Kananaskis

A blizzard at Elbow Falls

Elbow Falls - 2014 © Christopher MartinCanon 5DIII + 24-105mm lens at 65mm: 2.5 seconds at f/16 on ISO 200

I went back to Elbow Falls for the third time in the last couple of weeks.  With the snowstorm that blew in on the weekend, I was drawn back to see another face to the area.  Heavy snowflakes had piled up in the trees and across the rocks with more falling rapidly when I was up there.  A slip on the ice was my payment for passage but I liked the scene I slid into.  The falling snow gave the trees a charcoal sketched look while the rocks and water in the river had texture and character that seemed to suit black and white processing.


Raven flight

Raven flight - 2014 © Christopher MartinCanon 5DIII + 70-200mm lens at 200mm: 1/6400th of a second at f/4 on ISO 1600

I went out for a long walk in Kananaskis this morning.  Along an old road I hadn’t traveled on before, I was kept company by the heavy snow falling and a lone raven that croaked as I was returning to the trailhead.  I stopped for a few minutes and heard another raven further down the valley that was talking with “my” raven.  This one flew off in that direction and I carried on.


Elbow Falls in winter’s clothing again

Elbow Falls in winter's clothing - 2014 © Christopher MartinCanon 5DIII + 17-40mm lens at 17mm: 1/3rd of a second at f/16 on ISO 200

With fresh snow on the ground, I went back up to Elbow Falls to see how the valley would look in a return to winter clothing.  I was there only a week ago and the change, beyond the cold, was significant.  I love snow-covered landscapes so I found this visit to Kananaskis to be a very beautiful one.  I think spring is coming soon but when winter is this pretty, I don’t mind a little delay.

Early morning blues - 2014 © Christopher MartinThe blues before dawn…
Canon 5DIII + 17-40mm lens at 26mm: 3.2 seconds at f/11 on ISO 200
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2014 © Christopher MartinFirst light in the mountains
Canon 5DIII + 17-40mm lens at 25mm: 1.3 seconds at f/11 on ISO 50
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2014 © Christopher MartinSunshine into the mist
Canon 5DIII + 17-40mm lens at 17mm: 1/8th of a second at f/16 on ISO 50

 


A calm morning at Elbow Falls

First light above Elbow Falls - 2014 © Christopher Martin

I went up to Elbow Falls last weekend and ice-covered all but a sliver of the river and most of the waterfall too.  With the warm days since then, I wanted to see how this beautiful spot looked now.  Much of the snow and ice has melted, opening the waterway and showing another side of Kananaskis.  Spring may be around the corner.


A little winter in Kananaskis

Overlapping seasons - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Winter is beginning to win the hearts and minds of the mountains in Kananaskis Country.  After the sunrise at Wedge Pond, I hiked around the Upper Kananaskis Lake for a little while.  There are some lovely yellows and golds in the trees reaching up along the lower flanks.  With a few days of cool weather the patches of snow have knitted together and trekked down the slopes to meet, and pass through, the forest.

Autumn at Upper Kananaskis Lake - 2013 © Christopher Martin

 


Autumn glow at Wedge Pond

Morning glow at Wedge Pond - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 17-40mm lens (at 17mm): 13 seconds at f/22 on ISO 400

With most of the aspens having turned gold in the lower reaches of Kananaskis Country around Bragg Creek, I was excited to get up to Wedge Pond to see how the colours were around the water and up towards Mount Kidd.  It was a cloudy morning but for a few minutes at dawn the sun broke through in a couple of places.  A strange, soft purple-pink glow illuminated the whole scene fleetingly.  I doubt I will ever get tired of visiting this place.


Among the clouds at Wedge Pond

Moutn Kidd cloaked - 2013 © Christopher Martin

I was up in Kananaskis a few days ago to explore the recently opened stretch of Highway 40 up to the Highwood Pass.  Leaving home in the dark, I arrived at Wedge Pond just as light was creeping into the eastern edge of the sky.

