Posts tagged “animals

Prairie storm

So far, spring has come in fits and starts.  Over the weekend we had a day long snowstorm on Saturday and then it was warm enough to wear shorts outside on Sunday!  Crazy stuff but not too far from normal in April on the prairies.

Prairie - 2014 © Christopher Martin

My son and I were out for the day and I photographed these horses when we were in Springbank, west of Calgary.  I appreciated their ignorance of sleet falling and the cold winds.


2013 Favourite Wildlife Photographs

The tail-end of lunch - 2013 © Christopher Martin
“The Tail-End of Lunch” from the Khutzeymateen Grizzly Bear Provincial Park
Canon 5DIII + 500mm lens:  1/1250 of a second at f/4 on ISO 1250

Last year was a good year for wildlife.  I had some really great encounters with animals in Brackendale, Cabo San Lucas and the Khutzeymateen on British Columbia’s west coast.  Closer to home, I enjoyed a lot of time on the Prairies and in the mountains photographing .  These hikes and drives were rewarded with nice images of birds, bears and a moose that made it into this collection.

If you are interested in the list of 32 selected photographs, please CLICK THIS LINK to open the gallery’s webpage.  Continue reading below if you want to know a bit more about my goals in 2013 and how they are evolving for the new year.

"Wapiti Water Shake" in the Banff National Park
“Wapiti Water Shake” in the Banff National Park
Canon 5DIII + 500mm f/4 lens: 1/640 of a second at f/4 on ISO 1600

Water launch - 2013 © Christopher Martin
“Black Water Launch” from the Khutzeymateen Inlet on northern British Columbia’s west coast
Canon 5DIII + 500mm lens: 1/1600 of a second at f/4 on ISO 1600

When reviewing my wildlife images from 2012 last January, I said my goals for 2013 would be the same.  At that time, I said my goals were to improve my approaches to wildlife (to minimize disruption and increase the chance to observe natural behaviour), improve my technique (better sharpness and quicker response to animal movement) and create images that tell a more complete story about the animals (more engaging and interesting).  I did work on those throughout the year and I can see improvements in my imagery as a result.

A Bald Eagle's winter flight - 2013 © Christopher Martin
“Winter Flight” along the Squamish River in Brackendale in British Columbia
Canon 5DIII + 300mm f/4 lens: 1/1600 of a second at f/4 on ISO 800

Increasingly I am also trying to bring more artistry into my wildlife compositions.  Overall, I have been happy with the results of that effort.  I’m excited about this new year.  Drawing more creativity and beauty into the photographs I make is the path I will stay on for now.  With our children growing up and more willing to occasionally head out early and stay late, I am really looking forward to enjoying more and more of these encounters with my wife and our son and daughter.  That is the most important goal for me in 2014.

Shadow Pelican - 2013 © Christopher Martin“Shadow Pelican” before dawn in Los Cabos, Mexico
Canon 5DIII + 500mm f/4 lens: 1/8000 of a second at f/4 on ISO 3200


Playing on the beach

The chase is on - 2013 © Christopher Martin

From the deck of the sailboat that was home in the Khutzeymateen we spotted a mother and cub padding through the deep sedge grass during low tide.  With the full moon, the change between high and low tides was over seven metres.  The salmon that have spawned up the creeks, are little more than heartbeats when they float back down to the river mouth.  When the water is high they often get caught in the sedge grass and are easy pickings for the clever bears who are in the know.

Playing around - 2013 © Christopher Martin

The cub played unaware we were watching for several minutes.  When he did notice, he stared us down before trotting back to momma.

On guard - 2013 © Christopher Martin

The mother stayed in the grass until the cub came up and growled and pawed at her.

2013 © Christopher Martin

After a while the cub turned his attention back to his mom.  He trotted over and growled and pawed at her.  He conned her into coming down to the beach and they ran around chasing each other.

2013 © Christopher Martin

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2013 © Christopher Martin

It was a really special finish to a great first day in the Khutzeymateen.  And more great moments were to come in the next two days I spent in the Khutzeymateen.

2013 © Christopher Martin


A grizzly bear grazing and running in Kananaskis

One gorgeous blonde grizzly bear - © Christopher Martin-0061-2

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 500mm lens: 1/2000th of a second at f/4.0 on ISO 1600

Note: For this first image, I removed the wireless transmitter in the bear’s left ear which you will see in the subsequent images.  I don’t normally remove tags and such but this bear was so beautiful I had to share an image where the distracting antenna was erased.

