Wildlife

Autumn animals… before the season is too long gone

Autumn animals - © Christopher Martin-3346

In between the absurdly early snowstorm in September and the first winter cold snap that started last week, we had a great autumn here in the Foothills between Calgary and Banff.  I spent a fair bit of time on the prairies and enjoyed some good encounters with their wild residents.  The Great Horned Owl above was from a stand of trees west of High River during a great day where I had two separate encounters (one and two) with these beautiful owls.  The one below is closer to home being a few miles south of Cochrane.

Autumn animals - © Christopher Martin-4927

A beaver in the lake at Wild Rose, west of Bragg Creek, let me watch him swim on an overcast day where the ripples were soft and provided some nice opportunities.  On another visit a pair of muskrat preened on the lake’s shoreline before returning to the water.

Autumn animals - © Christopher Martin-7120

Autumn animals - © Christopher Martin-7113

Autumn animals - © Christopher Martin-6745

White-tailed deer are regularly seen in the fields as they stock up for winter.  It was cool to see the young stag in the second image that was stag traversing the blackened earth in a much less recovered section of the Sawback prescribed burn that was done in 1993.

Autumn animals - © Christopher Martin-5786

Autumn animals - © Christopher Martin-8338

Another White-tail on the prairies stood on alert in a field south of Cochrane where I watched two stags rutting.

Autumn animals - © Christopher Martin-9399


House Sparrows in Canmore

Canmore House Sparrows - © Christopher Martin-8941

The Summit Cafe is a favourite place for Bobbi and I to have breakfast when we are in Canmore.  I was there last weekend, sitting on their patio outside.  The sun was out, the snow had melted and it had more of a spring feel than anything else.  These House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) contributed to that with their chittering and occasional outburst of song.  There were about 15 that darted between the roof of a nearby building, a deck railing and a shrubbery that was more stick than bush given the time of year.

Canmore House Sparrows - © Christopher Martin-8981

Canmore House Sparrows - © Christopher Martin-8970

Canmore House Sparrows - © Christopher Martin-8984

Canmore House Sparrows - © Christopher Martin-9034

Canmore House Sparrows - © Christopher Martin-9010


Wildlife Gallery: A whole bunch of Grizzly bears

It is no surprise that I am quite fond of bears.  Grizzly bears are of particular interest to me so it was a lot of fun putting together a gallery of my favourite Grizzly images from the past couple of years for a project that I am working on with a client.

Khutzeymateen Inlet, British Columbia, Canada - August 2013

If you are interested in seeing the images in this rather large set, please click the image or this link.


Fighting in the fields

Rutting bucks - © Christopher Martin-5183

I was roaming the gravel roads east of south of Cochrane on the weekend.  As dusk started to fall, I found a small herd of white-tailed deer in the middle of a field.  There were two bucks standing apart from four does.  The smaller male was prancing about a bit so I put on my longest lens and waited to see if anything would happen.  We are still in the middle of the rut so I was hoping they might do some antler jousting.

Rutting bucks - © Christopher Martin-5176-2

And, as it turned out, they did.  They clashed a couple of times with antlers cracking while they tangled head to head.  The battle was short, frenetic and I felt very lucky to watch this moment play out.

Rutting bucks - © Christopher Martin-5175

Rutting bucks - © Christopher Martin-5184

After this skirmish the smaller one darted away and they stood apart for a minute before moving up a fold in the hillside back towards the seemingly unimpressed does.

Rutting bucks - © Christopher Martin-5202


Red-tailed flights in Turner Valley

Turner Valley Hawks - © Christopher Martin-3798

On my return from the two separate visits with Great Horned Owls near High River, I drove past Okotoks, through Black Diamond and Turner Valley and then back to Bragg Creek.  I counted more than twenty five hawks before I reached Priddis.  Along the way, I stopped a couple of times that were in interesting locations.

Turner Valley Hawks - © Christopher Martin-3755

 

Turner Valley Hawks - © Christopher Martin-3733

One Red-tailed hawk was hunting from a wooden gate and fence dividing a farm from the highway.  This hawk dove once while I was set up – it was great to observe an attack from close range thanks to a long telephoto lens.  It returned to the post empty-taloned but then launched out over the field and grabbed a mouse when it neared the far side.  Too far for a decent photograph but great to watch.

Turner Valley Hawks - © Christopher Martin-3786

Turner Valley Hawks - © Christopher Martin-3787

Turner Valley Hawks - © Christopher Martin-3797

Turner Valley Hawks - © Christopher Martin-3799

Turner Valley Hawks - © Christopher Martin-3801


An owl in the woods

Owl in the woods - © Christopher Martin-3303-2

A Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) brought in the day with me last week.  A short while after leaving there, I visited a stand of trees that line a gravel road south of Frank Lake.  There is a nest for a pair of these owls which has been used for decades.  I photographed the nest last spring and wanted to drive by to have a look.  The chicks would have fledged in June and the nest was empty of any residents.

Owl in the woods - © Christopher Martin-3341

Owl in the woods - © Christopher Martin-3308

I found this tiger owl a couple of hundred metres away perched about 3 metres off the ground.  It was quite alert considering its nocturnal nature and moved to three separate locations in grove over the half an hour that I watched the bird.

 

Owl in the woods - © Christopher Martin-3126

Owl in the woods - © Christopher Martin-3336

Owl in the woods - © Christopher Martin-3286


Fall harvest

Autumn moose - © Christopher Martin-1449-2

A female moose (Alces alces) had a meadow full of leafy trees and bushes all to her self when I found her in West Bragg.  I hope to see a few more in these colorful settings before we roll into the next season.


