Posts tagged “moose

A moose on the loose…

This moose was grazing in a marsh west of Bragg Creek when I drove by.  She stared at me for a minute, trotted through brambles a bit and then stared back to me again.

April 24th update: Thank you to The Mysterious Blogger for suggesting the title of this post – now updated.  And, to P.grover for improving my/our understanding of moose and threats to their health.


A family of moose in Kananaskis Country

This was easily one of the sweetest moments I’ve seen when this bull moose nuzzled with his calf.

The bull is likely mating with the cow again this year which brings him into the same area as the calf. I didn’t expect them to have a bond but when this tender moment happened on the weekend, I was obviously wrong.

 

This calf was born in 2016 and still stays close to his mother. The three moose have been hanging around each other again during this year’s rut. I don’t know how long they will stay together as a little family before the bull returns to the solitary life.

When I started watching them, the calf was laying down while the parents grazed separately nearby.  Over the next hour they all moved slowly around the small meadow and the edge of the forest.  It was a relaxed atmosphere which I think is reflected in the photographs.

Eventually the big fellow laid down and was soon napping.  The cow and calf continued grazing.  And I headed home.


Wildlife during a winter blizzard

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The snow started to fly on Friday and has kept falling through the weekend.  And, it’s cold!  I went touring west of Bragg Creek yesterday but saw very little – even when the sun came out for a couple of hours.  Today was a different story and I saw a couple of moose, some white-tailed deer and a small banditry of chickadees.

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Moose love the cold so I hoped to see them in one of their regular haunts.  I found this young bull grazing in the bushes.

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These chickadees, mostly black-capped with a couple of boreals, flitted around a fence line that’s long been fighting to hold back the bushes behind.  I’ve always liked watching these little birds – they move very quickly so it’s a nice challenge to photograph them.

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Alces alces in a Kananaskis snowstorm

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As dawn broke on a recent morning when I was up in Kananaskis, the skies were leaden and threatening to drop some form of precipitation.  It was cold and windy so it seemed an open question whether it would be rain, snow or a frozen mix of the two.  The weather foiled my plans for a sunrise shoot of Mount Kidd but made it an easy decision to drive further up the valley into the Peter Lougheed Provincial Park.  I passed a few White-tailed deer but did not see much else on the way up.  Apparently I had an appointment (unbeknownst to me at the time) with this wonderful family of moose.  They were standing around this marsh in plain view beside the turn off of the Kananaskis Lakes Trail up to the Upper Lake’s parking lot and trailhead.

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The calf stayed close to her mom but was not very shy.  Staring at me several times to satisfy her curiosity about what I was and whether I was something of interest or not.  The bull was hidden within a few trees at first so it was a great surprise when I saw his antlers first come into sight.

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When a snowplow passed by, its scoop loudly grinding against the asphalt, the young one was startled and ran a little ways off from the roadside.  Mom followed and they munched along as they slowly headed into the forest.

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The bull was a magnificent creature.  Healthy and very confident, neither the vehicles nor my presence made any impression on him.  He kept his eyes on any activity around him but was focused on grazing.  I watched him for the next hour as he moved between trees, bogs and little fields.  Their ability to blend in and disappear, despite their size, was observed many times and always surprises me.

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The storm’s intensity ebbed and flowed through the morning and the snow followed accordingly.  At times falling hard, at times almost stopping completely.  Along with adjusting the camera settings to drag the shutter and blur the snow’s motion or freeze the flakes in action, it was a great setting to photograph these moose in.

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The bull kept an eye on the family as they went into the trees and eventually followed them away from the marsh.  The encounter ended shortly thereafter but I would not ask for anything more.  It was a great day in Kananaskis.

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Walking through autumn

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This beautiful moose looked amazing in this autumn meadow.  Snow in Moraine Lake that morning, was rain lower in the valley.  This created a glow in the grass and a shine on her coat.