On the weekend I drove along Highway 40 into Kananaskis Country where I had planned to head up to the Highwood Pass to see about the bighorn sheep that herd up there at this time of the year.  That did not happen as #40 is closed past the Peter Lougheed Provincial Park junction due to damage from the flood.  I was turning around at the gate to head down into the provincial park when I noticed a grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) shuffling through the grass just off the road.

Heading downhill - 2013 © Christopher Martin-9975

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 500mm lens: 1/2000th of a second at f/4.0 on ISO 800

This was one of the most beautiful grizzlies that I have ever seen.  A young brown bear that I would guess is three or four years old, with a lovely blonde coat and an energetic bounce in her step.  I believe the bear was a female although I could not confirm gender conclusively.  I was reminded of a pair of blonde cubs I photographed in the fall of 2011 about five miles away from here.  However, I cannot say whether this was one of these two bears as neither were tagged then and I did not find any references online to her tag number.

Bear lick - © Christopher Martin-0082

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 500mm lens: 1/1250th of a second at f/4.0 on ISO 1600

She was busying herself digging up rocks and snacking on what was found underneath.  Amid the tall grass, I did not get a clean look at what she was eating but I assume it was mostly insects.  She appeared to have little interest in the wildflowers surrounding her, as I only saw her stop to lick a few of the blossoms, but I loved having these colours to frame her with!

Run Bear Run - 2013 © Christopher Martin-0115

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 500mm lens: 1/1600th of a second at f/4.0 on ISO 1600

After about 15 minutes watching her from the far side of the road (being able to stay far away but photograph closeup is one of the nice benefits of long lenses), she started moving uphill and I thought she would head off shortly.  As it came to pass, that was hastened along only a few minutes later.  I had been the only person watching the bear at first but within 10 minutes there were a couple of other cars that had stopped too.  I was happy to see everyone stay in their vehicles and give the bear space.  We all watched for a while, then a couple more cars showed up so I pulled away from the gate, crossed the road, drove about 200m past the bear and stopped to have a last look.  Shortly afterwards, a conservation officer pulled up.  I was curious to see how he would approach this situation so I waited for a bit.  He stayed in his truck for a few minutes and then decided that was enough bear watching.  He stepped out with a shotgun in hand and fired a couple of bear banger shells while yelling at the bear to get going.  Startled by the loud noise – it did.

Galloping Grizzly - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 500mm lens: 1/1600th of a second at f/4.0 on ISO 1600

Banff National Park’s officers handle bears a bit different from what I have seen, and in a manner that I prefer, in that they usually do not interfere with bears unless people are being stupid or the bears show an interest in the people watching.  In my opinion, neither was true at that time.  However, this officer probably knows this bear by sight and he is there almost every day so I have to trust that he made the call as he deemed appropriate.  I would have liked to seen him take a little more time to let the bear continue, and potentially finish, grazing but keeping a bear from becoming habituated to humans is a thin tightrope to walk on.  It is easy for those watching to think they could do better.

A little high stepping - 2013 © Christopher Martin-0127

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 500mm lens: 1/1600th of a second at f/4.0 on ISO 1600

Nonetheless, with the first loud noise, the bear sprinted halfway up the hill before slowing down and glancing back at the officer.

Glancing back - 2013 © Christopher Martin-0133

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 500mm lens: 1/1250th of a second at f/4.0 on ISO 1600

With the second shot, she galloped further up and kept on towards the edge of the forest.  I  thought of the running fox that I photographed last month as I watched the bear run – though spurred on by different antagonists, they both can move very fast.  Seeing how much of the meadow it covered when it was sprinting, I was reminded just how quick, deceptively quick, these massive animals can move.   With the bear moving into the woods, I headed onwards.

Back to the woods - 2013 © Christopher Martin-0138

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 500mm lens: 1/1000th of a second at f/4.0 on ISO 1600


#83 – a cow in a field

#83 - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 500mm lens: 1/000 of a second at f/4 on ISO 800

The evening light was soft and warm last night.  I loved the colour in the coats of this small herd in Springbank.  #83 was particularly interested and turned out to be particularly photogenic.


Kootenay Black Bears

Stare down - 2013 © Christopher Martin

We went to Radium on the weekend in search of bears.  The dandelions are in bloom in the roadside fields along Highway 93 in the Kootenay National Park that runs west from the British Columbia – Alberta border.  These flowers represent one of the first key crops that the bears can graze on.

