Posts tagged “prairie

On one side of the fence

On the fence - 2014 © Christopher Martin

 


Eagle along the Cowboy Trail

On to the perch - 2014 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII and 500mm lens: 1/5oooth of a second on f/4 and ISO 1600

A Bald Eagle spent a couple of mornings in and around a field east of Bragg Creek where the prairie starts.

2014 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII and 500mm lens: 1/5oooth of a second on f/4 and ISO 1600

He landed in the grass in one general spot a few times on the two days that I stopped to watch so I suspect there was a carcass that was an easy meal.

Scouring the field - 2014 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII and 500mm lens: 1/25ooth of a second on f/4 and ISO 800

The only distraction came from a pair of ravens that pestered the eagle in the air and on the field.  They proved to not be a significant deterrent as the eagle muscled them out away.

Bird jousting - 2014 © Christopher Martin

 Canon 5DIII and 500mm lens: 1/5oooth of a second on f/4 and ISO 800


The Prairies in Chief Mountain Country

Morning on Chief Mountain - 2014 © Christopher MartinCanon 5DIII and 500mm lens: 1/6400 second at f/4 on ISO 400

We stayed near Cardston in southern Alberta a couple of weeks ago visiting family who have a cabin there.  I went out for a morning on the prairie to see what would catch my eye.  I was looking for wildlife initially but the prairie landscape became the focus.

A farm on the foothills - 2014 © Christopher MartinCanon 5DIII and 24-105mm lens at 32mm: 1/2500 second at f/4 on ISO 1600

Forgotten on the prairie - 2014 © Christopher MartinCanon 5DIII and 500mm lens: 1/2500 second at f/4 on ISO 800

Tractor on the prairies - 2014 © Christopher MartinCanon 5DIII and 500mm lens: 1/1000 second at f/8 on ISO 400

I photographed some farm scenes, abandoned buildings and foothill landscapes.  Chief Mountain stands out from the line of peaks that are the Rocky Mountains where they cross Canada into the United States.  The mountain is close to Cardston on the edge of Waterton National Park and holds dominion over the rolling hills east of the mountains.  I have not photographed this mountain before and I liked working with the contrast of the surrounding farmland.

Barn and Chief - 2014 © Christopher MartinCanon 5DIII and 500mm lens: 1/160 second at f/16 on ISO 400

 


Stormin’ Coyote

Coyote in the storm - 2014 © Christopher MartinCanon 5DIII and 500mm lens: 1/800 second at f/5.6 on ISO 1000

An early spring blizzard spilled across the prairies a couple of weeks ago.  Cold wind and heavy snow were this Coyote’s main companions as it crossed the fields looking for rodents to eat.  Sometimes the Coyotes that I cross paths with are curious and trot close to check me out.  This is more frequent in the hills and up in the mountains.  On the prairies, where they are often considered to be pests, they are usually more wary and run away when anyone shows any interest in them.  This one was kind of in the middle, running across the road away from me and then slowing to a jog and watching me for a few minutes.


Red-tailed Hawks in flight

Above and below - 2014 © Christopher Martin

With Red-tailed Hawks back in our area, I’m still enjoying the novelty of their return.  I went out on the weekend and found a few more who I had the opportunity to photograph in flight.  The snow stole a couple of shots by throwing the auto focus off but it added character that more than made up for those.

Fence launch - 2014 © Christopher Martin-

Field flight - 2014 © Christopher Martin-

Extension - 2014 © Christopher Martin-

Snow flight - 2014 © Christopher Martin

 


Red-tailed Hawks have returned to the prairies

Red-tailed flight - 2014 © Christopher Martin

Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) have the good sense to avoid winter on the prairies and they head south in late fall each year.  It’s always exciting when they start to return and I have been seeing them more and more over the last couple of weeks.  A little while ago, I found this one perched in a great, wild-looking tree along Highway 8, west of Calgary.

Perched but ready to fly - 2014 © Christopher Martin

I could see the hawk was getting ready to fly so I watched from the ditch for a minute until it launched.  There was a second hawk, presumably its mate, in a tight stand of trees so I figured that would be the direction it flew.

Flying through the trees - 2014 © Christopher Martin

It landed beside its partner and when I drove past them I could see a nest buried in the far side of the trees.  Photographs of the nest would not be in their best interest but I hope to see chicks fledge later in the spring.

