Posts tagged “reflections

Wildlife Around the Pond in Redwood Meadows

There is a small pond just across the road from the firehall in Redwood Meadows.  Spring is when wildlife is most active in this stretch of water.

It regularly overflows its northern edge at that time of the year and then fills up a much larger area, not even close to a lake but it becomes a much larger pool.  This year has had a fair bit of rain so the pond has stayed beyond its borders for the summer so far.  The other evening, the light was really rich and warm.  With the hot temperatures, it was a draw for the animals.  I was happy to watch them for a few minutes.

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In the Oak Creek Canyon along the West Fork Trail

 

I went for a hike in late afternoon along the West Fork Trail which starts a few miles north of Sedona.  The trail follows Oak Creek as it runs against the contours of the steep Oak Creek Canyon walls.  These steep walls keep the heat found in Sedona at this time of year at bay and I found it to be a really nice temperature for a walk.  The trail itself is fairly level all the way up to the very last stretch so it was less a hike and more of a walk.  The forest with patches of wildflowers, many types of lush trees, birdsong and chittering insects was very enjoyable.  I spent a couple of hours on the trail, stopping to photograph a small outpost of butterflies, reflections of the scenery in pools formed in the shallows of slabs of red rock and everything else that caught my eye.  I saw this beautiful overhang of rock drawing the eye out to the greenery along the trail on my way up but it was a bit too bright for the image I had in mind.  When I came back that way on my back down, the light had cooperated and I was able to create what I was looking for.


Sunset at Cathedral Rock

(please click on any image to open a higher resolution version)

Bobbi and I are in Sedona, Arizona for a few days this week.  We drove into the town yesterday and went exploring down at the Red Rock Crossing for a couple of hours until nightfall.  I haven’t been here before so Bobbi is in the role of guide and I am the happy follower.

We went to this location which is split by Oak Creek.  The cool waters drew a number of small groups and families offering respite from the 42°C (108°F) heat of the day.  We hiked along the riverside trails and photographed reflections in the water, the towering red rocks that backstop the area as well as a couple of lizards.  A beautiful place to escape the heat.

What makes this place a destination for landscape photographers are the views of Cathedral Rock and the opportunity to work with its reflections in the creek.  At sunset the last sunlight of the day makes the rocks glow.  Last night did not disappoint and I had a wonderful time playing with the elements at hand.


Rocky Mountain Landscapes: Dawn at the Vermilion Lakes in Banff

It was -14°C on Sunday morning when I walked down the path to the shore of the first Vermilion Lake just west of Banff.  The lakes are largely frozen over after several days of cold weather.  A great benefit to birds, photographers and other wild creatures are the hot springs that bleed into the lake from different spots around the lakes.  For photographers, the warm springs keep patches of water ice-free throughout the winter.

I have a couple of favourite locations across the three lakes including this one.  Arguably it has the best view of Mount Rundle.  On this morning, the warm water had cut a winding path out across the lake and I enjoyed playing with the composition of this element with the sky, the mountain and all of the reflections.  When I arrived it was still dark but the sky was showing great promise.  The clouds pushed up towards Rundle and parked there as the sun neared the horizon catching the warm light beautifully.  A very nice place to photograph landscapes on a very nice morning.


Watery Reflections of South Carolina

Ran across some beautiful, warm evening light when I was in North Myrtle Beach a few days ago.  I was walking on the boardwalk around Prices Swamp Run and the reflections in the rippling water were beautiful.

 


Myrtle Beach: Nighttime over the Intracoastal Waterway

I was in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina for a few days last week.  Great weather and very good golf courses.  The area is bounded by the ocean and the land off the water has been recovered from swamp.  I had a good vantage point of a major canal, the Intracoastal Waterway, that is about a mile back from the beach and runs parallel to the ocean for a very long stretch.  At night, the sodium vapour lights provided most of the illumination and when mixed with stray Christmas lights and other types of lighting made for some interesting landscapes.

This boat, The Barefoot Princess 5,  looked like a half-hearted re-creation of an old sternwheeler – without the wheel. Designed for sightseeing, it has maximum seating but at the expense of a bit of character.  At night though it looked very nice with its blue lights and the street lights streaming through the decks.


Calgary’s Downtown Core at Sunset

I was out on a windy hill east of Calgary’s downtown core on Monday night photographing the city center at sunset. There were some great clouds that soaked up the light to create some beautiful hues that reflected into the buildings. As the sun fell, stray light would find a clear patch through the clouds and then bounce around the glass on the buildings. A beautiful scene to photograph, here are a few from the evening.

Although it is no longer the tallest building along the skyline, the Calgary Tower is still an icon for the city.  This is a different look at the building as dusk quickly advanced.

A view of the whole downtown as the sunlight waned.


Banff Landscapes: Lines into Patterns

In several spots along the Vermilion Lakes in the Banff National Park there are sections of open water despite the sustained cold that has frozen over all three lakes this winter.  These breaks in the ice are due to runoff from underground hot springs that ring the lakes.  The warmer water attracts birds and the occasional mammal in the winter.  On the weekend, I saw an American Dipper and followed it flitting amid the reeds and diving for bits in the water.  Following that, I turned my attention to working with patterns created by the sticks and reeds and their reflections in the water along the shoreline.

Here are two that I liked in particular.  One presenting dominant vertical lines and the other creating horizontal movement across the frame.  I enjoy working on these type of compositions while waiting for the dramatic landscapes to fill with clouds, light or anything else of interest.  Sometimes those come, other times they don’t.  Having a list of different types of images I want to create helps avoid a strikeout when things aren’t cooperating.