Posts tagged “bear

Bear scratching in Yellowstone

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Update: Following friendly inquiries by Morgan and John, I had a closer look at my photos of this bear and agree this is a female and not a male.  I always appreciate comments, corrections and questions – thank you both!  I have corrected the text below to refer to her rather than him (anthropomorphic license to some but one I consistently prefer to take).

I made my first foray into Yellowstone National Park last May and enjoyed exploring new terrain – of which there is much and varied.  The wildlife was abundant and I was lucky to have several encounters with bears that were fantastic.  One of these was with this Black bear in the Tower-Roosevelt area.  She had emerged into this clearing from a sheer cliff that leads down to the Yellowstone River (I would have loved to watch her scramble up the bank!)  She shook herself out as she walked across wet morning grass and stopped under this tree.  From the worn out ground under the tree, I think she and other bears frequent this spot often.  The bear raised up on her hind legs and proceeded to enjoy a back scratching session for a couple of minutes.

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With that important morning exercise completed, she shuffled through the grass munching on wildflowers before scrambling over a haphazard collection of fallen tree trunks.  The bear’s small vale was just below a river viewpoint pullout so she had drawn a large crowd by this point.  I enjoyed the quieter time earlier and left while she was still grazing amongst the deadfall.

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Autumn Grizzly in the park

autumn-grizzly-in-the-banff-national-park-christopher-martin-4206Autumn strode confidently into the Banff National Park at the beginning of September.  While some berries and flowers were still producing their best work of the year, much of the foliage has started to turn with grass yellowing and leaves falling.  It is a beautiful season in the park (but I would have to say that I like them all!).  A couple of weeks ago I found this Grizzly bear in the Bow Valley between Lake Louise and the Castle Junction.  It moved steadily through the palette of fall colors, eating berries as it found them.

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It left this hillside meadow after a while and melted into the forest.  I caught sight one more time and could see it watch me for a second before continuing on and easily disappearing again.

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A beast in the bushes

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When Kian and I left Jasper we headed home via Highway 93A, which runs parallel to the main road but was much quieter and proved to be a great start to the end of our boys weekend in the national park.

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We spotted this black bear almost a kilometre ahead and it was kind enough to wait by the roadside until we drew near.  When we pulled up beside, the bear had settled onto a Buffalo berry bush.  The berries were pulled free, the bear slowly moved forward and my son and I watched as the moments crawled past.  It was cool to share that experience with Kian.

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A backscratching bear’s dance

Backscratching bear dancer - © Christopher Martin-9297

I visited Jasper National Park for a couple of days over the Victoria Day long weekend.  The park has a different feel (both are great – just different) from Banff and I always look forward to spending time there.   I plan to share a few stories of time I spent with some of the magnificent wildlife there but will start with a really fun moment.

Black bear shuffle and stare - © Christopher Martin-9121

This black bear was grazing in the ground cover of a stretch of open forest when I found him.  I watched him scratch, sniff and chew on shrubs, flowers and roots for several minutes and then he sauntered over to this small tree.

Backscratching bear dancer - © Christopher Martin-9279

Rearing up on his hind legs, he seemed really happy to rub his back up and down against the spiky needles.  I’m not sure how much scratching he felt with his thick coat so maybe it was more for the scent or to shake off some insects.  No matter the reason, it was cool to see a bear dancing for his own reasons.

Backscratching bear dancer - © Christopher Martin-9286

Backscratching bear dancer - © Christopher Martin-9287

Backscratching bear dancer - © Christopher Martin-9300

 

 

 

 


A Grizzly’s water walk

Grizzly on a water walk - 2014 © Christopher Martin

This wonderful bear strode through the estuary during low tide in the Khutzeymateen Inlet.  June is a time when all of the bears are wary of one another’s intentions but that didn’t stop this lady from walking down the centre of the river.  I saw her a couple of times during our trip into the provincial park but this was the only time where she was in the water.


A Banff Grizzly on the move

A summer's walk - 2014 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII and 300mm lens: 1/1600 second at f/4 on ISO 2000

I spent one morning in Banff on the weekend and came across a male Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) along the Bow Valley Parkway.  He spent some time in one roadside meadow chewing on a everything green he could see.