Perched together - 2014 © Christopher Martin


Prairie storm

So far, spring has come in fits and starts.  Over the weekend we had a day long snowstorm on Saturday and then it was warm enough to wear shorts outside on Sunday!  Crazy stuff but not too far from normal in April on the prairies.

Prairie - 2014 © Christopher Martin

My son and I were out for the day and I photographed these horses when we were in Springbank, west of Calgary.  I appreciated their ignorance of sleet falling and the cold winds.


Snowy Owls on the prairie

Ground flight effect - 2014 © Christopher Martin
I went out several times to photograph Snowy Owls this year but found them to be fewer in number and more elusive.  The ones I did find were less interested in me than the ones I found last year (here, here and here) so there were no long or close encounters.  I love watching them and it was a thrill just to see the ones I did find.  I photographed this one on February 22nd and was the last one I saw this winter.

A wing over the prairie - 2014 © Christopher Martin

We’ll have to see if next year is a good one for Snowies on the prairies east of Calgary.


A pigeon on the prairie

High River Pigeon - 2014 © Christopher MartinCanon 5DIII + 500mm lens: 1/3200 seconds at f/4 on ISO 800

I spent an afternoon on the prairie east of High River, birds are stocking up in the fields as they head north.  Swans, Pintails, Geese and a number of Bald Eagles were active in the sky.  At one grain bin where I saw a Kestrel streaking by, this pigeon proved less elusive.  Curiosity drew it out for a couple of quick looks.  In the direct sunlight I liked the iridescent purple on the throat.

Peeking Pigeon - 2014 © Christopher MartinCanon 5DIII + 500mm lens: 1/1600 seconds at f/4 on ISO 800


Prairie Falcon over… the prairies

Prairie Falcon in golden light - 2014 © Christopher MartinCanon 5DIII + 500mm f/4 lens: 1/6400 of a second at f/6.3 on ISO 800

When I was waiting for my new owl friends to provide a beautiful through-the-window moment, my tripod and I were set up out the open on the snow-covered field that surrounds the barn.  I was not expecting any other wildlife to swing by given my foreign presence but this Prairie Falcon (Falco mexicanus) must have taken pity on me.

Falcon's downstroke -2014 © Christopher MartinCanon 5DIII + 500mm f/4 lens: 1/6400 of a second at f/6.3 on ISO 800

More likely, it was scanning the ground for dinner and the sun’s low altitude in the evening kept it from looking in my direction until it was pretty close.  I was happy to see this hunter though as the light was beautiful and the bird even more so.

Silo flight - 2014 © Christopher MartinCanon 5DIII + 500mm f/4 lens: 1/6400 of a second at f/4 on ISO 200

It was a very pleasant surprise when I ran across another one of these beautiful birds (maybe the same one) when I returned to that same area a couple of days later.  Well we didn’t really run into each other – I was driving and the bird was flying around a grain silo.  It circled around me twice which gave me a moment to get out of my car and track it a bit easier.


Abandoned in the foothills

Massey Ferguson 180 - © Christopher Martin-8359

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 24mm f/1.4 lens: 1/320 of a second at f/1.6 on ISO 50

I love driving along backroads through the farmlands on the prairies and in the foothills of Alberta.  The landscape is beautiful, wildlife (when they allow you to see them) abounds and I often have the roads to myself.  On these tours, I keep an eye out for interesting farm vehicles and buildings.  There are many unusual items designed for a specific agricultural purpose that can be very photogenic.  As purposes move forward alongside changes in technology, some of these barns, tractors and other things fall out of use and weather.  This tractor is a beautiful example of the worn down equipment that dot the landscape.  This old Massey Ferguson seemed to be parked in an idyllic spot to enjoy a hard-earned rest after a long run of service.  That’s a rather romantic notion and I could drive by there next week and find it out turning soil in one of the fields on the far side of the pond.  Whatever the truth, it was a great subject to photograph on a summer day north of Cochrane.


Run Fox Run

Flying fox - 2013 © Christopher Martin

On the weekend I was out early combing the prairies west of Cochrane, Alberta for wildlife.  The clouds were heavy from rain overnight and had only started to thin out at dawn.  I was driving northward along a hillside gravel road when I saw a couple of ravens explode out of a tree on the edge of the ditch just ahead of me.  Watching them fly in haphazard circles it seemed something had stirred them up.  In a break between a few of the trees, I caught a flash of something racing through the field away from the birds.  I was going 40 km/h when I looked at the speedometer and this creature was pulling away from me.  I sped up and realized I was alongside a Red Fox.  It was about a 100 metres from the fence dividing the field and was absolutely flying.