Roadside bear - 2013 © Christopher Martin

The narrow valley that winds down to the Kootenay River is beautiful with dense forest, mountain streams and a couple of small lakes.  The last 15 kilometers of the highway hides the yellow patches around corners and draws bears consistently at this time of the year.  During our visit we came upon a few individual bears munching away.  Most drivers stayed in their vehicles and were generally respectful of the bears.  A few exceptions, but on this trip at least, not the worst behaviour that I’ve seen.

Black bear down - 2013 © Christopher Martin

With the bears not threatened, it was fun to watch them snack away, able to concentrate on eating rather than worrying about people.  This black bear settled right down which I took as an indication that he was relaxed.

Chowing down - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Later on, in another field, I saw him scrunch up his nose at one point.  We left and when we drove by later the bear had also moved on.  I’m not sure if the wrinkled nose was a sign of discomfort with the people and cars or he simply wanted to get back into the woods.

Chewing or growling - 2013 © Christopher Martin

I loved the confidence shown by this bear as it strode across the road to a new field.  I worry about the traffic but the drivers on this day were patient and no one rushed the crossing.  Hope to see more and more of that level of awareness.

Bear Crossing - 2013 © Christopher Martin

 

I would have liked to have seen a momma with a couple of cubs.  Maybe they found secluded dandelion patches to enjoy in private.  The bear below took a minute to stare up the hill under the heavy rain.  I did not hear or see anything that would have warranted an alert stare but the bear obviously did.

A regal animal - 2013 © Christopher Martin

 

It was great to see these bears. I hope to get out there again before the flowers turn to seed and these animals disappear back into the woods.

One look back before returning to the forest - 2013 © Christopher Martin


Owl flights in Bragg Creek

Evening launch - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII camera with Canon 500mm F/4 IS lens: 1/1250 second at f/4 on ISO 2500

Kezia and I drove out to see the owl the other night.  This visit was a real treat.  The Great Gray Owl was very relaxed and flew towards us in two short glides separated with twenty minutes of perching on a fencepost.

A golden flight - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII camera with Canon 500mm F/4 IS lens: 1/1250 second at f/4 on ISO 2500

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Fence launch - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII camera with Canon 500mm F/4 IS lens: 1/640 second at f/4 on ISO 4000

Kezia was delighted watching the owl’s swooping flight and she whispered to the owl urging her to keep flying.  As it got darker the owl got more active so Kezia got to watch it flying every couple of minutes.  It moved into the forest, came back and then crossed the road, perched nearby and then we left for home.

Forest flight - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII camera with Canon 500mm F/4 IS lens: 1/640 second at f/4 on ISO 4000

It was a great evening to be out, especially with Kezia and I having so much fun.

Night watchmen - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII camera with Canon 500mm F/4 IS lens: 1/320 second at f/4 on ISO 5000


Moose in Bragg Creek (now snow-free)

Mother Nature flipped a switch a week ago and now we are free of snow and the temperatures are t-shirt appropriate.  The moose probably aren’t excited about the warmer weather but I’m sure they are enjoying snacking on the new greenery.  Looking at the photographs of this young bull moose afterwards, it struck me that it has been about nine months since I have had snow-free backgrounds of moose.

A little shy - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Regarding the moose,  expect that they will start retreating for the cooler forest just after dawn pretty soon.  I think it is finally safe to say we are now coming out of the mild, but very long, winter here.

 


Great Gray Owl in Water Valley

Owl scout - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Water Valley is a lushly forested area broken up with farm fields, hills and streams.  Any one of these can attract owls so it is little surprise that many are seen in the locales between Cremona and Cochrane.  I drove along Horse Creek Road and the Grand Valley Road a few days ago to enjoy the countryside as well as see what wildlife I might find.  Near Cremona I found a Gray watching the grass in the front yard of a ranch from one of the fence posts.

On maze of old fencing - 2013 © Christopher Martin

By that time it was early evening so I set up my gear on the shoulder of the road and waited to see if the owl might start hunting.  It looked at me languidly a few times and I thought that might be the all there was to this sighting when it flew into the trees.  I was wrong.  It stayed in the woods for a few minutes and then came back to the fence again.

Onto the fields - 2013 © Christopher Martin

A minute later, it flew to a new post about 30′ from where I was sitting.

Flying postal - 2013 © Christopher Martin

From that point the owl started hunting and remained less than 100′ away for the next hour.  It proved to be adept at attacks into the long grass and grabbed five mice over that period.  The strikes onto the field creatures were impossible to photograph as the talons and head of the owl would disappear completely into a screen of pale yellow.

Attack! - 2013 © Christopher Martin

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On prey - 2013 © Christopher Martin

That was only a very minor disappointment, being able to watch this master hunter at work was very enjoyable.