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She crossed the meadow slowly, grazing as she went along, before she slipped up into the forest.  I continued west along the Bow Valley Parkway and met up with a Grizzly to continue a particularly great day.

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A bold young moose

Moose calf in Bragg Creek - © Christopher Martin-4834

This calf and his mother were in the Bragg Creek Provincial Park, grazing on the edge of the forest near the road.  With momma close by, the calf was bolder than I expected.  He stared at me from a few paces in the trees before crossing the road and walking very close to my car.

Moose calf in Bragg Creek - © Christopher Martin-4751

Moose calf in Bragg Creek - © Christopher Martin-4825

Moose calf in Bragg Creek - © Christopher Martin-4846

Once he had checked me out, then he skipped back again and joined in snacking on the greenery.

Moose calf in Bragg Creek - © Christopher Martin-4786


Fall harvest

Autumn moose - © Christopher Martin-1449-2

A female moose (Alces alces) had a meadow full of leafy trees and bushes all to her self when I found her in West Bragg.  I hope to see a few more in these colorful settings before we roll into the next season.


Mother and calf: Moose in Kananaskis

Mom and calf - 2014 © Christopher Martin
In early April I went into Kananaskis along Highway 66 from Bragg Creek.  I was late getting out of bed and did not leave myself enough time to set up for a sunrise shoot.  I went for a short hike around Elbow Falls but returned to my car pretty quickly.  Heading back, I was scouring the hillsides and trees for wildlife.  I was lucky to catch this female just as she was stepping out of the forest.  The sun hadn’t cleared the mountains across the Elbow River so the moose was not yet in the sunlight.  I decided to set my camera up on my tripod and wait for a few minutes.

Funny face - 2014 © Christopher Martin
When the sun rose over the hill, the light was soft and warm so I was quite happy to sit quietly and watch as she moved around.

A little hidden - 2014 © Christopher Martin
Patience often pays off and it was true on this occasion.  After at least fifteen minutes of watching the moose casually grazing along the slope, I heard a couple of sticks break near where she had come out from the trees before.  A couple of minutes after that, a calf came out onto the hillside.

Forest watcher - 2014 © Christopher Martin
The young moose watched me with a bit of apprehension for a minute, but after a few checks with mom, started grazing and wandering around the scrub brush.

Got stick? - 2014 © Christopher Martin
The pair dined for a while occasionally eating together with mom always watchful as cars passed by or a strange sound came to her ears.  They were calm and it was special to be able to watch them.  I hope the buds, leaves and shoots start to grow soon so their rather austere winter diet is replaced.

Breakfast together - 2014 © Christopher Martin


A Christmas moose… or two

Bull moose grazing - 2013 © Christopher Martin
My parents and I went out for our fairly annual moose run this morning.  The kids give the drive to look for wildlife a pass as they were busy assembling new toys and reading new books.  We found two bull moose in a line of aspen along a ridge and watched them walking for a few minutes.  They dropped down through the deep snow into a meadow of scrubby willows nearby and set about grazing on the slender branches.

Antler free - 2013 © Christopher Martin
One of the moose had shed its antlers while the other still carried a beautiful rack.  Both were big, strong boys and it was great to see them in such good health here in the middle of winter.

Reaching up - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Aside from that, it was nice to share an encounter with these wonderful animals with my parents on Christmas morning.

A little shy - 2013 © Christopher Martin


Moose in Bragg Creek (now snow-free)

Mother Nature flipped a switch a week ago and now we are free of snow and the temperatures are t-shirt appropriate.  The moose probably aren’t excited about the warmer weather but I’m sure they are enjoying snacking on the new greenery.  Looking at the photographs of this young bull moose afterwards, it struck me that it has been about nine months since I have had snow-free backgrounds of moose.

A little shy - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Regarding the moose,  expect that they will start retreating for the cooler forest just after dawn pretty soon.  I think it is finally safe to say we are now coming out of the mild, but very long, winter here.