Full tilt - 2013 © Christopher Martin

For the few hundred metres that we traveled in parallel, we were going at 50 km/h.  Its stride was incredible – fast, powerful and efficient.  The back and tail were straight as an arrow and the legs were a blur as it hurtled along.  I have never witnessed an animal move so fast on the ground (I can’t imagine watching a Cheetah!)  My camera was in the passenger seat and my window was already down so I had to try to photograph this sublime athlete in motion.  There were three openings between the trees over the distance we covered together.  The last one had a small rise that the fox disappeared behind and the first one yielded six out of focus shots.  But, the middle gap was a little bigger and I was able to focus and capture three good frames.

Speeding across the prairie - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Before a fourth break in the trees, the fox veered downhill directly west across the green field.  This last image with it close came as I was slowing down and it was turning away.

Fox trot - 2013 © Christopher Martin

I stopped to watch it bound away.  That’s when I noticed that the ravens had been chasing the fox since they flushed out of their tree.  Probably it had come too close to their nest and the birds wanted to make sure it did not come back.  They banked with the fox when it turned and followed along across the field.  About a kilometre down they stopped the chase, circled higher for a minute and then glided back towards their tree.  When the chase ended the fox checked up beside a creek, grabbed a quick drink and then stared in my direction for a minute.

Ravens and a fox - 2013 © Christopher Martin

For its part, I don’t know if the fox grabbed an egg or a chick before being chased off but it seemed to have a contented look on its face to me.  With the remnants of a winter coat still wet from the rain and the rich colour on the face and flanks, I think this fox was a magnificent animal.  It was an amazing encounter that I could not have dared to imagine.

A rest for the fox - 2013 © Christopher Martin


Dawn over the prairies

Dawn down the road - 2013 © Christopher Martin

On the weekend, I found myself on a hill overlooking the farm fields south of Cochrane waiting for the morning to arrive.  I had went out at 4 in the morning looking for the Northern Lights but they eluded me.  This time of the year dawn comes early and by 4:30 there was already a bright line on the horizon to the east.  I enjoyed listening to the birds waking up as I sat beside this gravel road hoping for a nice sunrise.  As the sun prepared to rise, this wonderful cloud caught the early light and met all expectations that I brought to the day.

Sky light - 2013 © Christopher Martin

A few minutes later, the cloud hanging above the farmland took over the show.  The colours and textures were brilliant.  Dawn comes early but I’m rarely disappointed when I do force myself to roll out of bed and get out to enjoy it.

Moonset over the Rocky Mountains - 2013 © Christopher Martin

While the sun and the cloud were performing magic, the moon was full and glowing above the Rocky Mountains.  I’m glad I had a look behind me while I was changing lenses as the view to the west was on equal terms with its eastern counterpart.


Prairie Aurora

Prairie Aurora - 2013 © Christopher Martin

The Northern Lights on the weekend were beautiful.  On Friday morning they were active from 10 pm through to 5 am Saturday morning.  Fiery, green ribbons rippled under the stars with faint echoes of blue and purple streaming skyward.

(for a higher resolution version, please click on any picture)

Northern Lights in the city - 2013 © Christopher Martin

When I received an email from Aurora Watch’s alert service, I was in Calgary finishing dinner with my friend Jack.  We headed up to a hill that overlooks downtown to check the sky.  Even with the orange glow in the atmosphere from the city’s lights, we could see shimmering swaths of green.  That whet the appetite and we headed west along the Trans Canada Highway out of the city and into the rolling hills to the west.  A small marsh south of Cochrane being our destination to take in the lights.

Green contoured - 2013 © Christopher Martin

By the time we were at the pond, it was after midnight and the early wisps of color had intensified in color and solidity.  The thick bands stretched west and east, from one horizon to the other. With the Northern Lights reflected in the water, there were some interesting images available.  I also posted another photograph separately called The Phantom Menace which is a favourite of mine from the night.  You can see that image here.