Great Gray Owl flight - 2013 © Christopher Martin

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Flying along the fence line - 2013 © Christopher Martin

I had great opportunities to photograph the owl flying before night took hold.  In the image below it was quite dark so I needed a longer exposure to gather enough light.

Dusk flight - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Just as I decided to pack up and head home, a car came down the road and I snapped this last image with the help of the headlights.

Good night dear owl - 2013 © Christopher Martin


Rough-legged hawks and the advancing spring

 

Rough-legged hawk in spring flight - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Through the winter, Rough-legged Hawks, as with the adult above and the juvenile below, keep watch over the Prairies.  These hawks are equipped for the cold temperatures and many choose to skip the migration and over winter here.  As the weather warms, their cousins, the Red-tailed, Sharp-shinned, Cooper’s and Broad-winged Hawks are starting to return.

Pre-flight perch - 2013 © Christopher Martin

One of the great joys of spring for me is the return of these hawks to the fields and grasslands.  However with a few great encounters with the Rough-legged hawks shown here, I’m not in any particular rush.

Hawk flight - 2013 © Christopher Martin

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Rough-legged perched - 2013 © Christopher Martin

The robins have been coming home for the last couple of weeks and a flight of about thirty Dark-eyed Juncos swarmed our backyard a couple of days ago.  So, spring seems close at hand.  I’m looking forward to more time with all the different hawks that spend their summers raising chicks here.

A quick peek - 2013 © Christopher Martin


Hunting with a Barn owl at dusk

Scouting over Boundary Bay - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Boundary Bay is lovely throughout the year.  Early spring along the levee that runs parallel to the tidal flats, driftwood piles and grassy fields is not an exception.  When we were there last weekend, the rain rolled in as we were watching Snowy owls scattered across the grassland which did contribute to a beautiful scene a couple of hours later.  At the time, it set the owls in their poses as they hunkered down through the showers.

Snowy owl and the heavy rain - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Jack and I waited for the weather to change so that the owls may take to the air.  Dusk was quickly approaching and we had hopes that these raptors would start hunting.  The rain increased and we walked back along the dyke towards the parking lot a couple of kilometers away.  As the car came into view, the rain lessened and when I was at the trailhead, the sun had even hazarded a couple looks under the clouds.  The evening light was beautiful though very soft as it was filtered by the clouds and water vapour in the sky.  A rainbow over the water drew my attention out over the flats and that’s where I first saw a distant bird flying low over the marshes.

After the rain in Boundary Bay 2013 © Christopher Martin

I followed it through the gloom and as it moved closer and into the sunlight, I was able to identify it as a Barn owl (Tyto alba).  This was my first sight of one of these owls in the wild and I fell in love immediately.

First encounter - 2013 © Christopher Martin

They have a chaotic flight pattern where they swoop along and then dive with great conviction downwards at crazy angles when they find a target.  It crisscrossed a large area for about half an hour and all I could have wished for was a bit more light.

Curious Barn owl on a flyby - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Dusk was well entrenched by this time and I was pushing the camera’s ISO and autofocus hard.  The owl was curious too and swooped by on two separate occasions.  The whole time spent watching this bird was a great experience and I’m looking forward to my next encounter with one of these beautiful owls.

In flight - 2013 © Christopher Martin

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Barn owl flight over Boundary Bay - 2013 © Christopher Martin

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Night flight - 2013 © Christopher Martin

I could still make out the silhouette as it flew further away but my attention was pulled in a new direction by a Short-eared owl that circled by for a couple of minutes and then a Snowy which, freed from its perch by the calm weather, landed on a pile of waterlogged wood less than a stone’s throw away.  I hope to share some of those photographs soon.

 


Snowy owls on the Prairies

A beautiful day to fly - © Christopher Martin-9219

The past weekend involved a lot of Snowy owls so it was fantastic.  On Friday, I made a solo run east of Calgary and roamed the country roads between Langdon and Strathmore eager to find the white owls which enthrall me.  I found one perched on a fence post warming under bright sunshine along  and had several minutes to enjoy watching her before a tanker truck roared by and the sound spooked her off the roost.

Watching from the fence - 2013 © Christopher Martin

I say her because females Snowies often have dark banding  – often but not always as adolescents of both genders have heavy banding as well.  It used to be thought that males were usually white with little or no banding and the females were as described.  There are convincing arguments for and against however I found this link persuasive.  It has helped me to realize that I would need an expert’s opinion before I would state any Snowy owls gender in absolute terms.  So, please allow me the license to use he and she with these owls so that I can avoid referring to individuals as “it” which seems to drop them into object status rather than that of a living creature.