 


A Christmas Moose

A young bull moose - © Christopher Martin-7922

The cold continues which was great for our family wildlife drive this morning.  The moose we saw were scattered over a few different spots in West Bragg Creek.  This bull looked up with a small amount of interest and then went back to chewing branches.  I’ll take it as a good sign and wanted to share this image of a moose on Christmas Morning along with wishing you and yours a Merry Christmas.  I hope you have time to relax with those you love today and over the next few before many of us get wound up again.


Forest portraits of a Bragg Creek moose

Moose profile - © Christopher Martin-7302

When the mother and calf had retreated into the woods, this moose remained in the meadow and kept grazing.

On the down low - © Christopher Martin-7657-2

When she moved into a stand of brambles, I used larger apertures to minimize the depth of field to separate her head from the branches in the foreground and background.

Winter moose - © Christopher Martin-7580

The shallow plane of focus and a black and white conversion worked well for this image below.

In the brambles - © Christopher Martin-7372


It’s cold and the moose are out

Running around - © Christopher Martin-7167

The moose around Bragg Creek, and elsewhere I would imagine, like the cold.  When the thermometer drops below zero, they seem to come out.  The colder, the better.  This weekend we have stayed below -20°C and I found moose in a few different places around West Bragg Creek.

Breakfast together - © Christopher Martin-7150

I got to spend an hour with a small herd of three cows and one calf.  They were pretty docile, grazing on slender, red branches for much of the morning.  They moved together and apart between stands of these branches and more open meadow.  The young one played a little bit, running between mother and minders a couple of times.

Winter moose - © Christopher Martin-6857

Winter moose calf - © Christopher Martin-7128-2

In the thick of it - © Christopher Martin-7194

What's that? - © Christopher Martin-7215


Moose Travels

These two moose crossed a farm field moving towards the heavier woods of Kananaskis, west of Bragg Creek.  The mother kept up a brisk trot but the calf seemed untroubled by the pace.    She came towards me across the field and then joined a path that crossed a low point in the fence a hundred feet in front of me.  On the road they paused for a second and then hiked up into the forest.


Moose Crossing

(please click on the image for a more detailed version)

A young moose surprised me when I was out looking for owls along the fence posts in West Bragg Creek.  It slipped under some barbed wire which was the commotion that caught my eye and then jumped up onto the road.  Here it was trotting to the other side and disappeared a couple of seconds later.  I saw its mother through the bushes looking back towards the road.  After a few more seconds, the little one drew up alongside and the two walked deeper into the woods.


Wildlife in Bragg Creek this spring

I put together a portfolio of wildlife that I have photographed in Bragg Creek so far this spring and just published it to my Portfolios page.

(Click on the image to go to the slide show directly)

This was for a client’s review of local wildlife images for some prints they are interested in and I thought I would put it up on my website as well.  Reviewing the images from the past couple of months has served as a reminder of what a great season it has been to date.  There are a couple of weeks left in some areas around so I’m excited to see what else let’s me take its photograph.


Sharing spring with the moose

 

The last few mornings I have been driving the backroads in West Bragg Creek looking for moose.  With the days warming up, their winter coats are being shed and I like the parallels between these sleek summer hides being revealed and the rapidly growing buds and leaves.  The energetic growth of spring has my attention firmly in its grasp.  I have had a few really nice encounters where we watched each other for a few minutes and I was able to photograph them in interesting spots.  The moose above took a shortcut between two paths which gave me an opportunity to photograph him surrounded by the branches.

The antlers of the bull above are just starting to push out and you can see the dark coat where the shaggy winter hair has worn away.  I hope I can photograph this moose later in the year when he’s at his most impressive.

This is the same moose as in the first image.  I liked how all his hooves are in the air and he seems to be skipping across the road.  Definitely my imagination taking a flight of fancy but still nice.  I was disappointed to see his ears back as that likely meant I had made him uncomfortable.  It happens but I try hard to avoid that.

