Posts tagged “outdoors

Kian’s snowball fight – birthday party mashup

Ready, set, blow - © Christopher Martin-9958

(as always, please click on any image to open a webpage with a higher resolution version) 

The party for my son’s sixth birthday was scheduled for last Sunday but a heavy blizzard blew in the night before and travel on the roads was treacherous.  We postponed the party to save family from driving in the storm which left Kian quite sad for a little bit.  Fortunately his friends who live nearby bundled up, came over and we all headed outside for some tobogganing on the little hill behind our house.  Not much sledding happened as the gang decided a snowball fight was a better use of their energy and time.

The snow fighters - © Christopher Martin-0076

With smile restored and spirits high, Kian had a great time playing and the rest of us followed his lead.  Kezia helped me to return fire after the attack above but then turned her sights my way a few minutes later.

A daughter's attack - © Christopher Martin-0014

Her brother liked Kezia’s idea and joined in the attack too – Traitors!  I was worried about a full mutiny but their attentions soon turned to other targets.

Snow fight - © Christopher Martin-0046

With a small crisis (though rather big to a young boy) averted, we ended up having a great day and Bobbi even arranged to have some cupcakes to finish off the birthday celebrations.  Which Kian enjoyed blowing out a solitary candle on (three times as I had a couple of different images that I wanted to make in mind).


Lake Louise – ice castles and early mornings

The ice castle at Lake Louise - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Lake Louise is a favourite place for my wife and I to visit in the Banff National Park.  This weekend, with my parents taking care of the kids for a night, we went up and stayed on the lake’s eastern shore at the Chateau.  The view across the ice up to the Victoria Glacier and the surrounding peaks was hidden by nightfall by the time we arrived so I was anxious for the morning to come.  As it turned out, I may have slept right through sunrise, if Bobbi hadn’t looked outside just after 7 and woken me up.  The black of night had given way to the dark shades of blue ahead of the dawn.  I looked outside and then raced out of the door a few minutes later.

A window to dawn - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Winter at Lake Louise is magical.  The Fairmont had an ice carving competition earlier this year and the sculptures fanned out between the hotel and the lake.  At night, they are lit up as is the patriotic castle that is in the middle of the skating rink cleared out on the lake ice.

A view through the maple leaf archway - 2013 © Christopher Martin

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Ice climbing with the sun - 2013 © Christopher Martin

An ice castle is made every winter by the Chateau’s chefs from large blocks of ice. Nearby is a hockey rink and the trailhead for ski trails along the northern shoreline. Through the evening and again during the day, as it turned out, these drew many visitors who walked, skated and skied around.  However at the time I went down to the lake, in the early but quickly brightening morning, there were only a few other people around.

Early morning shinny at Lake Louise - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Two people were playing around with hockey sticks and a puck while a couple of other photographers were roaming across the ice.  And there was one gentleman out skating laps around the castle – I was glad he wore a red coat.

Alpen skate - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Once the sunlight hit the peaks, the dark sky disappeared and the cold, clear dawn of a beautiful morning took hold.  It was wonderful to be out on the lake and I had a lot of fun working with the details in the castle and the spectacular landscape surrounding it.

A window to first light on Victoria Glacier - 2013 © Christopher Martin

When the sun was rising out of the forest east of the lake, the warm light on the ice blocks provided another opportunity to play a bit longer before I headed in for breakfast with my dear, and patient, wife.

Framing the sun - 2013 © Christopher Martin

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Lake Louise landscape - 2013 © Christopher Martin


2012 Favourite Wildlife Photographs

Winter Soaring - © Christopher Martin-5201

In 2012, I had some wonderful encounters with wild animals.  Most were in Alberta near my home either on the prairies or in the mountains.  I am constantly reminded how fortunate I am to have an abundance of wildlife living in my literal backyard and in any direction I choose to walk, ride or drive.  Kananaskis Country mesmerized me more this year than ever before and I enjoyed time with coyotes, bears, sheep, moose and hawks there.