Snowy owl into the air - 2013 © Christopher Martin

The owl took flight across Highway 901 and flew out over the fields.  I watched it glide low and out of sight behind the rolling hills to the southwest.  I zigzagged along the roads in the same general direction and found her on a telephone pole scanning the landscape.  I pulled alongside slowly, set up my camera through the window and got comfortable.  Fast forward half an hour and she seemed to lock onto something out in the grasses.  When she did launch it was under a cloudy sky which makes for an interesting contrast of white on white (as in the image above).  I love watching the Snowy owls fly and then glide low.  She dove down in the middle of farmland and settled for several minutes on what seemed to be a successful kill.  She was a long ways out so I headed off along the crisscross of back roads.

Full spread - 2013 © Christopher Martin

About a quarter of an hour later I found another owl in a different field.  I pulled off, set up and waited to see if this owl would fly in my direction.  After five minutes it flew parallel to the road I was on and then swooped up to another telephone pole.  This owl was actively hunting and moved around a lot over the next hour.

Field rest - 2013 © Christopher Martin

The highlight was when it perched on a fence post near the road where I was parked and we looked at each other for over a minute before it went over to a higher perch on another pole. The evening was coming in slowly and I left the owl once it had flown up to a very tall transmission line tower where it was glowing in the sun against a dark cloud background.

Touchdown - 2013 © Christopher Martin

As the light failed, I retraced my steps back towards the highway but had a visit with one last owl, this one a male (maybe).  The soft pastels to the east and the glow from the west on the white feathers were beautiful and I photographed him until the darkness overwhelmed my camera’s sensor.

Watching the night fall - 2013 © Christopher Martin

And then, on Sunday, my wife and I took the kids and one of their cousins to Drumheller to visit the Royal Terrell Dinosaur Museum.  This allowed us to search for owls on our drive there and we were not disappointed with the weather or with what we found along the way.  The blue sky was a change from Friday’s mixed weather and always provides a great background for white birds.

To the air - © Christopher Martin-9215

We saw several owls and all but one lingered on their perches for 5-15 minutes before alighting or us moving on.  This allowed the kids the opportunity to watch them and appreciate a magical part of nature.  They had a great time with my son surprising me the first time that we drove away from one bird, saying that we should stay and watch a little longer.  Normally, having grown up with his dad always stopping to photograph wildlife during walks, hikes, rides, drives, etc., he is often anxious to get going again – not this time.  I think the Snowy owls cast the same spell on the children that I have been under for almost two years now.

Stretching into the air - © Christopher Martin-9258


Eagles along the Grand Valley Road

Soaring - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Our family went for a drive along the Grand Valley Road northwest of Cochrane a few days ago in search of raptors of any description.  This road is nice drive that is rarely busy and can often yield sightings of owls, hawks or eagles.  In a hilly farmland area we noticed a number of ravens circling around a stand of trees in a field a couple of hundred metres off the road.  When we pulled over to see what the focus of their attention was two coyotes bolted out from under a large cedar and sprinted across the open into the thicker forest on the far side of the field.  Looking back to the spot where they started running we could see a carcass that had been mostly picked clean of what, judging by one of the horns that was sticking up, appeared to be a bison.  As it was on farm land it seems likely there were bison being raised here but there were no other farm animals within sight to confirm that theory.  With coyotes, ravens, magpies and probably a number of other predators drawn to this unfortunate beast, its herd was likely as far away from this spot as the fences would allow.  So, we were watching the ravens which were squawking and pestering the smaller birds picking at the  scraps when Bobbi noticed a Golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) approaching from down the valley.

Scouting - 2013 © Christopher Martin

We already had the long lenses out so we were able to photograph the bird as it flew overhead towards the other birds.  Two ravens also saw the eagle inbound and flew up to harass this new attendee.  The three looped around the trees for a minute before the eagle landed in one of the high branches and the black birds returned to ground.

Dogfight - 2013 © Christopher Martin

During this chase, the overcast skies took on a more threatening tone and soon a soft snowfall turned into a blizzard.  I thought the Golden eagle would wait out the height of the storm from the perch so I kept looking around to see if the coyotes, or anything else, came back.

Blizzard flight - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Out of the sheets of snow a Bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) swooped in and took up a spot on a tree near to the Golden.  This had turned out to be a great encounter and when a couple more Bald eagles flew in and around over the next half an hour, it continued to get better and better.  The snow did finally ease up and there were opportunities for nice flight images.