Peeking at the peaks of Mount Kidd - 2013 © Christopher Martin

We had several days of rain preceding this visit so I was unsure what the weather would be like in the mountains.  The reports called for partly sunny with showers.  From experience, that can mean anything from empty blue skies to heavy, wet gray clouds.  I don’t mind either so I was happy to head up and find out.  That morning the mist was swirling above the pond and rising up to meet the low hanging clouds that were stuffed into the valley.  I trotted down to the water’s edge and moved along keeping an eye on Mount Kidd.  The mountain catches the early pre-dawn Alpen glow and can be spectacular right through sunrise.  The view over Wedge and up to Kidd whispered of something good that might come and I was happy to move around, watching and waiting.

Sunrise at Wedge Pond - 2013 © Christopher Martin

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Dawn along the shore - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Seven minutes later, pink light was hitting a few of the higher clouds.  The lower clouds were breaking up and it seemed like a clear view of the mountain was coming forward.

Dawn sneaks a look down at Wedge Pond - 2013 © Christopher Martin

It didn’t – the clean view was swallowed up by the clouds as the rich colours on Mount Kidd came in.  I didn’t mind at all as a few fleeting openings afforded beautiful views of one or two of the peaks for the next couple of minutes.

Morning in the mountains - 2013 © Christopher Martin

I have not had such a dynamic encounter with the weather up at Wedge Pond and I had a great time.  It was fun to play around with the moodiness under the clouds balanced (and thrown out of balance) with the sunrise opening above.  I’m enjoying the late resurgence of summer we are enjoying but I found myself looking forward to the fall colours that always look so wonderful in this special place.  I will be there and would be very happy if these clouds returned then too.


A return to Elbow Falls

 Elbow Falls Dawn - © Christopher Martin-7467

Since the floods, I have been eager to drive up Highway 66 which runs in and out of the valleys where the Elbow River unwinds out of the mountains.  A few weeks ago, the road reopened and I have been back into this quieter side of Kananaskis Country a couple of times since.  On the first trip I went straight to Elbow Falls to see what remained.  Rumours through June and July ranged from the Elbow Falls being reduced to a set of rapids through to vast swathes of land disappearing, replaced by river rock spread over the lost forest area.  The former is not true – the falls remain, as seen in the image here from that first visit after the floods, and are still beautiful.  The latter is very true in many places – many favourite spots, including the winding river path above the falls, have been drastically reshaped.


A secluded waterfall in Kananaskis

 

A quiet place - 2013 © Christopher Martin-7750

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 17-40mm lens at 17mm: 2 seconds at f/22 on ISO 200

I have spent a fair bit of time hiking and travelling around Kananaskis Country.  That said, I have only seen a small amount of its beautiful landscape.  It is always wonderful to find a new place.  On the weekend, I was revisiting a few favourite spots that I had not been able to see since the flood.  Along the drive between two such spots, up Highway 66, the morning mists and fog were slowly rising up in the warming air in a small meadow I have passed by many times but never explored.  I stopped this time for a few minutes to photograph the light and shadows playing with one another.  There was a roar of water nearby but it was hidden deeper into the forest and I had another spot on my mind so I headed on.

Forest morning - 2013 © Christopher Martin-0428

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 70-200mm lens at 81mm: 1/400th of a second at f/11 on ISO 400

Morning sunlight - 2013 © Christopher Martin-0342

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 70-200mm lens at 135mm: 1/200th of a second at f/11 on ISO 400

On my return past the same place an hour later, I pulled off and set out for a little exploration.  I found a trail that led down from the meadow and into the woods.  Following that for a few minutes, I walked up to the top of this small waterfall.  It was the source of the roaring heard earlier.  The water drops only a few metres but it falls into a narrow bowl of rock which intensifies the sound significantly.