Passing through - © Christopher Martin-3946

(please click on any image if you want to open a new page with a higher resolution version)

Hunting in the grass - © Christopher Martin-9706

I started the year with a goal to put significant time and energy into improving my wildlife photography.  My priorities to accomplish this were to improve my approaches to wildlife (to minimize disruption and increase the chance to observe natural behaviour), improve my technique (better sharpness and quicker response to animal movement) and create images that tell a more complete story about the animals (more engaging and interesting).  I moved forward on all fronts though I know where I want to get to and so I will be keeping the same goals to start this new year.

Water off a loon's back - © Christopher Martin-2213

As spring took hold, I wanted to photograph bears.  In previous years, I hadn’t put in the time to learn their habits, locations and behaviours.  I put in time reading books and talking with people who know a lot about Black Bears and Grizzly (Brown) Bears.  There is much (much) more to learn but the effort was rewarded with some good images from the Kootenay National Park and the Banff National Park.  A decent start to the images that I have in mind.

One of 64's cubs - © Christopher Martin-0678

The cubs above and below were Grizzly Bear #64′s and I found them on a couple of occasions along the Vermilion Lakes Road near Banff.  So beautiful and very photogenic.  The park’s wildlife officers did a good job working with visitors and there seemed to be a level of respect and restraint better than I have observed other years.

Cub play - © Christopher Martin-9724

The meadows of dandelions blooming in the spring draw the bears to the roadsides along Highway 93 in the Kootenay National Park and I made a couple of trips there to photograph the black bears.  This bear had picked the flowers clean on the rocky slope.  The wet fur and the posture made for a nice moment to photograph.

Over the shoulder - © Christopher Martin-0782

In the summer, I visited Jasper National Park for a solid week of photography.  The absolute highlight was this black bear cub sprinting up two different tree trunks.  Momma kept grazing while junior seemed to be playing.  It was amazing how fast this young animal climbed and almost more impressive when it slid down twice as fast.

Cub scout - © Christopher Martin-3942

I love photographing birds.  Left unchecked I would fill this collection with way too many avian photographs.  Trying to rein myself in here but it was a good year for birding and bird photography.  Along the way I saw the movie “The Big Year” and that got me thinking… not yet but probably one day.  Here then are a few from the year that stood out for me.

Solitude - © Christopher Martin-7101

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Mallard shakes - © Christopher Martin-8379

Great Gray Owls dominated my local outings to West Bragg Creek in April and May.  I had a connection with one owl in particular (or at least I felt one and hope the owl did on some level too) and spent many days with it flying around me, landing beside me and generally spoiling with opportunities to photograph this most magical of animals.  This was a favourite among many special images of this owl.

Forest flight - © Christopher Martin-1974

The last part of the year I had a great wildlife trip to the Jasper National Park with my friend Jeff Rhude on a workshop with John Marriott.  John is one of Canada’s pre-eminent wildlife photographers and it was really fun to spend a week focused on wildlife photography.  I worked for the images there and the results were pretty satisfying.

A ram's portrait - © Christopher Martin-5702

The rams were assembling ahead of the rut in groups around the park.  We did not have any head butting to photograph but there was time to really work with the opportunities available.  This post was a favourite of mine from the year.

His land - © Christopher Martin-0886

An encounter with a pair of very approachable ravens at a pullout along the Icefields Parkway and family of juvenile bald eagles along the river just outside of Jasper were two other highlights from a very good trip.

Raven profile - © Christopher Martin-6264

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Juvenile in flight - © Christopher Martin-8123

At the end of the year my family went to Kaua’i and the wildlife fortunes were with us.  We had amazing encounters with Hawaiian Monk Seals, Green Sea Turtles and birds of many feathers.

Egret ballet - © Christopher Martin-1079

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Monk Seal peek-a-boo - © Christopher Martin-2821

The encounters continued below the surface and I fear I’m hooked on this fascinating branch of photography now – we’ll see where that takes me in 2013.

Turtle magic © Christopher Martin-4298

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Camouflage school  - © Christopher Martin-081743

The year finished with the discovery of Snowy Owls very close to my home.  There are a pair, and possibly a quartet, of Snowies currently hunting in the Springbank Airport area.  I spent some time with them before the end of the year and have continued regular evening appointments with them in the first few days of this new year.  These owls have not been seen in this area before and my first photographs of  Snowies made in February and March last year required driving a couple of hours east.  The first image in this post was from a range road near Gleichen an hour east of Calgary during one of these longer drives.  It is very special to me that I have been end the year with Snowy owls very close to my home as they have become a favourite animal of mine.