 

 


Kananaskis Wildlife: Moose on the edge

After following the deer around for a little while, I walked back to the car and continued driving along the back roads that skirt between West Bragg Creek and Kananaskis.  I went by a thicket beside a pasture thinking I would photograph the horses there for a few minutes.  Instead, I found a moose stripping branches near the road.

She watched me for a minute, then continued moving through the meadow snacking along the way.

She wandered towards the frozen creek and then turned west and leapt over a fence before crossing the road and meandering into the edge of the forest where I lost sight of her.


Bragg Creek Wildlife – Moose Run

Last weekend I was touring around Bragg Creek’s back roads in the morning looking for wildlife.  I did not have any close encounters but had this great moment where I watched this moose dash across the meadow and into the dormant forest.  Moose have a grace of movement that you wouldn’t expect from a huge animal.  With the mild winter so far, the grass hasn’t been blanketed by snow which allowed this bull to keep a fast pace and he was gone in a few seconds up a slope that would have taken me a few minutes.


2011 Favourite Photographs – Wildlife

I’ve been carving out a little time to review my photography over the past year.  It’s been nice to recall some good adventures and revisit some of my favourites from 2011.  I spent a fair bit of time sitting in the snow waiting, driving back roads looking and hiking game trails exploring so it was a great year.  I crossed paths with a few animals and here are my favourite images from those encounters.

This moose and her calf were grazing along Highway 40 west of Highwood Pass in Kananaskis.  She was beautiful and here I was able to make a nice side portrait of her as she watched her young one prancing around.

An early spring hike found me exchanging glances with a large female moose after I heard rustling in this stand of slender branches and saw her a few meters away.

I had some bull moose encounters throughout the year and the hour I walked parallel to this pair in West Bragg Creek near Wild Rose was a highlight.

Where we live we have a lot of opportunity to see white-tailed and mule deer.  I photographed many groups and individuals of both over the last year.  This white-tailed buck was wary of me at first but after passing his sniff test he returned to his wandering.

The mule deer at the edge of the forest was flanked by another, possibly younger deer, deeper in the woods.  They stared at me for a minute before I drove on and they leapt further into the trees.

The Great Gray Owls are present throughout the woods and meadows that I often wander through but they seem to appear only when they want to be seen.  I was able to have some long encounters throughout the year and I continue to be amazed by these magical creatures.

I wanted to photograph more bears this year and I spent a lot of time reading about behaviour, habits and their movements through the year.  It paid off and I was able to enjoy some very good encounters where they were not threatened by my presence and I was able to photograph them safely.

This grizzly encounter was a surprise.  Our group was busy photographing the raw wilderness in the Tonquin Valley on the eastern shore of Amethyst Lake when we noticed this boar walking over the rocks and bushes a couple hundred feet away.  He saw us at the same time and though he didn’t seem threatened, he wasn’t interested in getting any closer either.  He made a quarter turn and walked along the shoreline away from us.

This black bear cub was feasting in a dandelion meadow in the Kootenay National Park in eastern British Columbia.

These mountain goats were taking a break from their mineral foraging to look over the river valley along the Icefields Parkway in the Jasper National Park.

The warm springs along the Vermilion Lakes in the Banff National Park opened a stretch of water where an American Dipper came to reflect and enjoy a nice bath.

The ripples from this American Coot distorted the reflection of the dark telephone pole above a pond in Springbank.

The Sula sula (Red-footed booby) birds in Kilauea on Kaua’i, Hawai’i were great fliers that were a lot of fun to watch at the National Refuge there.

This last one is just a brief glimpse of a humpback whale that Bobbi and I had on a sail we went on in Kaua’i.  I like the abstract aspects of the image overall and it is the source of one of my goals which is to photograph more marine wildlife in the coming year.