Adult bald eagle in flight - 2013 © Christopher Martin

The lighter skies appeared to spur one of the Bald eagles to say goodbye to a raven it had been sharing a tree with across the field and glide over to the bison skeleton.

Into the air - 2013 © Christopher Martin

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Along the forest's edge - 2013 © Christopher Martin

This eagle brought a good amount of conviction to its scavenging intent and it chased off all of the passerine that had been crowding on the ground.

Scattering the scavengers - 2013 © Christopher Martin

When we moved on, this eagle was alone on the ground having successfully landed and taken ownership of what remained.

On guard - 2013 © Christopher Martin

The Golden eagle had disappeared and two Bald eagles were perched where they could keep an eye on the bones.  The collection of black birds were scattered in singles and small groups around the scene though none strayed close to the eagle holding dominion on the ground.  The last wildlife we saw as we drove away were the coyotes trotting along the hill towards the farm-house keeping their distance while still keeping an eye on the bison.


Eagles on the Prairie

Scouting low over the Prairies - 2013 © Christopher Martin

I’ve spent a lot of time this winter driving the township and range roads which divide the prairie up into a grid work of  crisscrossing dirt roads.  The primary goal has been to photograph Snowy owls during their winter stay here but I’m always happy to see bald eagles when I happen across them.  These were two separate encounters.  Above, the eagle was flying low over the fields west of Calgary and I parked at a driveway in time to photograph the bird flying past.  In the photograph below, the eagle was perched in this tall tree near Gleichen east of Calgary for ten minutes while I watched before it launched and headed out over the fields.

A tree launch - 2013 © Christopher Martin


Dolphins at play in the waves

Exhalation - © Christopher Martin-4239

When I was on a catamaran sailing along the Na Pali Coast we had a close encounter with a small pod of dolphins where they swam alongside for several minutes. I loved watching the deceptive power in their movements. The cat was under full sail and the dolphins seemed to expend little effort to speed past the bow and slip in and out of the waves.

Slipstream - © Christopher Martin-4275

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Nosing under - © Christopher Martin-4273

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Splash - © Christopher Martin-4274

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Dolphin mirage - © Christopher Martin-4277

On the return trip to the harbour, close to the first visit, a couple more dolphins (different I think as they seemed to be gray coloured versus the blue bodies of the first ones – although that could be a change in the light) came by and this time had a couple of humpback whales with them. The dolphins get very excited when the whales return for the winter and the two species are often found playing together and generally hanging out together until the whales head off around the globe again. The whales did not make any spectacular breaches but I felt no disappointment as just seeing them in their waters was magical.

Dolphin pair - © Christopher Martin-4668

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Humpback ridge - © Christopher Martin-4651


2012 Favourite Wildlife Photographs

Winter Soaring - © Christopher Martin-5201

In 2012, I had some wonderful encounters with wild animals.  Most were in Alberta near my home either on the prairies or in the mountains.  I am constantly reminded how fortunate I am to have an abundance of wildlife living in my literal backyard and in any direction I choose to walk, ride or drive.  Kananaskis Country mesmerized me more this year than ever before and I enjoyed time with coyotes, bears, sheep, moose and hawks there.

Passing through - © Christopher Martin-3946

(please click on any image if you want to open a new page with a higher resolution version)

Hunting in the grass - © Christopher Martin-9706

I started the year with a goal to put significant time and energy into improving my wildlife photography.  My priorities to accomplish this were to improve my approaches to wildlife (to minimize disruption and increase the chance to observe natural behaviour), improve my technique (better sharpness and quicker response to animal movement) and create images that tell a more complete story about the animals (more engaging and interesting).  I moved forward on all fronts though I know where I want to get to and so I will be keeping the same goals to start this new year.

Water off a loon's back - © Christopher Martin-2213

As spring took hold, I wanted to photograph bears.  In previous years, I hadn’t put in the time to learn their habits, locations and behaviours.  I put in time reading books and talking with people who know a lot about Black Bears and Grizzly (Brown) Bears.  There is much (much) more to learn but the effort was rewarded with some good images from the Kootenay National Park and the Banff National Park.  A decent start to the images that I have in mind.

One of 64's cubs - © Christopher Martin-0678

The cubs above and below were Grizzly Bear #64’s and I found them on a couple of occasions along the Vermilion Lakes Road near Banff.  So beautiful and very photogenic.  The park’s wildlife officers did a good job working with visitors and there seemed to be a level of respect and restraint better than I have observed other years.