Aurora abstract - 2013 © Christopher Martin

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A different broadcast - 2013 © Christopher Martin

The aurora was at its most discrete around 2 am with beautiful details etched into the fabric swimming between land and sky.  The Cree named these colourful displays the Dance of the Spirits.  I really like that.  On this evening, the spirits enjoyed a long spell on their dance floor.

A shimmering veil - 2013 © Christopher Martin

With the east starting to brighten ahead of the coming sunrise, we were a bit restless for another viewpoint so we followed the road west for a little while.  This small industrial plant was overlooking the fields and when we stopped to have a look, the aurora was pulsing in what turned out to be the final flurry of the night.

Aurora over flames - 2013 © Christopher Martin


Last Night’s Northern Lights

Phantom Menace - 2013 © Christopher Martin

The Aurora Borealis lit up for a couple of hours last night so Jack and I were out until 5 AM watching the ribbons stripe the night sky.  There were few clouds and it turned out to be a very enjoyable performance.

A few images from the same night can be seen at this post.


Snowy owls on the Prairies

A beautiful day to fly - © Christopher Martin-9219

The past weekend involved a lot of Snowy owls so it was fantastic.  On Friday, I made a solo run east of Calgary and roamed the country roads between Langdon and Strathmore eager to find the white owls which enthrall me.  I found one perched on a fence post warming under bright sunshine along  and had several minutes to enjoy watching her before a tanker truck roared by and the sound spooked her off the roost.

Watching from the fence - 2013 © Christopher Martin

I say her because females Snowies often have dark banding  – often but not always as adolescents of both genders have heavy banding as well.  It used to be thought that males were usually white with little or no banding and the females were as described.  There are convincing arguments for and against however I found this link persuasive.  It has helped me to realize that I would need an expert’s opinion before I would state any Snowy owls gender in absolute terms.  So, please allow me the license to use he and she with these owls so that I can avoid referring to individuals as “it” which seems to drop them into object status rather than that of a living creature.

Snowy owl into the air - 2013 © Christopher Martin

The owl took flight across Highway 901 and flew out over the fields.  I watched it glide low and out of sight behind the rolling hills to the southwest.  I zigzagged along the roads in the same general direction and found her on a telephone pole scanning the landscape.  I pulled alongside slowly, set up my camera through the window and got comfortable.  Fast forward half an hour and she seemed to lock onto something out in the grasses.  When she did launch it was under a cloudy sky which makes for an interesting contrast of white on white (as in the image above).  I love watching the Snowy owls fly and then glide low.  She dove down in the middle of farmland and settled for several minutes on what seemed to be a successful kill.  She was a long ways out so I headed off along the crisscross of back roads.

Full spread - 2013 © Christopher Martin

About a quarter of an hour later I found another owl in a different field.  I pulled off, set up and waited to see if this owl would fly in my direction.  After five minutes it flew parallel to the road I was on and then swooped up to another telephone pole.  This owl was actively hunting and moved around a lot over the next hour.

Field rest - 2013 © Christopher Martin

The highlight was when it perched on a fence post near the road where I was parked and we looked at each other for over a minute before it went over to a higher perch on another pole. The evening was coming in slowly and I left the owl once it had flown up to a very tall transmission line tower where it was glowing in the sun against a dark cloud background.

Touchdown - 2013 © Christopher Martin

As the light failed, I retraced my steps back towards the highway but had a visit with one last owl, this one a male (maybe).  The soft pastels to the east and the glow from the west on the white feathers were beautiful and I photographed him until the darkness overwhelmed my camera’s sensor.

Watching the night fall - 2013 © Christopher Martin

And then, on Sunday, my wife and I took the kids and one of their cousins to Drumheller to visit the Royal Terrell Dinosaur Museum.  This allowed us to search for owls on our drive there and we were not disappointed with the weather or with what we found along the way.  The blue sky was a change from Friday’s mixed weather and always provides a great background for white birds.

To the air - © Christopher Martin-9215

We saw several owls and all but one lingered on their perches for 5-15 minutes before alighting or us moving on.  This allowed the kids the opportunity to watch them and appreciate a magical part of nature.  They had a great time with my son surprising me the first time that we drove away from one bird, saying that we should stay and watch a little longer.  Normally, having grown up with his dad always stopping to photograph wildlife during walks, hikes, rides, drives, etc., he is often anxious to get going again – not this time.  I think the Snowy owls cast the same spell on the children that I have been under for almost two years now.