A Tiger Owl on the Prairies

 

Autumn Tiger Owl - © Christopher Martin-2733

I drove to the High River area on the weekend to look for owls.  It was still dark when I found a Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) perched to the side of a small pond east of Frank Lake.

Autumn Tiger Owl - © Christopher Martin-2438

I set up on the side of the road and spent almost two hours watching him from across the water.  The morning slowly got brighter but with heavy gray clouds diffusing the sunlight, it stayed dark for most of the first hour.  The owl alternated between short naps and moments of intent staring at any stray sound or motion.  These last were both mostly imperceptible to me but kept my attention, and the long lens, focused on him.

Autumn Great Horned Owl flight - © Christopher Martin-2735

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Owl over water - © Christopher Martin-2738

Just before 9 am, he stretched wings vertically and launched into the air.  After a couple of quick strokes, he glided over the pond and landed in a bare limbed tree.

Autumn Tiger Owl - © Christopher Martin-2809

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Autumn Tiger Owl - © Christopher Martin-2751

The skeletal branches did not suit for long and he crossed to another tree edging the pond.  This tree was heavy with autumn tinged leaves and provided a third distinct setting for me to photograph this beautiful tiger owl in.

Autumn Tiger Owl - © Christopher Martin-2969

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Autumn Tiger Owl - © Christopher Martin-2859

After a few more minutes, he walked down the branch and settled closer to the trunk and more out of sight.  I packed up and while I was putting my tripod away, I watched him fly out and glide over the field behind the pond.

Autumn Tiger Owl - © Christopher Martin-2834


Grazing in the estuary

 

2014 © Christopher Martin

When I was in the Khutzeymateen (K’tzim-a-deen) in June, the sedge was waist-high in the estuary which sits at the end of park’s fjord.  The Grizzly bears come out of hibernation in late May or early June and the grass is growing fast and waiting for them.  We spent an hour watching this boar mowing a path through the green.  He was a big, beautiful bear and it was a privilege to spend some time watching him in his valley.

2014 © Christopher Martin

(Click any image to open a higher resolution version in its own webpage)

Grizzly and grass - 2014 © Christopher Martin

We took the zodiac from the sailboat in the morning and were lucky that the weather didn’t beat us up.  The rain varied between a drizzle and a downpour which provided great mood to some of the images.   Being in the Great Bear Rainforest on the west coast, it can rain hard and often does.  There is a point where it is impossible to photograph, or even stay outside, but that day it went easy on us and played nicely.  Along the way we saw several bears at different points in the estuary and only headed out when the tide started to come in.

Khutzeymateen Grizzly - 2014 © Christopher Martin

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Looking up - 2014 © Christopher Martin

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Grizzly and grass - 2014 © Christopher Martin -

Sitting down for dinner - 2014 © Christopher Martin


Kananaskis Grizzly Bear 151

Kananaskis Grizzly 151 - © Christopher Martin-1060

Last weekend I was in Kananaskis and was very fortunate to watch a Grizzly bear digging up roots, swimming in the Kananaskis River and walking above and along the shoreline.  After a beautiful, mist-filled morning at Wedge Pond I pulled out my longer lenses and drove along Highway 40 intent upon driving over the Highwood Pass.  There is a spot a few kilometres south of Mount Kidd where a bend in the river draws close to the road and affords a clear view of both sides of the shoreline.

Kananaskis Grizzly 151 - © Christopher Martin-0256

I saw the bear walking into the forest above the water as I came up to the river bend.  She came back into sight a couple hundred metres further down in a small clearing.  For a half an hour she shuffled between a couple of similar breaks in the forest above the water.  I thought she was going to continue around the corner and out of sight but instead she walked into the water and swam across to the other shore.  She pulled out of the water and set about digging back in the trees for most of an hour.

Kananaskis Grizzly 151 - © Christopher Martin-1025

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Kananaskis Grizzly 151 - © Christopher Martin-0501

She came into clear view on the bank twice which allowed for some nice opportunities.  The rest of the time I enjoyed watching her  as she went about her business.  During this time, one of the park rangers stopped by and monitored the bear for a while.  He kindly shared information about this beautiful animal.  She is Bear Number 151 and is one of three cubs that left their mother this spring.  The mother is native to Kananaskis and raised the triplets in the area for their first three years covering an impressive amount of territory during that time.

Kananaskis Grizzly 151 - © Christopher Martin-0941

151 looked very healthy and the ranger confirmed that these bears were doing well and had not developed any habits which could bring them into conflict with people.  I was very glad to hear that.  He carried on with his duties which called him to other parts of Kananaskis and I continued watching her.  Several times, when a few minutes had passed with no sign of her, I thought she had melted into the forest and ended this special encounter.  At one point I didn’t see her for 15 minutes and had begun packing up my gear.  I looked back towards the river just as she stepped out of the thick bushes and onto a sandy strip on the far side of the river.

 Kananaskis Grizzly 151 - © Christopher Martin-1054-

Kananaskis Grizzly 151 - © Christopher Martin-4719

She sniffed at the air, angled to her left and crossed the sand.  At the water, she crossed a shallow part and then swam over to a dead tree likely uprooted in the 2013 flood.

Kananaskis Grizzly 151 - © Christopher Martin-1075

It was a first for me to watch a bear climb this kind of tree, with all of the spiny branches, in this river shore landscape.

Kananaskis Grizzly 151 - © Christopher Martin-1137

I really had fun photographing her moving through her land.  When she got onto the bank, returning to the clearing where I had first photographed her, she made a quick dig for roots and then walked into the woods towards the road.  I jogged up to the road and after a few minutes she came out a few hundred metres north, quickly crossed the road and headed into the forest that anchors the western slope of The Wedge.

Kananaskis Grizzly 151 - © Christopher Martin-1150

 

 

 


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