls, backlit by the just risen sun.  I wanted to share those here – with the break in the freezing temperatures this morning, I thought it was a nice reminder of just how cold winter can be in Alberta!

De-icing at YYC - 2014 © Christopher Martin-070825

De-icing at YYC - 2014 © Christopher Martin-072725

De-icing planes at YYC - 2014 © Christopher Martin-070725

De-icing at YYC - 2014 © Christopher Martin-071425

 

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A few more scenes from Shangri-La’s countryside

Shangri-La Countryside - © Christopher Martin-6948-2

The countryside surrounding Shangri-La is a rural landscape of small farms, fields and villages divided by densely forested hills, soaring mountains and deeply carved rivers.  When I was in China last month I spent a couple of days driving the narrow roads that connect these places.  These are a selection of these scenes as I experienced them.

Shangri-La Countryside - © Christopher Martin-7202

Shangri-La Countryside - © Christopher Martin-7329

Shangri-La Countryside - © Christopher Martin-7110

Shangri-La Countryside - © Christopher Martin-7466

Shangri-La Countryside - © Christopher Martin-7461

Shangri-La Countryside - © Christopher Martin-0026

Shangri-La Countryside - © Christopher Martin-9077

Shangri-La Countryside - © Christopher Martin-6930

Shangri-La Countryside - © Christopher Martin-6941-2

Shangri-La Countryside - © Christopher Martin-8310

Shangri-La Countryside - © Christopher Martin-8321

Shangri-La Countryside - © Christopher Martin-8318

Shangri-La Countryside - © Christopher Martin-7176

 


Covering Shwe Dagon in gold

Gilding Shwe Dagon - © Christopher Martin-2895

The Shwedagon Zedi Daw is a nexus point for Myanmar’s Buddhists.  It’s history goes back more than 2600 years and it is an amazing place of humanity, faith and spirituality.  The main stupa is sheathed in gold foil as are many of the parapets and other buildings on the grounds.  I went there twice when I visited Myanmar in 2010 and think I could return many more times and always find new things catching my eye.  On my second visit, I watched these workers gilding a new, or maybe restored, tower.  It was a hot day and while one gentleman found a ball cap to be sufficient protection, the other preferred a more encompassing head cover.  This was detailed work and they were attentive to the task at hand.  I had to wait a little while until one of them looked up from the tower and glanced out over the crowds walking around Shew Dagon.


De-icing at YYC

De-icing at YYC - 2014 © Christopher MartinCanon 5D Mark III + 500mm f/4 lens: 1/6400 seconds at f/4 on ISO 320

A member of the ground crew at the Calgary International Airport does the critical work of de-icing the airplane during a cold sunrise well below freezing in Alberta, Canada.


Still life from the Bar U Ranch

The Bar U Ranch is a national historic site in southwest Alberta.  A nice drive from Calgary and a great place for photography with the clock turned back over a hundred years.

I was revisiting this photograph that I made last summer.  The door to this bunkhouse was open with all of these pieces of ranch hand gear laid out so that it seemed like one of them could walk up any moment.  Just one of many interesting scenes they have created at the ranch for visitors to see and feel how life on the western frontier was lived.


In Alvise’s Workshop

Alvise Doglioni and I finished the first of a couple of meetings to photograph him in his workshop in Priddis, Alberta for a piece that we are working on.  He is a master craftsman in woodworking and woodcarving and it was nice to get this project started.  That story is a ways off from being told but I did make a couple of images using the beautiful light streaming in through the windows.

If you have an interest in wood artwork and furniture – whimsical and functional in alternating measures – check out Alvise’s website.


Downtown: commuter and driver

I am enjoying the people I meet and see during my commutes into and out of downtown.  The photographs of these two gentlemen drew my attention when I was looking through my recent pictures.  The driver was a quick shot taken as my car passed by a bus – I didn’t realize that the bus driver was looking at me.  It certainly makes the picture.  The man waiting for the train had a stately, refined manner which stood out from the standard commuter.  I am taking queues from this man’s sartorial tastes.

More to come from the commuting into Calgary’s core…

 

If you are on Facebook, check out my new photography page (and “like” it – if you do indeed like it)


Waiting in Gastown


A photograph made in Gastown in Vancouver, British Columbia.  The restaurant is the Water St. Cafe and I love how the subject of the image, the waiter, is separated from the street scene by these large panes .  I photographed this image a couple of years ago with my old Canon XT and converted it into black and white immediately back then. I had not looked at it much since then but it was stored in one of the image portfolios on my phone. This afternoon I was playing with an app (TiltShift) on my iPhone which applies tilt and shift effects to any accessible image.  So, with adjustment of the point of focus and then selecting the amount of blur, I came up with a new version of this archived photo that I quite like.

 


Mandalay: an afternoon in a street market

Throughout Asia, markets are a big part of daily life in a way very different from our malls.  I romanticize them a bit when I’m touring through my memories of trips to and living in Thailand, China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore and Myanmar.   However, every time I return, I head straight for the nearest night market, food bazaar, or whatever to get a feel for the place and the people.  Just about a year ago, I was in Mandalay in central Myanmar and in a bid to escape the afternoon heat, I lingered in this corridor set off to the side of a very large market in the city.

Just a really cool spot to spend a couple of hours.  The kids were a ton of fun but pretty elusive – they welcomed me to take their picture but weren’t interested in staying still for even a fraction of a second.  No worries, we shared some laughs and I had some really good tea from the lady with the pink food (but I didn’t give that one a try).


Forgotten Vehicles: photographs from around the farm

I grew up in a small valley in southwestern British Columbia.  Our house faced a large meadow bounded by a creek on one side and the treed flanks of a mountain on the other three sides.  The meadow had once been a field with several orchards and the behind the house were the remnants of a farm with barns, corrals and sheds.  The buildings were worn down, leaning at odd angles but all held their own treasure of rusted tools, missing floorboards, broken machinery and weathered vehicles.  It was a paradise for a kid and I loved that place.  We lived there for about eight years and I know there were a few places I still didn’t fully explore.  Living on the prairies now, I get to revisit the same objects as they dot the landscape – abandoned farmhouses, vehicles both hidden and exposed as well as many other iconic farm “things”.  I’m working on a project tying the photographs to the people behind these farms – let’s just say that is a LONG term project.  However, it’s a lot of fun making the photographs in and around the farms – a good escape to the boy I still am.

I will post more on the buildings, tools, etc. from around the farm but for this one, I’ll restrict the images to vehicles.  These images are from places across Alberta and in eastern Saskatchewan, linger over the picture for the particular location.  As always, click on any of the pictures to jump to a full page version.

Alas, this last vehicle, a combine harvester,  is not forgotten but I like it so please allow the exception.

 


Street Vendor – a boy in Yangon

This boy was on the edge of Chinatown in Yangon, Myanmar.  He was arranging the deep fried snacks in his basket and maybe taking a short break before continuing on.  I presumed that he was heading around the corner towards a large crowd was watching dragon dancers perform but did not follow him.  Looking at this photograph again, almost a year later, I was struck by a number of the little details – the flip flop sandals, the crease in his shirt collar, the concrete blocks forming the sidewalk, even his raised pinky.  It was an interesting scene to revisit.


November on the Prairies

It’s funny the difference a few days can make.  That’s true year round in this part of the world but I thought these pictures highlight how quickly things can change.

These winter photographs were made this afternoon in Springbank on the first day in over a week where it wasn’t frigidly cold (still -20 celsius).

And this fall harvest shot below was from just before Remembrance Day near Cochrane.  These two farms are about 20 kilometers apart.  I think this farmer is pretty glad he got his crop pulled up when he did.