Downstroke - © Christopher Martin-0178


2012 Favourite Landscape Photographs

Storm across Mount Rundle

That went by quick.  Seems like things are speeding up and 2012 went by in a flash.  I reviewed a large set of landscapes from the past year and it was fun to recall those moments.  But, I was a little surprised that a year has gone by since I pulled together a list of my favourites from 2011.  I suppose I have little control over how quickly time rolls – I will just continue to try to stuff as much into it as we go.  Before I move with my camera forward into 2013, here are some images of mine that stood out for me from 2012.

Mount Kidd Reflected

The mountains in the Albertan parts of the Rockies pulled me close many times over the year.  I really enjoyed photographing Mount Kidd from a new location in the fall.  Above, the reflecting pools along Highway 40 just past Wedge Pond were a new place for me.  And I enjoyed a couple of mornings down along the shoreline of Wedge Pond with the image below resulting from one beautiful morning.

Dawn in Kananaskis - © Christopher Martin-9344

I also was pleased with the images I put together from Banff, Lake Louise, Moraine Lake and Jasper as well.  The photograph of Lake Louise’s canoe cabin is subtle and is a vein of imagery that I am continuing to work in.

The cabin on Lake Louise - © Christopher Martin-0530

The view of the Valley of the Ten Peaks from the top of the rock moraine at the near side of Moraine Lake is spectacular – particularly the alpen glow in the morning.  This summer I went up in the evening and was rewarded with a different, and equally beautiful, look at sunset.

Moraine Lake on a quiet summer's evening - © Christopher Martin-4648

This hoar-frost on branches stretching out of a small pool in the marsh west of one of the Vermilion Lakes in Banff provided for a nice abstract composition.

Water - states and symmetry - © Christopher Martin-8341

I spend a fair amount of time photographing wildlife and landscapes on the prairie.  The storms in the summer can be incredible but the clouds this winter have been really inspiring.  In the photograph below I watched a dragon form and stretch towards the east to meet the sun.  Beautiful colours and great to let imagination have the reins.

Pink dragon at sunrise - © Christopher Martin-0697

Before the snow flew, I was working to photograph the warm autumn sunrises on the fields.  When I had these horses approach as the sun cleared the horizon, the image really came together.

An approach of horses and sunshine

The sunrise photography extended west in Bragg Creek and the image below was made along the Cowboy Trail (Highway 22X) just east of the town.

Sunrise along the Cowboy Trail - © Christopher Martin-9327

In the summer I joined Bobbi on a journey to Sedona in Arizona.  It was my first visit and is a place I was excited to return to as soon as I had returned home.  The variety of landscapes in the Coconino National Forest and the time to hike into a few places were great luxuries I enjoyed on the trip.

Sunset at Cathedral Rock - © Christopher Martin-1077

Cathedral Rock is an iconic subject and it deserves its high standing with artists.  Our first day in Sedona we walked along the river to the base of the rock and watched the shadows climb up the red rock.  On a hot afternoon, I escaped to the West Fork Trail which meanders up the Oak Creek Canyon.  The calm water, lush forest and red rock made many bends in the creek picture worthy and this was my favourite from a productive hike.  And there were wonderful butterflies flitting around in one meadow of flowers too.

Forest and canyon reflected in Oak Creek - © Christopher Martin-1474
One of the evenings, I went out to the top of a mesa and photographed the night sky.  It was a bit remote so I had the trees, the stars and a few strange sounds in the desert night all to myself.  That was another side to Sedona that I was very happy to have experienced.

Desert night - © Christopher Martin-1551

There were a few other nightscape photo outings through the year but the highlight was photographing the Northern Lights in October.  I had missed several good Aurora nights through the summer so I was excited when I got to watch them rolling down from the north for almost two hours.

Aurora flame - © Christopher Martin-3034

Later in October I was in Jasper on a wildlife photography trip.  The animals were the focus of the week spent driving and hiking along the Icefields Parkway and around Jasper but this gentle scene where snow had just blanketed the valley along the Athabasca River demanded to be photographed (despite some good-natured heckling from my companions).