Stepping across the line - 2014 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DII and 70-200mm lens at 122mm: 1/250 second at f/4 on ISO 800

Before long, he crossed the road and then headed into the trees leaving a group of vehicles and their occupants behind.  I hoped he was heading towards a larger meadow about a mile east and drove there to wait and see.

2014 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII and 70-200mm lens at 149mm: 1/1000 second at f/4 on ISO 2000

Apparently the dandelions and lush vegetation were calling him and after not too long a wait he strode out of the forest and continued chowing down.  He stayed there for more than an hour, disappearing briefly a couple of times before finally heading deeper into the shadows.

Meadow lunch - 2014 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII and 500mm lens: 1/500 second at f/4 on ISO 1600

Although winter felt slow to leave, the greenery now seems abundant and makes me hopeful this bear and the other animals in the park will enjoy a long summer feast.

In the garden patch - 2014 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII and 500mm lens: 1/1600 second at f/4 on ISO 1000


A quick look back from a bear

Driving up to the Highwood Pass in Kananaskis this black bear ran across the road a few hundred yards ahead of me.  I pulled up where it had climbed the bank and saw it looking at me from the forest’s edge.  A quick look and then it ran into the woods.

That reminded me of a slightly longer encounter I had in the spring near Radium with another black bear.  The dandelions that spring up in thick carpets on the roadside fields draw the bears and this one was not deterred by a steady downpour.

The wet fur provided a great sheen and defined the coat well.

 

On the same trip through the Kootenay National Park in early June, I saw a second black bear grazing in another meadow.  This one was a beautiful ginger colour – really beautiful.  I’m hoping to get back into the mountains to enjoy the autumn season and see a bear or two soon.


Grizzly bear cub and a couple of trees

I was in Jasper photographing for a few days with a couple of good friends.  We had one day where we were able to get some glass on two separate mothers with their cubs.  One family was just the mother and her cub and it was this cub who proved to be an adept tree climber.

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The pair was snacking on berries when the little one trotted over to a tall tree and then shot up the trunk.  It stopped about 40′ up and looked around for a bit.  At that point we weren’t sure whether there would be a descent down the bark or a fall.

It was amazing to watch the bear when it decided to come down.  I can only describe it as a vertical slide and a very quick one.  The cub went back to mom and they foraged along for a while.  Then it climbed another tree, stayed up to enjoy the bird’s-eye view and then slid back down.  Very fast, very natural and really a treat to see this rascal go.

On the ground the bear did not appear agitated so I believe it was climbing out of curiosity and, possibly, just for the fun of it.


Banff Wildlife: Grizzly #64 and her cubs

 

This cub is one of three two-year olds growing up in the Banff National Park under their mother’s attentive guidance and watchful gaze. I spoke with one of the conservation officers on Sunday and he knew much about this little family.  I was happy to hear that the mother is roughly twenty years old.  When Dave told me that it made me hopeful that her experience will help her bring all three cubs to maturity.  A great addition to the overall Grizzly population in the park.  First, a bit about this encounter and then some details about the mother bear and her story.

The snow the day before had given way to rain by Sunday morning.  The wet hairs glistened as did the foliage which made added some interest to the images.  The family was grazing near the roadside but were still in pretty deep forest so the dark scene was a puzzle to work with.  We were able to stay in the car and use long lenses to fill the frames with the bears.  A safe way to encounter bruins and they carried on with very little intrusion from our car and the couple of others that came and went. 

The bears laid down at one point for a short snooze.  Two of the little bears curled in with their mom while the third draped over her shoulder hump.  I didn’t have a good angle on that moment but it was really nice just to see.   After about half an hour, the bears moved on shuffling deeper into the forest and disappeared quickly. 

 

Bear #64 is a well-known bear in the Banff area.  John Marriott wrote a post that touches on her while telling the tragic story of the loss of bears #109 and #108.  108 was five-and-a-half years old when she was hit by a car on July 11, 2011.  109 was her twin sister and had been run over by a train the year before.  If I had a wish I would spend it on helping these young cubs growing to an age where my kids are driving up on their own to photograph them with their own cubs.    