I felt sad banishing the runner-up images back to the library without giving them a chance to stretch a bit so I’ve put them into a slideshow here. Have a look at the near misses if you are so inclined.  Thanks for taking a stroll through 2011 with me.

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Kananaskis Wildlife: Two Bull Moose

Hiking west of Bragg Creek last weekend I ended up in a meadow that was a mix of evergreen trees and waist-high wild grasses.  Navigating this open field is much easier in the winter with the frozen ground and there are all manner of animals trails to follow.  It was one of these that led me to this incredible bull moose who was grazing beside a large stand of trees.  I noticed him from a distance and then slowly moved closer under his occasional glance.

I was quite surprised when, as I moved around the trees to get a better view of the whole animal, I saw a second bull.  I often see female moose and calves in groups of 2-10 but I can’t think of a time outside of the rut when I’ve seen two bulls together.

As I watched them, they seemed very comfortable and were not intimidating one another.  I was fascinated and really enjoyed studying them interacting.  I stayed with them for about half an hour and I came away with the impression that they acted like brothers.  One, the first one I saw, had the larger rack and acted like the big brother.  Both were beautiful creatures.  I’m always happy to see healthy bulls as it means good things for the local population in general.

This encounter came about an hour after photographing a mother and baby moose a few miles away so it was a great morning in K-Country.  Much more for me to learn about these beautiful animals.  I love the opportunities I have to do that with them in their natural surroundings.  I rarely forget how lucky I am.

 


Kananaskis Wildlife: Mother and young moose grazing near Bragg Creek

Before the sun rose yesterday, I was driving in West Bragg Creek on one of the dirt roads that skirts Kananaskis.  Looking for wildlife, I noticed a moose in the trees.

I stopped and after a few minutes she walked towards me and into the clearing, then I noticed the calf come out of the forest as well.

There were some branches that she had her eye on and they both stared at me for a minute and then wandered towards the stand for breakfast.  They both appeared to be in good health, the late winter has helped the grazing animals with a little more time to store food.


Kananaskis Moose: Cow and Calf

I was in Kananaskis for the sunrise on Mount Kidd above Wedge Pond on the weekend.  I finished the landscape photography by 7:30 and then headed along Highway 40 up towards the Highwood Pass to enjoy the beautiful drive and keep an eye out for wildlife.  Just after  the summit this cow and her calf were grazing on the edge of the forest.

I pulled over and stayed with them for about half an hour.  One of the beautiful things of Kananaskis is that it has nowhere near the volume of traffic as Alberta’s neighbouring National Parks.  There are rarely bear jams on the road and when you find wildlife, there isn’t the frenzy of crowds agitating the animals.  So, with these two beautiful moose, I was able to share time and enjoy watching them.

Earlier at Wedge Pond, I met a fellow photographer, Chuck Kling, visiting from Montreal with his wife.  We met again at these moose and it was fun to share that moment.  They come to photograph wildlife in Alberta frequently, a good reminder how nice it is to live in these parts.


Spending the morning with moose

On Sunday morning I went into West Bragg to look or wildlife along the backroads and a few trails.  When I got to Wild Rose, there was a moose cow halfway up a driveway.  I didn’t have a good angle but it was nice to watch it eating branches for a few minutes.  While I was waiting to see if she would walk into a better position, another moose walked into another stand of branches that was much closer to me.  About 20 meters away!  She didn’t seem bothered by me so I set about photographing my new friend.

After about half an hour, her curiosity got the best of her as she walked out of the bushes, onto the driveway and walked towards me.  I stepped back towards the rear of my car and she walked around the front.

She snacked on a small group of brambles right beside where I had parked my car for a couple of minutes and then retraced her path back up the driveway.

She stopped at a few branches as she walked up the rise and then laid down on the lawn in the snow. 

I took this last picture before I left her to relax.  I hope spring comes soon so that all of the wildlife get to forage on some greenery.  I think this winter’s early start, cold spells and deep snow have taken a toll on their reserves.