Storm above the Athabasca River

And in late November our family headed to Kaua’i the northernmost of the populated Hawaiian islands.  Time dripped by and we had a great vacation.  I had almost too much fun photographing creatures above, on and under the water and those are the images that first came to mind when I was looking back at our visit.  However, once I worked through the catalog over the Christmas break, I realized that the landscape images from this year’s trip to the island were solid additions to my Hawaii portfolio.

Waiting for dawn on Nukoli'i - © Christopher Martin-3851

We stayed a stone’s throw from Nukoli’i Beach on the east shore so the sun rose directly in front of us each morning.  I spent a few mornings down on the beach photographing what the ocean delivered with morning sun.

Red sun over black rocks - © Christopher Martin-4660

The warm light following the sunrise provided beautiful illumination on the beach and through the waves.  One of those places that is easy to spend a whole day shooting, painting or playing at.

Nukoli'i golds - © Christopher Martin-4740

We covered a lot of ground during our time in Kaua’i and one of the favourite places for seals, snorkelling, swimming, waves to watch and coastline views was Ke’e Beach on the northern edge of the Na Pali Coast.  The last night in Kaua’i we spent at Ke’e and at one point there was a rainbow over the beach when I looked to the east and the mists and violent waves of the Na Pali in winter to the southwest.

Na Pali waves - © Christopher Martin-5900

A couple of days earlier, the spray kicked up from the waves hitting the rocks rolled up the forested mountainsides to create another magical scene.

Mists along the Na Pali - © Christopher Martin-2-2

An amazing lightning storm over the Hanalei Valley provided the last image for this collection.  The rain held off for almost three hours before forcing me into my car and back to the apartment.

Lightning over Hanalei - © Christopher Martin-0002


Pele’s Visit to Hanalei

Sparks from Pele's anvil - © Christopher Martin-0002

Pele is one of the Hawaiian deities and is often associated with the volcanic activities on the islands.  She also holds dominion over lightning, wind and fire.  One evening, I watched her play with lightning, throwing it over the ridges that rise up from the Hanalei Valley on Kaua’i’s north shore.  For almost three hours, beginning at dusk, the clouds lit up with strikes that branched across the sky.

Pele's play - © Christopher Martin-9809

I watched the storm from the Hanalei outlook in Princeville.  That put me at almost the same elevation as the strikes which hammered the far side of the valley.  With each flash, the taro field ponds lit up as well.  The deep blue sky early in the evening tempered the color in the sky.  When the valley was totally dark, each flash illuminated the scene in wild shades of purple.  It was incredible to see the changes in the color, the clouds and the storm through the night.

A silent observer to Pele's storm - © Christopher Martin-0038

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Hanalei maelstrom - © Christopher Martin-9821

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Pele's fury - a direct strike - © Christopher Martin-0011

Pele became more ferocious as the night deepened.  Gradual at first, with the wind picking up slowly but steadily and the lightning coming every couple of minutes.  Then increasing quickly along with drops of rain that turned into a downpour after just a few minutes.  I retreated to shelter with the rain drenching me and the lightning tracing arcs directly above me.  It was raw power and I enjoyed watching the goddess at work – by the end there was a determined nature to the storm that made it feel like play had been joined by purpose.

A small window to the stars - © Christopher Martin-9896

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Storm glow - © Christopher Martin-9935


Jasper’s landscapes in winter

The week I spent in the Jasper National Park at the end of October coincided with a heavy snowstorm which gripped the park area for most of the week and gave winter a firm grasp over it.  I was there to photograph wildlife with a small group but stole a few opportunities to capture the landscape freshly trimmed with its winter coat.

During a scout along the Athabasca River looking for tracks, I stopped to work into this scene for a few minutes.  With a bit of time to find something to work with in the foreground, waterproof(ish) boots so I could set up out in the water a bit and a polarizer all helped to realize what I had in mind.  Namely, a subtle winter landscape in this national park.

The last day had some of the heaviest snow in the morning but also afforded the only sunshine of the week.  This image was along the river’s edge east of Jasper a little while before the clouds started to knit back together.


Autumn Aurora

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Lights west of Calgary, Alberta

I woke up this morning at 4:30, not for any particular reason I can recall.  I went down for some water and saw there was an Aurora Watch Alert.  The live update showed that there was a lot of Auroral activity so, at my wife’s prompting, I headed out.