Cub play - © Christopher Martin-9724

The meadows of dandelions blooming in the spring draw the bears to the roadsides along Highway 93 in the Kootenay National Park and I made a couple of trips there to photograph the black bears.  This bear had picked the flowers clean on the rocky slope.  The wet fur and the posture made for a nice moment to photograph.

Over the shoulder - © Christopher Martin-0782

In the summer, I visited Jasper National Park for a solid week of photography.  The absolute highlight was this black bear cub sprinting up two different tree trunks.  Momma kept grazing while junior seemed to be playing.  It was amazing how fast this young animal climbed and almost more impressive when it slid down twice as fast.

Cub scout - © Christopher Martin-3942

I love photographing birds.  Left unchecked I would fill this collection with way too many avian photographs.  Trying to rein myself in here but it was a good year for birding and bird photography.  Along the way I saw the movie “The Big Year” and that got me thinking… not yet but probably one day.  Here then are a few from the year that stood out for me.

Solitude - © Christopher Martin-7101

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Mallard shakes - © Christopher Martin-8379

Great Gray Owls dominated my local outings to West Bragg Creek in April and May.  I had a connection with one owl in particular (or at least I felt one and hope the owl did on some level too) and spent many days with it flying around me, landing beside me and generally spoiling with opportunities to photograph this most magical of animals.  This was a favourite among many special images of this owl.

Forest flight - © Christopher Martin-1974

The last part of the year I had a great wildlife trip to the Jasper National Park with my friend Jeff Rhude on a workshop with John Marriott.  John is one of Canada’s pre-eminent wildlife photographers and it was really fun to spend a week focused on wildlife photography.  I worked for the images there and the results were pretty satisfying.

A ram's portrait - © Christopher Martin-5702

The rams were assembling ahead of the rut in groups around the park.  We did not have any head butting to photograph but there was time to really work with the opportunities available.  This post was a favourite of mine from the year.

His land - © Christopher Martin-0886

An encounter with a pair of very approachable ravens at a pullout along the Icefields Parkway and family of juvenile bald eagles along the river just outside of Jasper were two other highlights from a very good trip.

Raven profile - © Christopher Martin-6264

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Juvenile in flight - © Christopher Martin-8123

At the end of the year my family went to Kaua’i and the wildlife fortunes were with us.  We had amazing encounters with Hawaiian Monk Seals, Green Sea Turtles and birds of many feathers.

Egret ballet - © Christopher Martin-1079

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Monk Seal peek-a-boo - © Christopher Martin-2821

The encounters continued below the surface and I fear I’m hooked on this fascinating branch of photography now – we’ll see where that takes me in 2013.

Turtle magic © Christopher Martin-4298

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Camouflage school  - © Christopher Martin-081743

The year finished with the discovery of Snowy Owls very close to my home.  There are a pair, and possibly a quartet, of Snowies currently hunting in the Springbank Airport area.  I spent some time with them before the end of the year and have continued regular evening appointments with them in the first few days of this new year.  These owls have not been seen in this area before and my first photographs of  Snowies made in February and March last year required driving a couple of hours east.  The first image in this post was from a range road near Gleichen an hour east of Calgary during one of these longer drives.  It is very special to me that I have been end the year with Snowy owls very close to my home as they have become a favourite animal of mine.

Downstroke - © Christopher Martin-0178


Dolphin Spray

Dolphin spray - © Christopher Martin-4273-2

A dolphin slices through the waves of the Northern Swell off Kaua’i, Hawai’i.  I was on a catamaran and the dolphin had no trouble keeping up


Canada Goose Flight

Geese takeoff - © Christopher Martin-3200

At Inglewood in November, I spent a few hours along the river watching and photographing the mass of birds that congregate on the rocky islets in the middle of the water each night.  I was down there in the morning to watch them takeoff, heading out for another day foraging on the prairie.  The vast majority of the birds were Canada goose flocks, followed by Mallard ducks and then small numbers of a wide variety of other species.  I really enjoy watching both the Canadas and the Mallards taking flight.  The geese run along the water once they get up above the water, before they are fully airborne.  Here, I used a lower ISO and smaller aperture (200 and f/11, respectively) to get a shutter speed on 1/30th of a second.


The wonder of ravens

When the light is really soft and even, the patterns and subtle colours in their feathers, the scratches that tell stories in their beaks and their intelligent eyes provide great material to work with.  These images are from a little shoot with a curious couple who spend their time at one viewpoint pullout along the Icefields Parkway in the Jasper National Park.  On this day, the clouds were hanging low in the valley and heavily diffused the sunlight so that even the darkest shadows were only a muted grey.  Perfect conditions to photograph these birds around their hangout.  I posted one portrait of these birds a couple of days ago and with a little more time now, I enjoyed putting together a few more images for this entry.

