Posts tagged “action

Kingfishing on the water

A family of belted kingfishers (Megaceryle alcyon) live and fish around a small lake west of Bragg Creek in Alberta, Canada.  They are tricky to photograph but a lot of fun to try.  Over a couple of hours there were a few close flybys.  Some I missed completely, they are very fast and can change direction instantly.  But there were a few that got closer to what I have in my head.  I’ll be back soon!


Great gray owl winter flights

Great gray owl's winter flight - © Christopher Martin-6515

I love watching Great gray owls fly – particularly when they launch.  The snowstorm that hit Bragg Creek on Thursday night created a wintry scene that was still hiding spring on Saturday when I went out.  It made for an interesting backdrop to this owl as it took flight.

Great gray owl's winter flight - © Christopher Martin-6516

Great gray owl's winter flight - © Christopher Martin-6517


Canada Goose Flight

Geese takeoff - © Christopher Martin-3200

At Inglewood in November, I spent a few hours along the river watching and photographing the mass of birds that congregate on the rocky islets in the middle of the water each night.  I was down there in the morning to watch them takeoff, heading out for another day foraging on the prairie.  The vast majority of the birds were Canada goose flocks, followed by Mallard ducks and then small numbers of a wide variety of other species.  I really enjoy watching both the Canadas and the Mallards taking flight.  The geese run along the water once they get up above the water, before they are fully airborne.  Here, I used a lower ISO and smaller aperture (200 and f/11, respectively) to get a shutter speed on 1/30th of a second.


Down the alleys with a superhero

Thursday night I was downtown photographing night scenes.  Hunched over my camera, concentrating on some abstract composition my attention was torn away by a blur of motion above me.  Looking up, I saw a flash of red and then… nothing.

I climbed up a fire escape on a lovely old brick building and that’s when I had a good look at the cause of my distraction.  He landed on the flight of stairs above and then leaped over the railing (as seen above).

At this point he was well positioned for an action pose and I managed to take one photo as he was staring at me.  A second later and he was scaling another wall up towards the roof top. Keeping up to him without a jet pack, flying surfboard or some other speedy contraption was unlikely so I just stood and watched as he spun a web and swung out of sight.

I went back down the escape and walked around the corner keeping an eye out for the webbed one.  I turned around intent on heading up the alley and saw him scaling a brick wall.  After clearing the doorway our neighbourhood friend launched upwards into the darkness where I lost him again.

I didn’t see the masked vigilante for a little while and thought he might have gone.  I was heading back to my car when I looked back over my shoulder and caught a sliver of his mask peering around a gate entrance.  I carried on to my car in one of the city’s underground parkades and was still rather surprised when the man spider ran down a line of parked cars and vaulted over my car.  I wish I had captured the whole sequence but I was only able to take one sharp shot.

At that point I was thinking that my chance encounter wasn’t chance.  I know photography was one of this particular superhero’s interests but I can’t say whether he was watching me out of curiosity about just what I was photographing or if he thought I may be a villain up to no good.  I should have asked, not that it was likely he would have responded.  When I pulled out of the garage, I had one last good look at this mysterious fellow.

I wasn’t thinking about it in the moment but, looking at the pictures, I wonder why he wasn’t in full outfit – was he just exercising a little after the day job, the superhero’s equivalent of going out for a stroll?  No idea, these and other questions are still puzzling around in my mind.  The imagination wanders… it was a very interesting evening.


Motion Pictures: Trains, Horses, Buses and Blurs

I love to show movement in my photographs.  One of my favourite techniques to achieve this is to pan with my subject as it moves in front of me.  I like the effect of the blurred elements stretching and wrapping around a train, horse or any number of other things in motion.  The actual shooting is great fun too and I enjoy interacting with the scene to create the image I have in mind.

Standing on a street corner, a forest’s edge or along the fence at a rodeo, I will slow my shutter speed down either by using a smaller aperture or lowering my camera’s ISO setting.  With the camera ready, I then focus on the subject in motion and shoot it as goes.  When the panning of the camera matches the speed of the train, animal or athlete, the subject will remain sharp while the static elements and those moving in another direction or at a different speed will blur.

It is this blurring that frames the subject and creates the sense of speed. I like to play with the shutter speed to adjust how much blur there is and to affect how sharp the subject is.  An abstract quality can be found in some images where the details are soft allowing patterns and colors to step ahead of the subject in importance.

There are numerous techniques to improve the success rate of sharp subject’s in a motion blur image including keeping the camera parallel to the subject’s path, starting to shoot as the vehicle approaches and following through as it passes, locking arms, shoulders, knees and feet and pivoting at the hips and many more.  I try to practice these and incorporate as many as possible when I am panning.

The results can be really interesting and create compelling images.  The web is your friend for specific details on these and many other ways to pan effectively.  It is worth mentioning that while the slower the longer the shutter speed, the harder it is to keep the subject sharp, the payoff can be more interesting blur and consequently a more dynamic image.  I often set my shutter speed as low as 1/10 of a second, which can result in more misses (blurry, unusable pictures) but when everything comes together there is a chance for something magical.

If you have an interest, give it a try and see if you like the photographs you create.  It can be a great way to see a common scene in a new way or to pass a few minutes waiting for the bus.  I would love to see any results you would like to share.