Posts tagged “fishermen

Morning fishermen

Casting into red gold - © Christopher Martin-1026-2Along the coast in Los Cabos, I often came across fishermen casting among the rocks before sunrise.  We would exchange greetings on passing by but they, like me, seemed intent on what they were about and enjoying the quiet the comes with the early morning.

Sunrise and a fisherman - © Christopher Martin-1055

Pre-dawn fishermen - © Christopher Martin-4432

I liked making the occasional photograph with them silhouetted against the colourful sky as they provided an interesting element to these beautiful scenes.

Catching the sun - © Christopher Martin-9276

Shorebreak fishing - © Christopher Martin-9230

 


Inle Lake Fishermen in National Geographic Traveler Magazine

I just received the latest issue of the National Geographic Traveler magazine and was excited to see one of my photographs and a short essay on the back page.

Short story behind the publication: Kathie Gartrell, Managing Editor – Interactive, at Traveler had contacted me in October asking me to send in a caption to accompany an image that I had submitted to the My Shot section of the National Geographic website.  She said that they were considering it as a photo of the week on the Traveler website.  I was very excited and I submitted a brief essay right away.  Then at the end of October, I received an email from Ben Fitch, a Photo Intern at Traveler.  He told me that they had just finished the layout for the January/February issue and they needed a higher resolution of the image.  The photo did run as a photo of the week in November.  And has been printed in the current issue of Traveler.  Not sure how it went from a possible photo of the week to a full page image and text in the magazine but I’m certainly very happy.  Although I haven’t met Kathie or Ben, I would like to thank them for the help they had in publishing this image.

Here is a scan of the page from the magazine with the picture.

Now I’ve set my sights on being sent by National Geographic to photograph a story somewhere in this wonderful, crazy world.


National Geographic – Travel Photo of the Week

One of my photographs of the fishermen of Inle Lake in Myanmar has been selected as the travel photo of the week on the National Geographic website.  Here is the link.

[click for a larger image]

That’s pretty cool – now if I could just angle for an assignment from the yellow border.


Encounters on Inle Lake

I am preparing entries for the Travel Photographer of the Year contest and reworked some of my images from Inle Lake in Myanmar that I made in February.

I have done a couple of posts (here and here and here) on these fishermen before.  I still really enjoy this collection of images from the three days I spent on the lake.

Very good people I met on the water.  I look forward to the next encounters I have on Inle somewhere down the road.


The Fishermen of Inle Lake

I returned from Myanmar with several thousand images to work through.  I was able to spend a fair amount of time editing while on the road but it has still taken a while to start ordering the different subjects into some cohesive groups.  The first one that I have completed is a set of graphic art style images made of the fishermen on Inle Lake.  I have made this into a book and am expecting my proof copy within a couple of days.

First, a little detail about Inle Lake, Inle is located in Shan state in central Myanmar and is at an altitude of 2800 feet.  The lake is about 14 miles long, 7 miles wide and has an average depth of seven feet (up to twelve in the rainy season) and is roughly 50 square miles in area.  It is large, shallow and filled with reeds that sit just under the surface – I never saw the bottom of the lake during our three days spent completely in boats and stilt buildings on the water.  There are about 70,000 people living on and around the lake.  Most live in stilt homes of all shapes, sizes and condition.  The streets to all of the villages, large and small, are predominantly canals.  While I was there, the dry season was in full swing and the water levels were very low which had the largest visible impact on the small villages where there narrow canals were just mud in many places.  Dredging was constant and, beyond a bit of rerouting and a few pushes from friendly villagers, our boats weren’t impeded too much.

The fishermen ply their trade all around the lake and the river mouths.  They all work off small, flat hulled oar powered boats that they stand in back to navigate and then fish off the tip of either end of the boat.  Most fishermen man their boats alone but occasionally I saw two fellows partnering on one skiff.  The boats are mostly made of teak wood and are about 15′ long and maybe 3′ wide.  What draws particular attention, is their method of rowing.  They stand up using one leg to balance on the canoe, wrap the other leg around their long oar and propel their boat using a kicking motion.  When they are intent on moving quickly, they keep one hand on the top of the oar and then drive oar wrapped leg hard which results in them moving pretty fast.  While fishing, they hook the oar with their leg so that they are free to fish using both hands and can still maneuver their craft with a high degree of dexterity.  They fish using a tall, conical net which they drop into the water when they see fish directly below them.  Once in place, they push it down into the ground with one foot, keeping the other foot on the canoe, and then use a spear to skewer the fish through a hole at the top of the net which sits above the waterline.  It is a wonderful display of balance and strength as these men work from early in the pre-dawn, through the day and into dusk.  There are a number of species in the lake that the fishermen catch.  Of these, the Inle Carp is abundant and forms a staple of the lake people’s diet.

I will post a blog of the lake people, detailing the lives lived on Inle in pictures but in this series, I wanted to play with the constantly changing shapes and compositions of these men as they worked the lake.  I focused on the angles and patterns created by the fishermen, the boats and the nets.  To create the graphic effect, I overexposed the shots while I was on the lake, then converted the images into black and white and adjusted the contrast in Adobe’s Lightroom later.  Shooting early in the morning, I worked in low contrast light mostly and was able to eliminate the horizon, the surrounding hills and other distracting background elements in camera via the overexposure approach.  These men were concentrated on the fish but tolerated our presence.  We provided the men photographed with a tip as we shot them for almost a half an hour.  They were not distracted by the cameras and I was pleased to be able to capture their regular movement which I found very appealing.

more to come…