Aurora Borealis in Southern Alberta - © Christopher Martin-3029

In Bragg Creek we still get a fair bit of Calgary’s night city glow, so I drove northwest to a dark area of the prairie.  Some clouds cleared out along the horizon as I set up and then the show picked up and kept going strong until dawn.

This was a special time under the stars for me.  I have been visualizing photographing the Northern Lights and planning to get out for a couple of years.  I had a fantastic time watching the streams of light streak across the sky.  It was great to be able to realize what had been a little bit elusive.

So now, with this first Aurora shoot, in the rearview mirror, I’m looking forward to finding some new locations and compositions to photograph (and probably a faster f/2.8 or f/1.4 lens to shorten exposures).

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Bighorn sheep along the Highwood Pass

(please click on any image to open a higher resolution version)

The Bighorn sheep were in a few small groups scattered on either side of the Highwood Pass at the end of the week.   These were a few of the photographs from when I saw them throughout the day.  At the lower elevations, fall is still in control and I had some warm, colourful backgrounds to work with.

Higher up, around the summit of the pass, the snow that fell earlier in the week was still on the ground and presented an alternate landscape to photograph the sheep in.

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There were a good number of lambs within the larger groups.  I hope they can put on a few more pounds before winter settles in but they looked to be in good health.

For the most part, the sheep were not very interested in me.  The young one below gave me a heavy sidelong glance that made for a good image.

The salts are attracting the sheep, same as always, to the middle of the road.  Most people give them a wide berth.  This sheep was suggestive of the location they often take along the highway.

The rut is starting now so I hope I can see some good horn collisions the next time I’m up there.  The last ram I saw was scrambling up the Rock Glacier and provided a good photographic opportunity in one of the more interesting geographic locations along Highway 40.

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Kananaskis

(click the image to go to a higher resolution version)

Spent most of the day up in Kananaskis hiking, photographing and looking for wildlife.  Such a beautiful and varied country there.  I get focused in on a particular location or species so that I forget about the whole package sometimes.  Yesterday was one of those great times where I felt like I was enjoying, and appreciating, the whole.  If you have a chance to head up to any of the areas that make up K-Country take it, I hope you like it as much as I do.


Mount Kidd – splashes of colour reflected

 

I am drawn back to Mount Kidd in Kananaskis over and over.  In the morning the eastern light accentuates the crags and patterns in the rocks and dominates the skyline from many viewpoints along Highway 40.  From these reflecting pools a bit further south the mountain doesn’t dominate in the same way but I like the balances that can be found between the peaks and the elements along the shoreline.  Later in the morning, I worked the scene with black and white images in mind but with the first light, I was enjoying the splashes of colour.

 

Green algae under one of the ponds provided a green cast to some of the reflections.  I thought the shapes under the water along with the colour were really interesting.

This pond had a floor of stones which was another detail to play with.

With the pink light receding to warm morning sunlight, I liked how the land still in shadow had a cool tone contrasted with the mountain and its reflection.


Kian’s crazy jumps

The kids and I took their cousin up to the park this morning.  The playground there is pretty cool but the most fun we had was when the kids were jumping off some of the bouncy animal rides.  Taking a low angle, I wanted to make these small guys into giants.  Kian loved these photographs and said it would be alright if I shared them.

 

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In the Oak Creek Canyon along the West Fork Trail

 

I went for a hike in late afternoon along the West Fork Trail which starts a few miles north of Sedona.  The trail follows Oak Creek as it runs against the contours of the steep Oak Creek Canyon walls.  These steep walls keep the heat found in Sedona at this time of year at bay and I found it to be a really nice temperature for a walk.  The trail itself is fairly level all the way up to the very last stretch so it was less a hike and more of a walk.  The forest with patches of wildflowers, many types of lush trees, birdsong and chittering insects was very enjoyable.  I spent a couple of hours on the trail, stopping to photograph a small outpost of butterflies, reflections of the scenery in pools formed in the shallows of slabs of red rock and everything else that caught my eye.  I saw this beautiful overhang of rock drawing the eye out to the greenery along the trail on my way up but it was a bit too bright for the image I had in mind.  When I came back that way on my back down, the light had cooperated and I was able to create what I was looking for.