2013 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 17-40mm lens at 17mm: 6 seconds at f/22 on ISO 50

A bit of mountain goating saw me step and then jump down into the bowl.  Water vapour was heavy in the air which played a little havoc with the front of my lens but it was nothing a couple of cloths couldn’t handle over the time I was down there.  I stayed for more than an hour – at one point just sitting down and enjoying this wonderful little place.

Over the rocks and through the forest - 2013 © Christopher Martin-7599

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 17-40mm lens at 23mm: 5 seconds at f/22 on ISO 50

The stream is only a metre wide above and below the falls.  At the base, the pool opens up to a few metres across.  There were some signs of recent high water activity but it seems the flow was not enough to damage the trees and bushes that overhang the channel.

Downstream - © Christopher Martin-7731

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 17-40mm lens at 19mm: 2 seconds at f/16 on ISO 50

I believe this stream falls into the Elbow River but I’m not sure if it, or this waterfall, have their own names.  I have to find out from a few of the locals who know Kananaskis Country in a way I hope to some day far down my path.

River rock abstraction - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 17-40mm lens at 39mm: 5 seconds at f/22 on ISO 200

So, for me at least, this waterfall remains unnamed.  In truth, I like it that way for now.  I really enjoyed that narrow wedge of rock and water below the forest and will be returning there soon.


A grizzly bear grazing and running in Kananaskis

One gorgeous blonde grizzly bear - © Christopher Martin-0061-2

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 500mm lens: 1/2000th of a second at f/4.0 on ISO 1600

Note: For this first image, I removed the wireless transmitter in the bear’s left ear which you will see in the subsequent images.  I don’t normally remove tags and such but this bear was so beautiful I had to share an image where the distracting antenna was erased.

On the weekend I drove along Highway 40 into Kananaskis Country where I had planned to head up to the Highwood Pass to see about the bighorn sheep that herd up there at this time of the year.  That did not happen as #40 is closed past the Peter Lougheed Provincial Park junction due to damage from the flood.  I was turning around at the gate to head down into the provincial park when I noticed a grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) shuffling through the grass just off the road.

Heading downhill - 2013 © Christopher Martin-9975

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 500mm lens: 1/2000th of a second at f/4.0 on ISO 800

This was one of the most beautiful grizzlies that I have ever seen.  A young brown bear that I would guess is three or four years old, with a lovely blonde coat and an energetic bounce in her step.  I believe the bear was a female although I could not confirm gender conclusively.  I was reminded of a pair of blonde cubs I photographed in the fall of 2011 about five miles away from here.  However, I cannot say whether this was one of these two bears as neither were tagged then and I did not find any references online to her tag number.

Bear lick - © Christopher Martin-0082

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 500mm lens: 1/1250th of a second at f/4.0 on ISO 1600

She was busying herself digging up rocks and snacking on what was found underneath.  Amid the tall grass, I did not get a clean look at what she was eating but I assume it was mostly insects.  She appeared to have little interest in the wildflowers surrounding her, as I only saw her stop to lick a few of the blossoms, but I loved having these colours to frame her with!

Run Bear Run - 2013 © Christopher Martin-0115

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 500mm lens: 1/1600th of a second at f/4.0 on ISO 1600

After about 15 minutes watching her from the far side of the road (being able to stay far away but photograph closeup is one of the nice benefits of long lenses), she started moving uphill and I thought she would head off shortly.  As it came to pass, that was hastened along only a few minutes later.  I had been the only person watching the bear at first but within 10 minutes there were a couple of other cars that had stopped too.  I was happy to see everyone stay in their vehicles and give the bear space.  We all watched for a while, then a couple more cars showed up so I pulled away from the gate, crossed the road, drove about 200m past the bear and stopped to have a last look.  Shortly afterwards, a conservation officer pulled up.  I was curious to see how he would approach this situation so I waited for a bit.  He stayed in his truck for a few minutes and then decided that was enough bear watching.  He stepped out with a shotgun in hand and fired a couple of bear banger shells while yelling at the bear to get going.  Startled by the loud noise – it did.