2011 Favourite Photographs – Wildlife

I’ve been carving out a little time to review my photography over the past year.  It’s been nice to recall some good adventures and revisit some of my favourites from 2011.  I spent a fair bit of time sitting in the snow waiting, driving back roads looking and hiking game trails exploring so it was a great year.  I crossed paths with a few animals and here are my favourite images from those encounters.

This moose and her calf were grazing along Highway 40 west of Highwood Pass in Kananaskis.  She was beautiful and here I was able to make a nice side portrait of her as she watched her young one prancing around.

An early spring hike found me exchanging glances with a large female moose after I heard rustling in this stand of slender branches and saw her a few meters away.

I had some bull moose encounters throughout the year and the hour I walked parallel to this pair in West Bragg Creek near Wild Rose was a highlight.

Where we live we have a lot of opportunity to see white-tailed and mule deer.  I photographed many groups and individuals of both over the last year.  This white-tailed buck was wary of me at first but after passing his sniff test he returned to his wandering.

The mule deer at the edge of the forest was flanked by another, possibly younger deer, deeper in the woods.  They stared at me for a minute before I drove on and they leapt further into the trees.

The Great Gray Owls are present throughout the woods and meadows that I often wander through but they seem to appear only when they want to be seen.  I was able to have some long encounters throughout the year and I continue to be amazed by these magical creatures.

I wanted to photograph more bears this year and I spent a lot of time reading about behaviour, habits and their movements through the year.  It paid off and I was able to enjoy some very good encounters where they were not threatened by my presence and I was able to photograph them safely.

This grizzly encounter was a surprise.  Our group was busy photographing the raw wilderness in the Tonquin Valley on the eastern shore of Amethyst Lake when we noticed this boar walking over the rocks and bushes a couple hundred feet away.  He saw us at the same time and though he didn’t seem threatened, he wasn’t interested in getting any closer either.  He made a quarter turn and walked along the shoreline away from us.

This black bear cub was feasting in a dandelion meadow in the Kootenay National Park in eastern British Columbia.

These mountain goats were taking a break from their mineral foraging to look over the river valley along the Icefields Parkway in the Jasper National Park.

The warm springs along the Vermilion Lakes in the Banff National Park opened a stretch of water where an American Dipper came to reflect and enjoy a nice bath.

The ripples from this American Coot distorted the reflection of the dark telephone pole above a pond in Springbank.

The Sula sula (Red-footed booby) birds in Kilauea on Kaua’i, Hawai’i were great fliers that were a lot of fun to watch at the National Refuge there.

This last one is just a brief glimpse of a humpback whale that Bobbi and I had on a sail we went on in Kaua’i.  I like the abstract aspects of the image overall and it is the source of one of my goals which is to photograph more marine wildlife in the coming year.

I felt sad banishing the runner-up images back to the library without giving them a chance to stretch a bit so I’ve put them into a slideshow here. Have a look at the near misses if you are so inclined.  Thanks for taking a stroll through 2011 with me.

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Kootenay National Park Black Bears: Mother and Cub

In June, we drove to Invermere, BC for a long weekend.  My drove through the Kootenay National Park on our way to Radium and the Columbia River Valley.  The dandelions were in full bloom in the meadows and the ditches along Highway 93 leading into Radium so I had high hopes of seeing some bears on the way.  With the bright overcast making the wet grass and flowers shine, I knew the light would be a bit of a challenge but when we found this Black bear (Ursus americanus) mother and very young cub all worries about available light, blown out grass and shiny wet fur flew far out of mind.  Bobbi and both kids were there so it was special to watch them together.

Click on the images to see larger, and sharper, versions of each image on its own page.

Everyone around stayed in their cars and the bears carried on with minimal concern.  After half an hour, the cub sauntered back behind the trees.  Mom stayed close to the forest’s edge but grazed for a few more minutes before joining her baby.


Cinnamon Black Bear in the Canadian Rockies

Between Banff and Radium, in the Kootenay National Park, I found this young bear grazing on dandelions on a steep hillside at the forest’s edge.   Probably three years old given the size but still impressive in appearance and bearing.  I was happy to have a long lens to bring this one close.

This subspecies of the black bear has even earned its own formal name, Ursus americanus cinnamomum.  They are beautiful animals no matter the color but it was great to see one that had such a distinctive rust hued coat.  With the rain, the colors really saturated and created a sheen that worked at some angles but was a challenge at other ones.