Sunset at Cathedral Rock

(please click on any image to open a higher resolution version)

Bobbi and I are in Sedona, Arizona for a few days this week.  We drove into the town yesterday and went exploring down at the Red Rock Crossing for a couple of hours until nightfall.  I haven’t been here before so Bobbi is in the role of guide and I am the happy follower.

We went to this location which is split by Oak Creek.  The cool waters drew a number of small groups and families offering respite from the 42°C (108°F) heat of the day.  We hiked along the riverside trails and photographed reflections in the water, the towering red rocks that backstop the area as well as a couple of lizards.  A beautiful place to escape the heat.

What makes this place a destination for landscape photographers are the views of Cathedral Rock and the opportunity to work with its reflections in the creek.  At sunset the last sunlight of the day makes the rocks glow.  Last night did not disappoint and I had a wonderful time playing with the elements at hand.


Snowstorm Sheep in the Banff National Park

(Please click on each image if you are interested in higher resolutions)

The weather this weekend was more winter than early summer – In the Banff National Park it was cold.  Large, heavy flakes of wet snow fell fast for a couple of hours in the morning.  I drove up to Lake Minnewanka and this was the only mammal I saw on the drive up and back down.

This young Bighorn sheep was walking alone on the edge of the road away from the water.  When I pulled over, he walked 100 metres towards me and then sauntered nonchalantly right past me.

He stopped a few times on both the approach and as he walked away.  Which gave me some nice photo opportunities to work with the animal, the snow and the even light.


Wildlife in Bragg Creek this spring

I put together a portfolio of wildlife that I have photographed in Bragg Creek so far this spring and just published it to my Portfolios page.

(Click on the image to go to the slide show directly)

This was for a client’s review of local wildlife images for some prints they are interested in and I thought I would put it up on my website as well.  Reviewing the images from the past couple of months has served as a reminder of what a great season it has been to date.  There are a couple of weeks left in some areas around so I’m excited to see what else let’s me take its photograph.


Tundra Swans in the Rockies

Lac des Arcs is a stopover for swans returning to the north.  This year they have just started arriving.

I identified Tundra and Trumpeter swans.  For most of the morning I was watching Tundra swans flying from one open pond in the ice to another.

It was a beautiful day in the Rockies with blue skies and a little fresh snow on the ground.  I went to the western shore in the hopes that I would find some fliers that I could shoot into the sun as well as in shadow – the best of both worlds.

It was fun and I was pretty happy with the images.

I’m looking forward to heading out there again soon.

They are fantastic fliers, very fast and graceful.  Their takeoff takes a few long strides while they get the wings going.


Banff Wildlife – Bull Elk Above Two Jack

I drove along the Lake Minnewanka road last weekend with plans to photograph the sunrise from a bluff above Two Jack Lake that affords a great view of the lake along with Mount Rundle in the background.   Parking at a pullout near my intended spot, I started setting up my gear when I noticed a female elk standing near a tree about 20 metres away.  It was still dark out but I could see her staring at me so we played that game for a few minutes.  It was too dark to shoot and she seemed pretty relaxed so I was happy to just watch her.  Then, I saw some movement behind her and a bull elk stood up and shook the snow off.  She might have been happy to stay there but he wanted to get a bit of separation so they hopped the snow bank onto the road and, after clearing the bank on the far side, climbed the hill to the edge of the forest.  At this point, the light was brightening quickly and by raising the ISO on my camera I was able to take the image above of the bull staring at me from the top of the hill.  I thought they were going to continue into the forest but when I reviewed the picture in the LCD on the camera, I noticed the female’s ears in the lower left corner of the picture and realized she was laying down.

They were in no hurry to disappear so I stayed on the far edge of the road from them and photographed the bull with his amazing antlers.  These are among the best balanced racks that I have seen and one of the largest.  Really impressive and when he licked his chops I had a fleeting image of him using them on me.  That idea didn’t take hold as his body language did not suggest any agitation.  He stayed on this little rise for the time while I was there and the cow got up once but stayed low and mostly out of sight.

I tried not to take it personally when he stuck his tongue out.  It’s a funny look that’s hard not to anthropomorphize a bit.

Even while scratching his leg, the elk kept one eye on me presumably to avoid being surprised by any movements I might make.