Stretching into the air - © Christopher Martin-9258


A porcupine in a tree

In the branches - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Driving through farmland south of Cochrane today, I came across a glowing ball in the top branches of a thicket of scrub bush.  The ball was a North American porcupine (Erethizon dorsatum).  The glow was from the sunlight reflecting off of the quills.

A glowing ball of quills - 2013 © Christopher Martin

I knew this was one of the things that porcupines frequently do as they climb up to eat the bark, but it was my first time to see it directly.  I had to cross a field to get remotely close and as I drew near, the spiky fellow dropped down lower into the branches.  Indicating it was uncomfortable with me coming over for a visit.  I waited a hundred feet away for a few minutes to see if it would relax and climb back to a higher spot where I would have a clear line of sight.  It didn’t but I was able to find a couple spots where the face and front claws could be seen amid the brambles.

Porcupine's face in the branches - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Hopefully next time I can approach a little slower or find a more curious porcupine that will let me take a couple of photographs that better portray these interesting creatures.


Winter’s grasp on an old truck

This week’s cold snap came with a lot of moisture and it wrapped the prairie in a thin sheet of white.  This old truck, long parked in this spot and used to advertise a nearby tree farm, did not escape the icy snow either.  Drawing in closer, I really liked the details in the front, particularly the grille.


Taking Flight – Bald Eagle on the Prairie

A cold snap has taken hold of the prairies around Calgary for the past few days.  I saw this eagle picking away at some bones out in a field in Springbank and stopped to photograph it for a few minutes.  After a few minutes, it took to the air to find the next meal.  Given the damp cold, I would suggest it carry on the migration that brought it our way last week and head for somewhere more temperate.  That said, I will be very happy if I have the chance to photograph it a few more times before then.

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Fantastic creatures in sunrise

The winter morning was beautiful earlier this week.  I watched the sky brighten and start to illuminate the sparse clouds scattered along the horizon and further off to the west.  With the color running into the day, I saw a dragon stretch its wings out as it reached towards the rising sun.  Surely a victim of my exuberant imagination, I was little surprised when I saw a phoenix flying low along the eastern horizon when I turned in that direction.  Switching from one fantastic creature to the other during the short time that the best light of the day held, I enjoyed this sunrise tremendously.  A childhood spent reading legends and myths revisited for a few minutes out on the cold prairie.  A warm thank you to my elementary teacher, Alanda, who introduced our class to these stories and kindled the fire of my imagination.

 


Sunrise in the Foothills

Once the horses moved on, I returned to watching the brightening sky.  I didn’t have to wait long for the colour to brush into the clouds.

(please click on any image to open a higher resolution version)

And when the warm sunlight came in, it only stayed for a couple of minutes.  It was great to shoot a few different images while the light was really nice.  The sun cleared the horizon quickly, the light cooled and the day began.

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Approached by horses

The horse that ended up posing for me before padding away led the small herd up the hill towards me.  During one of their pauses on the way up I took the opportunity to frame them as part of the larger scene of dawn on the prairie.  As I said before, I wish I had brought some horse-friendly snacks.


With a horse at sunrise

This morning I hiked up a hill for the sunrise.  As the light started to brush the clouds stacked above the eastern flank of the Kananaskis mountains, a horse came up close to where I was set up.  She nuzzled around for a bit but I didn’t have any carrots with me.  Just after turning back towards her colt, she paused for a few seconds and I framed her against the bright horizon.


Autumn Aurora

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Lights west of Calgary, Alberta

I woke up this morning at 4:30, not for any particular reason I can recall.  I went down for some water and saw there was an Aurora Watch Alert.  The live update showed that there was a lot of Auroral activity so, at my wife’s prompting, I headed out.

Aurora Borealis in Southern Alberta - © Christopher Martin-3029

In Bragg Creek we still get a fair bit of Calgary’s night city glow, so I drove northwest to a dark area of the prairie.  Some clouds cleared out along the horizon as I set up and then the show picked up and kept going strong until dawn.

This was a special time under the stars for me.  I have been visualizing photographing the Northern Lights and planning to get out for a couple of years.  I had a fantastic time watching the streams of light streak across the sky.  It was great to be able to realize what had been a little bit elusive.

So now, with this first Aurora shoot, in the rearview mirror, I’m looking forward to finding some new locations and compositions to photograph (and probably a faster f/2.8 or f/1.4 lens to shorten exposures).

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