The snow fell intermittently and provided another element to work with.  What had already fallen to the ground over the past week created clean backgrounds and when coupled with wide apertures allowed the ravens to stand out with a nice dimensionality.

The camera I photographed with here, the Canon 5D Mark III has a slight bluish colour cast at higher ISO settings.  These are easily removed in any photo editing software but I really liked the iridescent quality in the image above.

Drawing closer in, the lines drawn by the feathers around the face and neck create really great patterns that go unseen when ravens are usually seen given the dark colours.


Got salt?

Bighorn sheep licking for salt near Jasper, Alberta, Canada

The ram resting in the deep snow while still early morning had distracted us away from the herd.  While photographing the massive leader, his flock had sidled up to the vehicles and were licking the vehicles in hopes of finding salt.  The roads in the park are only sanded as far as I know but there may have been salt still on some the cars that were from further afield.  Either way even the ram eventually rose and joined in.  He can be seen under the neck of sheep licking the back tire.  The body position of the sheep on the left defines this image and provided the name for the photograph and this post.


A wet coyote in the Spray Lakes valley

This coyote was scouting along the banks of the small river which winds back on itself several times as it crosses the meadow beside the road up to Shark Mountain in the Spray Valley Provincial Park.  It was almost cold enough for snow and the coyote’s coat was slick from the freezing rain.  The resulting glow made this healthy canine stand out beautifully against the long grasses.

After watching us for a couple of minutes, the coyote continued along the edge of the river.  Eventually it crossed over the meadow and climbed up the hill.

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Approached by horses

The horse that ended up posing for me before padding away led the small herd up the hill towards me.  During one of their pauses on the way up I took the opportunity to frame them as part of the larger scene of dawn on the prairie.  As I said before, I wish I had brought some horse-friendly snacks.


Elk in the forest in the Banff National Park

The trees in the forest were soaked and the rain was still falling as the morning brightened.  We found a large herd of elk in the woods in the Lake Minnewanka area of the Banff National Park.  There were seven or eight cows and two calves grazing, grooming and walking in the shadows.

And one beautiful bull.

He was back in the forest for quite a while and only came up to the edge of trees for a few minutes before moving slowly back again.  Nearby, one of the calves settled down on a patch of grass in a clearing.  It seemed to have only a passing interest in its observers.

The rest of the family was grazing through the forest.  The two below were content to share a clump of colourful leaves for lunch.

The bull came back for another lap along the frontline and we left soon after.


Wapiti around Minnewanka

 

 

 

 

A bull elk smells the air, alert for danger, in the Banff National Park

I went up to Banff National Park with my friend and fellow photographer Jeff Rhude on the weekend.  The clouds were hanging low all the way from Bragg Creek, through Canmore and into the park so we were unsure what opportunities we would find in the mountains on the day.  As the sky brightened a little we could find no breaks in the clouds so we left the sunrise plans on the shelf for another day.  Focusing our attention on wildlife, we headed up to the ring road which leads up to Lake Minnewanka.  With bears trying to fatten up for hibernation, sheep starting into the rut and moose and elk following suit, we hoped there may be a few animals out in the rain.

Elk bull stares at the photographer

It was the wapiti, the word for elk in the Cree language, that seemed least put off by the weather and we found a small group of calves and cows led by one majestic bull on the meadow approaching the turnoff to Johnson Lake.

A bull elk sticks his tongue out in a meadow in the Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada

 

 

It was still very dark so high ISOs and long shutter speeds were required which resulted in a few blurs when an ear twitched or one of the creatures stepped forward.  Still, the family were cooperative and with the benefit of long lenses I was able to stay a good distance away while making some nice images.

Two elk, a mother cow and a calf, stand gazing in a meadow in the Banff National Park

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Driving on towards the lake, we did not see any other animals.  At Minnewanka aside from a couple of mergansers on the water there were two large flotillas of black birds, each probably with over a hundred members, but they were too far out for me to identify.  We turned around and retraced our steps.  Passing the meadow, we could see the bull on the edge of the trees alongside one calf.  A couple of miles down the road, we caught sight of one elk in the trees.  Stopping and looking more intently, we soon saw about ten more cows and calves moving through the shadows and the gloom.  I will put together a post with a few of those images soon.

An image of a bull elk in the Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada


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