Posts tagged “Two Jack Lake

Flashback Friday – squabbling geese on Two Jack

The ice started to recede on Two Jack Lake in late April this year.  Waterfowl was drawn to the open water as they migrated back to Banff National Park.  Some birds were resting briefly before continuing further north.  For a small gaggle of Canada geese, they seemed to be planning for a longer stay.

At one point, one goose decided to chase another.  The target flew off and was joined by his mate and they landed at another opening.  Perhaps this was a territorial “discussion”.  For me, it yielded a series of images with the aggressor splashing, flying and skimming across the water.  The bird banked around the small cove towards me so I was in a great position to photograph him.




The remaining couple settled down quickly and returned to paddling on the water.  A little while later one laid don near a stand of trees while the other went to the edge of the ice that still covered most of the lake.


Early morning at Two Jack Lake

After a long night of spectacular auroras which I enjoyed from the western shore of Lake Minnewanka (one post here and the other there), I went to nearby Two Jack Lake to catch the sunrise.  The clouds, the sun and the mountains all conspired to present an amazing start to the morning.  The wind was a bit mischievous as it blew softly but steadily over the water breaking up Mount Rundle’s reflection in the image above and Mount Girouard’s in the one below.

At one point a Canada goose entered the water and I liked the way she showed up in this image blurring slightly during the 1.6 second exposure as it paddled by.

The goose carried on to the far side of the lake.  Later a paddle boarder followed the goose’s lead and went out for an early tour around the lake.  She was there with a photographer for a shoot – a pretty great morning for that.  I liked being able to add in a shot of her gliding across the water.

I packed up the tripod as the colour in the sky started to fade out and with the boarder making several passes in front of the scene which kept the water rippled.  I stopped at the overlook above the lake about twenty minutes later and made this last image of the paddle boarder silhouetted against the sunlit mountains reflecting in the water.


Mount Rundle reflected in Two Jack Lake

Mount Rundle in Two Jack Lake - © Christopher Martin-0160

Two Jack Lake’s surface was pretty calm on a beautiful blue sky morning in the Banff National Park two weeks ago.  That meant that Mount Rundle’s reflection was a bit skewed but I liked the look that suggested a fun house mirror.

Mount Rundle reflected in Two Jack Lake - © Christopher Martin-0160-3

I preferred the graphic look of black and white in this image.  For comparison, I included the original color version.


Dawn at Two Jack Lake in the Banff National Park

Two Jack Sunrise in Banff - © Christopher Martin-2600

With the cooler days that have come with November, we have had some snow fall up in the mountains.  I went up to Two Jack Lake for sunrise on Friday to see how things would look with a bit of snow in the picture.  Facing Mount Rundle and her reflection in the water there was just the odd skiff of snow along the shoreline.  The color deepened in the sky for a few minutes before it started to color the clouds clinging to the mountain.

Two Jack Sunrise in Banff - © Christopher Martin-2610

Two Jack Sunrise in Banff - © Christopher Martin-2607-2

When I first arrived, the sun was still a while away from lighting up the clouds.  The darker scene, below, allowed for a longer exposure and more stretch to the clouds and water.

Two Jack Sunrise in Banff - © Christopher Martin-2585

I love this time of year when snow starts to build up and the scenic opportunities shift to one dominated by the white blanket that settles unevenly across the land.  Winter in the Banff National Park is probably my favourite time of the year there.  It is exciting to be on the edge of it.

Two Jack Sunrise in Banff - © Christopher Martin-2648

 

 


Spring Snowstorm over Two Jack Lake

I drove around the Minnewanka Loop in the Banff National Park this morning on the search for wildlife, bears in particular.  The loop starts at the easternmost Banff townsite exit and goes uphill to Lake Minnewanka.  Along the way you can occasionally see wolves, bears, moose, elk, bighorn sheep and deer.  The snow was falling with great enthusiasm by 8 am this morning.  It made finding wildlife a bit more challenging but I loved how the sky looked filled with these huge flakes.

In the image above I was on a bluff looking over Two Jack Lake towards Mount Rundle.  This stand of trees is on a small point that juts out prominently.  With the snow this was the only feature of the lake that could be seen.  The trees looked like they were painted with brush strokes and this image shows some of that.