Galloping Grizzly - 2013 © Christopher Martin

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 500mm lens: 1/1600th of a second at f/4.0 on ISO 1600

Banff National Park’s officers handle bears a bit different from what I have seen, and in a manner that I prefer, in that they usually do not interfere with bears unless people are being stupid or the bears show an interest in the people watching.  In my opinion, neither was true at that time.  However, this officer probably knows this bear by sight and he is there almost every day so I have to trust that he made the call as he deemed appropriate.  I would have liked to seen him take a little more time to let the bear continue, and potentially finish, grazing but keeping a bear from becoming habituated to humans is a thin tightrope to walk on.  It is easy for those watching to think they could do better.

A little high stepping - 2013 © Christopher Martin-0127

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 500mm lens: 1/1600th of a second at f/4.0 on ISO 1600

Nonetheless, with the first loud noise, the bear sprinted halfway up the hill before slowing down and glancing back at the officer.

Glancing back - 2013 © Christopher Martin-0133

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 500mm lens: 1/1250th of a second at f/4.0 on ISO 1600

With the second shot, she galloped further up and kept on towards the edge of the forest.  I  thought of the running fox that I photographed last month as I watched the bear run – though spurred on by different antagonists, they both can move very fast.  Seeing how much of the meadow it covered when it was sprinting, I was reminded just how quick, deceptively quick, these massive animals can move.   With the bear moving into the woods, I headed onwards.

Back to the woods - 2013 © Christopher Martin-0138

Canon 5DIII camera with a Canon 500mm lens: 1/1000th of a second at f/4.0 on ISO 1600


Snowstorm through the trees

Snowstorm through the trees - © Christopher Martin-9870

A heavy blizzard blew through southern Alberta on Sunday.  The snow fell throughout the day with the wind keeping pace alongside.  The trees on the edge of Kananaskis Country caught pieces of the storm and twirled the snow around the branches in the evergreens.


Moonlight at Elbow Falls

As the moon waxed towards full this weekend, I spent an evening at Elbow Falls to photograph the landscape at night.  The clear air allowed stars to shine even with a relatively short exposure and small aperture (10 seconds and f/8.0, respectively).  Always a bit lonely sitting out there for a couple of hours but the stars are really good company.

Elbow Falls under moonlight - 2013 © Christopher Martin

The 6400 ISO and the bright moonlight allowed for some of the great details at this magical place in Kananaskis Country to show in the image.  I am impressed with the improvements in the dSLR’s low-light capabilities over the last couple of years.  A couple of years ago I spent another evening up at these falls. At that time I was using a Canon 1D Mark III and when compared with the image above and others where I used a 5D Mark III, the detail, structure of the noise and the color are all vastly improved.  The technology is less and less of an obstacle to realizing the images I want to make.  I like that a lot.


Of Kananaskis and Bragg Creek

There are significant pressures on the forests that extend from Bragg Creek through Kananaskis Country.  Kananaskis has sixty parks within its borders which protect two-thirds of the area.  Kananaskis was set up as a multi-use area which would address the “needs of industry, ranching and tourism are still balanced with the mandate to preserve the animals, plants, and processes that keep the Kananaskis Country ecosystem healthy” (history).  The current plans include a clearcut of roughly 700 hectares west of Bragg Creek around the Moose Mountain area.  I was asked to pull together a gallery of images from West Bragg Creek and Kananaskis that could help show what stands to be lost if plans like this are acted upon.  Click on the image below to link to this gallery if you are interested.

