Posts tagged “technique

Summer Storm Breaking Up

I was in a great location to watch the storm that had rolled in Friday night and dropped many, many buckets of rain through Saturday afternoon start to break up.

The drama in the clouds west of Calgary was beautiful to watch build and fall away for a few minutes.

Certainly a different feel in black and white.  In the version above I wanted to bring the weathered barn to greater prominence.  I ended up shedding the color and adding a little grain to create a more historical, antique feel.


Hospital Miniatures – Images from Alberta Children’s Hospital

When my son is sleeping, I have made a few photographs of the view out the window as well as the scene inside.  Most images here were made using the Lensbaby Muse lens at F/2.8.  I’m not feeling super inspired in the last few days but it is fun to work with the depth of field focus effects you can create using any of the Lensbaby optics.

Kian loves this wheelchair but I framed it in a somber mood here.


Metallic Moose?

It could be a Canadian rock band but here I am talking about a duotone process for creating black and white images of a moose I photographed yesterday.

Lately I have been experimenting with using the split toning controls to replace my black and white conversion workflow.  The slightly metallic look appeals to me and I like the dimensionality that I can create using this technique.  I have applied this technique to people and landscapes and wanted to try it on a wildlife subject.  This moose looked great among the warm fall colors so it was fun to take that starting point and try to create a different feel to the images.

The specific process I follow starts in Adobe Lightroom’s Develop module but is applicable to Photoshop or any other editing program where you can set the colors.  First I zero out the import settings so that I am starting with the unaltered RAW file and then I build the image following these are the steps to create this look.
Split Tone Color:
I like to set my highlight color to a shade between gold and silver (in LR I adjust the hue and saturation to get the tone I like).  For the shadows, I set the color to some shade between blue and grey.
Tone Curve:
I apply an S curve and then tweak it to find the balance of shadow and highlight that works for me on that image.
Basic Adjustments:
Next, I adjust the Blacks, Fill, Clarity and Exposure to find the final look that I am looking for.
Detail Adjustments:
To finish I, like many, apply any noise reduction and sharpening that I feel adds to the image.  I don’t use either very much but here with the fine detail in the moose’s coat, I found raising the sharpening amount and detail added to my enjoyment of the images.

Usually I have a pretty good idea of what I want the image to look like with this technique but a change to the tone colors or the mix of settings can make a surprising change to the feel of the image.