Switching lenses for a wider composition you can see the first light colouring the peak of Cascade Mountain above the forest.

I left them just before sunrise as he was turning his attention towards the trees.  I piled my gear back in the car and headed down to the Bow Valley Parkway and, as it turned out, to a pair of wolves.


Ice on the Elbow

After the big snowstorm Monday night, the clouds cleared and towards the evening, the light was beautiful and I was pulled outside.

Before the sun set, I photographed the sunlight on the tree boughs along the path to the Elbow river.  Getting down to the river, the snow was over a foot deep. It was fun to walk along and photograph this river delta just before night fell, looking for interesting relationships in the landscape.

I walked to the far side before I found some breaks in snow and ice where I could see the water.

I used a telephoto lens to close in on the ice formations with a tripod to keep the camera steady over the exposures which stretched up to 10 seconds.

I returned home under moonlight which was very enjoyable as well


Spending the morning with moose

On Sunday morning I went into West Bragg to look or wildlife along the backroads and a few trails.  When I got to Wild Rose, there was a moose cow halfway up a driveway.  I didn’t have a good angle but it was nice to watch it eating branches for a few minutes.  While I was waiting to see if she would walk into a better position, another moose walked into another stand of branches that was much closer to me.  About 20 meters away!  She didn’t seem bothered by me so I set about photographing my new friend.

After about half an hour, her curiosity got the best of her as she walked out of the bushes, onto the driveway and walked towards me.  I stepped back towards the rear of my car and she walked around the front.

She snacked on a small group of brambles right beside where I had parked my car for a couple of minutes and then retraced her path back up the driveway.

She stopped at a few branches as she walked up the rise and then laid down on the lawn in the snow. 

I took this last picture before I left her to relax.  I hope spring comes soon so that all of the wildlife get to forage on some greenery.  I think this winter’s early start, cold spells and deep snow have taken a toll on their reserves.


Walking with moose

The deck off of our bedroom looks over the path that runs the length of Redwood Meadows towards the Elbow River.  A couple of days ago, I was looking out of the windows towards the water and I saw a large bump in a clearing in the trees just across the trail.  I ran out of the house with my 300mm lens to grab my tripod from my car and then walked up the rise.  I thought it was a moose and I was really excited to see a young cow laying down in the snow.  She seemed to be relaxing in the last sunshine of the afternoon.  With the long lens, I was able to stay a good distance from the moose and she was not upset having me nearby.  When their ears lay back and they keep their eyes pinned on you then you need to back away and possibly leave.  I try to keep that from happening so that they stay comfortable and I can spend some time with them.

After a few images, she stopped nuzzling in the snow and got up to nibble on the twigs and branches.  With her slowly walking westwards, I headed further down the path to the trail that leads down to the river.  My thought being that if the moose kept moving west, she would come to this path which would allow for unobstructed photographs with the opening in the forest.

Leaving the moose behind, I lost track of her for a few minutes.  I thought she might have headed through the forest north directly to the river but then I heard some rustling and soon saw her among the trees near the path.  Here she was munching on foliage and watching me.  I had set up in the middle of the path as I wanted her to see me and then choose whether to come closer or remain in the forest.  With moose, I prefer to make sure they know where I am as they can become stressed if you disappear then suddenly appear or create noise nearby (per the shutter on a camera).  She moved parallel to me and then crossed the small clearing and dined on the branches skirting the edge of the path.

Heading down the path, I thought she was going to the river but then she headed east, backtracking into the forest.  At that point, I thought she was gone for the day.  Evening was coming in quickly so I headed on to the river to see what the sunset might look like.  The last one I shot there in December was beautiful so it is always worth checking.  There wasn’t too much color to the west so I headed up one of the dried up channels of the river and was very happy to see my new friend once more.  She had toured through the woods and then headed to this arm of the river to continue grazing.

I didn’t follow her this time as she trekked through the snow, heading up another path to my house.  At the top of the trail, I looked for her and this is the last image I made with her heading north into a stand of trees towards the main part of the river.  Possibly to cross into the undeveloped forest there or to continue her eastward trek between the Elbow and our small community.

Moose are not a rarity around Bragg Creek, but this was the first time that I have seen a moose directly in Redwood Meadows.  A very special encounter with a beautiful animal.


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