Clear-cutting scares me.  I grew up in the Kootenay Valley in British Columbia’s interior and my father had a logging operation along with several tourism based businesses.  His crew harvested forests by employing selective logging, they didn’t clearcut.  The areas which were clearcut in the valleys there, and here in Alberta, often do not recover well.  The topsoil washes away, new trees planted have challenges taking hold and then there are the animals.  Obviously they can’t stick around once the cover, their homes and their food is lost.  The impact is severe for most species and I hope the efforts made to change the current plans are successful.  The Bragg Creek and Kananaskis Outdoor Recreation group has their finger on the pulse of this issue.  For those who are interested there are things we can do to be heard and help to influence the decision makers.  If you are interested, please visit their website for information on the proposed logging and what is being done.  Sustain Kananaskis is another group that is working very hard to raise awareness and change the current plans.  I do not have any direct connection with Sustain Kananaskis but their website has a lot of information and I agree with everything that I see in their mission statement.


Storm Ridge

A storm threatened to cross over the western ridges in Kananaskis yesterday when I was in the Peter Lougheed Provincial Park.  The ridge above caught my eye and displayed the tension high up on the mountains.


Coyote on the move in Kananaskis

Jeff and I were driving back from the Kananaskis Lakes in the Peter Lougheed Provincial Park when we saw a coyote trotting along the side of the road.  We pulled over, set up some long lenses and watched it approach.  As it drew closer, it neither sped up nor slowed down.  It cast a few glances our way but seemed to have some other place to be.

  The coyote crossed the road a couple of times, usually in advance of car coming.  Only two did while we watched and those drove it off of the pavement but not as far as the woods.

This animal looked to be in good health and did not look to be stressed as it carried on.  We were both very curious where it may have been heading.

After a few minutes, with the tail bobbing up and down with its bouncy stride, the coyote went out of sight as it rounded a corner further up the road.


Kananaskis

(click the image to go to a higher resolution version)

Spent most of the day up in Kananaskis hiking, photographing and looking for wildlife.  Such a beautiful and varied country there.  I get focused in on a particular location or species so that I forget about the whole package sometimes.  Yesterday was one of those great times where I felt like I was enjoying, and appreciating, the whole.  If you have a chance to head up to any of the areas that make up K-Country take it, I hope you like it as much as I do.


Mount Kidd – splashes of colour reflected

 

I am drawn back to Mount Kidd in Kananaskis over and over.  In the morning the eastern light accentuates the crags and patterns in the rocks and dominates the skyline from many viewpoints along Highway 40.  From these reflecting pools a bit further south the mountain doesn’t dominate in the same way but I like the balances that can be found between the peaks and the elements along the shoreline.  Later in the morning, I worked the scene with black and white images in mind but with the first light, I was enjoying the splashes of colour.

 

Green algae under one of the ponds provided a green cast to some of the reflections.  I thought the shapes under the water along with the colour were really interesting.

This pond had a floor of stones which was another detail to play with.

With the pink light receding to warm morning sunlight, I liked how the land still in shadow had a cool tone contrasted with the mountain and its reflection.


Mount Kidd

 

The morning got bright quickly when I was at a set of reflecting ponds just west of Wedge Pond and the Galatea Trailhead in Kananaskis.  I met a fellow Calgarian photographer, Graham McKerrell, along the water’s edge and we watched the most promising cloud slip behind the mountain just a couple of minutes before the sunrise hit the face.  The early light was still beautiful on the rock of Mount Kidd and its reflection.  I really had fun once the morning sun was well established as I switched from hunting warm light to thinking about the sun and shadows for black and white images as seen here.

(please click on the image to link to a larger, higher resolution version)

These ponds are a beautiful location to welcome the morning, I hope to get out there once more this season.

 


Autumn at Wedge Pond

(please click on any image to go to a higher resolution version)

The morning was cold as I walked down to Wedge Pond on Friday.  No frost, but very chilly under the clear skies.  I woke early so I was there before the skies had started to brighten.  The only sounds were the splash of the occasional fish jumping and bull elk bugling challenges nearby in the forest.  It was a special moment to take in.  In the darkness the exposures ranged up to five minutes to show the pre-dawn scene as below.  The slowly lightening sky to the east reflected on the upper flanks of the mountain.

As the sun approached, the birds started chattering and a few other photographers showed up for the alpen glow and then first light on Mount Kidd.  Kananaskis lived up to expectations again.  It was lovely to be on the lake’s shore for the morning with the autumn colours coming in.

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A Cold Dawn at Elbow Falls

Following Saturday’s snow storm, we had a beautiful day today.  Sunrise came along at 6am sharp this morning and I drove up to Elbow Falls early and met the day there.  The snow was still holding onto the trees and rocks so the landscape along the river had a strong winter tone.  I was hoping for the early, pink light to reflect off of the clouds stacked above the mountains into this scene.  That did not happen, some clouds eastwards blocked the sunlight until the sun was well clear of the horizon.  When the sunlight did reach into the valley, it was beautiful.

On the way up to the falls I even had a minute to take a nice photograph of a moose sitting up in her bedded down spot from the quick ending night.  A pretty great morning in my photographic book.


A Quiet Morning at Elbow Falls

I have not been up to Elbow Falls in a couple of months so I went for the sunrise on Sunday. The sky wasn’t too cooperative – the clouds hid behind the K-Country mountains instead of catching the morning light while anchored above them, but there was a skiff of snow from the night before that was a nice element to work in.

With the low water and lack of snow around the waterfall, the rocks took center stage and looked beautiful.

Here the snow can be seen in the branches and dusting the rocks.  I enjoyed the palette of colors and the softening effect, here and there, of the snow in these scenes.

When the sun first cleared the eastern ridges, it was softened by a bit of haze and the veins of the falls seemed to glow under this gentle light.

A short time later it rose above the haze and this was the last image I made with the sunlight still playing really well with this landscape.

It was another good morning at Elbow Falls.  One of many special places in Kananaskis and a favourite place for me to spend time.  I created a small gallery on my website from this morning which includes these images and a few more, check them out if you are interested.


Kananaskis Wildlife: Moose on the edge

After following the deer around for a little while, I walked back to the car and continued driving along the back roads that skirt between West Bragg Creek and Kananaskis.  I went by a thicket beside a pasture thinking I would photograph the horses there for a few minutes.  Instead, I found a moose stripping branches near the road.

She watched me for a minute, then continued moving through the meadow snacking along the way.

She wandered towards the frozen creek and then turned west and leapt over a fence before crossing the road and meandering into the edge of the forest where I lost sight of her.


Kananaskis Wildlife: Hide and Seek with Whitetails

Yesterday, I was hiking in Kananaskis Country, west of Bragg Creek, morning along a trail that winds through the forest.  The trees are often well spaced out and allow a lot of streaming sunlight to reach down.  The highlight of the trek was finding a small herd of White-tailed Deer that were moving slowly towards the hills.

I stepped off the trail and shadowed their progress for a few minutes.  I waited for one deer to step into a shaft of light and then tried to create an interesting image.

There were a couple occasions where everything lined up and I got close to what was in my head.  In these pictures, I like the sense of the forest and the magic of sunlight.

I was enjoying the stroll in the woods when I was alone, save for the birdsong and angry squirrel reports, but crossing paths with these deer made it a very memorable day.


Kananaskis Lakes Winterscapes

The storm blew over in waves as I trekked around the Upper and Lower Kananaskis Lakes in the Peter Lougheed Provincial Park yesterday.  Obscuring the far shoreline first, then moving across the ice and rolling over me.  This cycle repeated at both locations and allowed for some moody landscape photographs.

At the Lower Kananaskis there was a stretch of open water below the control station which manages the flow between the two lakes.  The patterns along the edge of the ice worked nicely with the distant lines in the forests and mountains.

Away from the water’s edge there was a man ice fishing on the lake.  I made this one image of him standing over his fishing hole – the compression of the lens telephoto lens makes him look quite close to the edge but he seemed a safe distance.

Upper Kananaskis Lake is completely frozen over now.  The blizzard was at its height when I was there so I waited between waves where I could see across the lake to the rock island and silhouettes of the peaks looming over the west edge of the lake.


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